Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-23-2011, 09:04 AM   #1
Coatings Nerd
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 364
Share |
Default

Radiant Floor, Flooring Choices


I have a radiant floor system in my basement, what types of flooring are best for this? After doing some research, most seem to recommend anything that doesnt restrict the heat transfer. I dont know exactly what I want, so im totally open to thoughts. Its approx 2700 ft. Im not looking to cheap out by any means. I want something that will look good, be durable, and hold up well.

Im more of a coating specialist, and have thought about doing an acid stain, with a clear gloss finish, or a built up waxed finish. My wife likes wood, but im pretty sure that would be the worst thing to do. Laminate I dont think would be much better, durability and ease of install yes, heat transfer..no. I have considered tile, but only certain areas, 2700ft may be overkill

What about commercial carpet? Or even a commercial vinyl?

What do you all think? Fire away, im open to any ideas

Thanks

__________________
www.northcromwellpaint.com

Benjamin Moore, Sikkens, TWP, PPG, Airless sales and service
NCpaint1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 01:29 PM   #2
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 9,924
Default

Radiant Floor, Flooring Choices


Not wise to heat wax coatings or some vinyl adhesives I wouldn't think.

The best conductor of the heat is going to be a thermal mass such as ceramic tile. Radiant heat will also heat the carpet for the most part or at least it will feel warm as you walk on it.

You also should think about what effect the heat could have on causing adhesives to off-gas and having an odor from it over time.

__________________
PLEASE VOTE
IN THE DIY CHATROOMS
PROJECT OF THE MONTH KONTEST
Bud Cline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 02:43 PM   #3
Coatings Nerd
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 364
Default

Radiant Floor, Flooring Choices


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
Not wise to heat wax coatings or some vinyl adhesives I wouldn't think.

The best conductor of the heat is going to be a thermal mass such as ceramic tile. Radiant heat will also heat the carpet for the most part or at least it will feel warm as you walk on it.

You also should think about what effect the heat could have on causing adhesives to off-gas and having an odor from it over time.
Good point, I didnt think of the heat softening the glue. Although I dont know how hot the floor will get at this point, the radiant system is installed but not hooked up.

Do you think commercial carpet would be any better?
__________________
www.northcromwellpaint.com

Benjamin Moore, Sikkens, TWP, PPG, Airless sales and service
NCpaint1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 05:02 PM   #4
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 9,924
Default

Radiant Floor, Flooring Choices


Quote:
Do you think commercial carpet would be any better?
I don't know that it would be any better than garden variety household carpet as long as it isn't a glue-down-installation version.

Let's see what Rusty Baker has to say about this, he has a few weeks of experience with carpet and flooring in general.
__________________
PLEASE VOTE
IN THE DIY CHATROOMS
PROJECT OF THE MONTH KONTEST
Bud Cline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 05:16 PM   #5
Stuck in the 70's
 
Blondesense's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: south central Missouri
Posts: 2,133
Default

Radiant Floor, Flooring Choices


I would talk to a real carpet/flooring place (not one of the big box stores). I'm not sure of this, but I've heard there is a special pad that is made for carpeting over radiant heat.
Blondesense is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2011, 07:22 AM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1
Default

Radiant Floor, Flooring Choices


I would recommend tiles...it transfers heat well. Check out www.radiantheatingny.com they'll have all the answers for you. they got a whole page on what to use and what's best over radiant heat system
agba8406 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2011, 01:50 PM   #7
Member
 
woodman58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Blackwell, Missouri
Posts: 454
Default

Radiant Floor, Flooring Choices


If you wife wants wood you can do an engineered hardwood. The only restriction is that the heat at the floor can not exceed 70 degrees. At 70 degrees at floor level the room will be more than toasty.
woodman58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2011, 07:21 AM   #8
Coatings Nerd
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 364
Default

Radiant Floor, Flooring Choices


Quote:
Originally Posted by woodman58 View Post
If you wife wants wood you can do an engineered hardwood. The only restriction is that the heat at the floor can not exceed 70 degrees. At 70 degrees at floor level the room will be more than toasty.
The thing that worries me about that is the expansion and contraction. The last thing I want is a huge floor with seams showing because they popped apart.

NCpaint1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
uneven heat: testing ceiling radiant heat /finding cables/fix cables martinradiant Electrical 1 10-03-2010 08:22 PM
Radiant floor heat question. ingeborgdot Remodeling 6 03-23-2010 12:05 PM
Radiant Floor Rebuild kiwegan HVAC 15 02-20-2010 03:07 PM
steam v. hot water, radiant sub-system Lor HVAC 1 06-11-2009 03:58 PM
radiant slab vs. overhead radiant tube holedpiston HVAC 2 05-09-2007 11:59 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.