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Old 03-02-2011, 11:42 PM   #1
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I am doing a reno on small bathroom and want to put in radiant floor mat, can the vent from my forced air furnace be covered with the mat and tiled over or do I still need a vent in the bathroom?

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Old 03-03-2011, 10:04 AM   #2
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Hi All:

So excited to be on a DIY forum! My question is about Radient Heating on a plywood subfloor, covered w/ wood laminate. I'm planning on DIY'ing my bedrooms, but I want to put in radient flooring. Any suggestions on the best/cheapest? I'd appreciate any input!

jade

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Old 03-03-2011, 06:19 PM   #3
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Radiant Heating mats will not provide enough warmth for the whole room, they are only designed to keep the floor feeling warm. You definitely want to keep that furnace vent open to keep the air temperature consistent with the rest of the house.
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Old 03-04-2011, 12:39 AM   #4
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Mike:

Thanks for your input! My question in response is: So, they do sell radient heat as a primary heating source...what do you think of using that type instead? Do you feel it is a good investment?

jade
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Old 03-04-2011, 08:46 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by jadire View Post
Mike:

Thanks for your input! My question in response is: So, they do sell radient heat as a primary heating source...what do you think of using that type instead? Do you feel it is a good investment?

jade
Yes, BUT...and a big but Your home needs to be designed for it in order for the system to work properly/efficiently. Most Radiant floor systems are specifically designed for the home....trying to retrofit an existing home is probably not going to be a very good/cost effective approach.

Your money would be better suited on:

-Insulation
-Windows
-H.E HVAC system
-H.E Water Heater, or on demand system
-Energy efficient lighting, and appliances

Im sure theres more, but those are the big ones that came to mind.
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Old 03-04-2011, 09:36 AM   #6
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Thanks for that. But I'm not talking about the hydro type of radient heating,....I'm talking about the coil mesh heating...I'm redoing the floors w/ laminate.....and thought I would put that radient down under it.

Your thoughts?

jade

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Originally Posted by NCpaint1 View Post
Yes, BUT...and a big but Your home needs to be designed for it in order for the system to work properly/efficiently. Most Radiant floor systems are specifically designed for the home....trying to retrofit an existing home is probably not going to be a very good/cost effective approach.

Your money would be better suited on:

-Insulation
-Windows
-H.E HVAC system
-H.E Water Heater, or on demand system
-Energy efficient lighting, and appliances

Im sure theres more, but those are the big ones that came to mind.
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Old 03-04-2011, 09:37 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jadire View Post
Thanks for that. But I'm not talking about the hydro type of radient heating,....I'm talking about the coil mesh heating...I'm redoing the floors w/ laminate.....and thought I would put that radient down under it.

Your thoughts?

jade
Like said before, thats just for warming the floor, not the room.
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Old 03-04-2011, 09:43 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by jadire View Post
Thanks for that. But I'm not talking about the hydro type of radient heating,....I'm talking about the coil mesh heating

The only type of radiant heat that is specifically made to heat a house (or room) is the hydro type. All of the coil mesh type I've ever seen is simply for warming the floor.


EDIT: Sorry for duplicating what's above
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Old 03-04-2011, 09:54 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Mikef5000 View Post
The only type of radiant heat that is specifically made to heat a house (or room) is the hydro type. All of the coil mesh type I've ever seen is simply for warming the floor.


EDIT: Sorry for duplicating what's above
Better explanation so its all good
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Old 03-04-2011, 12:45 PM   #10
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UUMMm, not so. You can definitly use a low voltage system in there for primary heat. The issue is that you need to know how much heat the room requires. This is accomplished by completing a heat loss calculation. Once you have that heat loss fihure (in btu's or watts), you can then install a system that well surpasses that number to be primary heat. The only problem I see at this point is the floating laminate floor. You can not use a cable system (low voltage or line voltage) under a floating laminate. The element MUST be in a mortar, thinset, SLC etc.

In lieu of that, you can use a Zmesh low voltage system in the bathroom if it's large enough to take the right layout but you still need the loads to make it work.
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Old 03-04-2011, 12:59 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by warmsmeallup View Post
UUMMm, not so. You can definitly use a low voltage system in there for primary heat. The issue is that you need to know how much heat the room requires. This is accomplished by completing a heat loss calculation. Once you have that heat loss fihure (in btu's or watts), you can then install a system that well surpasses that number to be primary heat. The only problem I see at this point is the floating laminate floor. You can not use a cable system (low voltage or line voltage) under a floating laminate. The element MUST be in a mortar, thinset, SLC etc.

In lieu of that, you can use a Zmesh low voltage system in the bathroom if it's large enough to take the right layout but you still need the loads to make it work.
That sounds great if you dont mind having all the floors in your home tile or concrete.

The heat loss calculation is a great tool, dont get me wrong. The home needs to be built properly for a floor heating system. I have a liquid radiant system in my home ( basement and 3 car garage ) 2800', plus 2800' basement with 10' ceilings. My home is ICF built, with energy efficient trusses, windows, and HVAC system. Combining both is great, I wouldnt solely rely on my floor system alone, it helps for sure. Other than redoing all my floors into a big heat sink, im doubtful that the floor system would work for the entire home, and if it would, I dont think it would be as cost effective.

My house is set for 70F all winter continuously, my most expensive natural gas bill was $160.
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Last edited by NCpaint1; 03-04-2011 at 01:26 PM.
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Old 03-04-2011, 01:27 PM   #12
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Zmesh does not require mortar or thinset, etc. It just staples down to the sub and then the floating (with its foam underlayer) floats on top.
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Old 03-04-2011, 01:30 PM   #13
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Zmesh does not require mortar or thinset, etc. It just staples down to the sub and then the floating (with its foam underlayer) floats on top.
Sounds great I cant wait for my first $900 electric bill
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Old 03-04-2011, 01:34 PM   #14
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Wow, I had no idea. When I was in Korea, we had our floors heated, and they were wonderful....but maybe it was hydro.

I appreciate the input, probably saved me some money.


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Old 03-04-2011, 01:35 PM   #15
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Zmesh does not require mortar or thinset, etc. It just staples down to the sub and then the floating (with its foam underlayer) floats on top.

But can you use it for primary heating in those rooms?

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