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-   -   Pulled my carpet in preparation for installation of Pergo and found..... (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/pulled-my-carpet-preparation-installation-pergo-found-9297/)

ClemsonJeeper 06-20-2007 03:09 PM

Pulled my carpet in preparation for installation of Pergo and found.....
 
... a somewhat unlevel floor.

I've been moving a 6' 2x4 around to test levelness and I found one area that seemed to be a "high point". I could get gaps of up to 1/4" by moving the 2x4 around the high point.

And, amusingly enough I just noticed that the area had been spray painted and circled by the construction company. What does this usually indicate? Also, the boards at the "high point" are somewhat different cut then the rest of the floor.

You can see it at:

http://www.hitman.cc/floor2.jpg

What does this usually mean? Since this area is the only non-flat part of the floor, should I attempt to sand it down with a belt sander or something? Or should I pull up the subfloor to see what I'm dealing with? I'm just wondering why the builders spray painted a circle around it. Seems they knew about it and didn't do anything about it - would this be covered under my warranty if so?

thanks...
~rob

KUIPORNG 06-20-2007 03:30 PM

opening up may not be a bad idea, if you want to know the truth, be prepare to buy another OSB board for remplacment and do some circular saw cutting though... Of course... if it is still under new home warantee, the first step should then be bring in the builder before any further action...

laying on unlevel ground is a pain before/during and after ....

ClemsonJeeper 06-20-2007 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G (Post 49831)
opening up may not be a bad idea, if you want to know the truth, be prepare to buy another OSB board for remplacment and do some circular saw cutting though... Of course... if it is still under new home warantee, the first step should then be bring in the builder before any further action...

laying on unlevel ground is a pain before/during and after ....

It isn't under new home warranty unfortunately. Was built in 2001 and I'm the second owner (bough tit 4 years ago).

What could be the cause of this? The floor all around the non-circled area is flat/level as can be. Even if I pull it up, when I put some other OSB in nailed into the exact same location/position, aren't I just going to run into the same issue? :) Is it possible to sand the OSB down if its that big of an area?

KUIPORNG 06-20-2007 03:40 PM

Sand it down is also a pain... I would open up to find out why... may be can be fixed whatever underneath to lower a bit... if not... may be you can replace the osb board with some other board which is thinner but stronger .... well... I hope no one will jump in and talk about code violation.... As we all know OSB is weak anyway... plywood is better than it... but since you use a thinner board... may need to go with better wood board and may add more backing under the joist if it is possible,i.e. no pipes ...etc. underneath...

ClemsonJeeper 06-20-2007 05:07 PM

A buddy and I talked about it for a while and we think its just because one of the joists might be slightly higher than the rest, so the builders cut up the usual sized OSB board at the joints to allow the OSB board to be mounted flush with the joists and not bend.

We think we should be able to correct the problem with strategically placed 30# roofers felt in the low points once I get the pergo installed to that point.

Can anyone think of any downfalls of this approach?

NateHanson 06-20-2007 10:28 PM

With a 1/4" tall high spot in the middle of the floor, I think you'll be disappointed with the results of the laminate floor. I think I'd pull up those pieces of OSB, plane down the surface of the joist a bit, and put a solid piece of osb back on top.

I honestly think it'll take no longer than messing around with a very uneven floor, and you'll definitely get better results.

RippySkippy 06-21-2007 08:29 AM

Do you have access to the floor from the bottom? If you do, what's there? Could you post a picture?

I agree with Nate, building up with tar paper wouldn't be the best. Some how you need to lower that portion. It's really odd that they marked this point, there has to be something going on under the floor for that abrupt elevation change in a room of that size.

You could always try the drum flooring sander, just watch out for nails...it'll destroy the sanding sheet in seconds....DAMHIKT.

ClemsonJeeper 06-21-2007 10:44 AM

Unfortunately no, I don't have access to it from below (unless I pulled the drywall off the ceiling of the guest bedroom underneath).

We had talked about pulling the OSB up and trying to plane down the joists and replacing the OSB. However I talked myself out of it since the one piece of OSB is up under the corner of the entry way wall (if you look at the picture, the one piece with the black roof felt on it). I wasn't sure if it would have been nailed under where I couldn't reach it (under the molding/drywall) and I didn't want to have to take the molding/drywall off to pull up that piece of OSB.

So I was thinking since there is only one spot that seems to be higher up than the rest (along one of the joists), of pulling the nails there, and using a belt sander to sand it down, then reinstalling the nails... Pros/Cons on this?

Thanks for all the great advice BTW!

RippySkippy 06-21-2007 12:10 PM

Could you rip up the OSB where someone else did and deal with the floor joist? I don't think you'd have to rip back to the wall, just the existing cut out. But then again if it's glued it's likely that it would be trashed during removal. Of course if you have 3/4" OSB down, you could always replace it with 5/8 and sand where the repair edges meet up.

As for the nails, if they're set below the surface, you might be better to take a nail set and drive them deeper rather than pull...it's likely you'll damage the OSB if you use a cats paw.

NateHanson 06-21-2007 01:24 PM

If there's a corner of the OSB under the wall, just make a cut right on top of a joist along an area that is flat. Leave the half-sheet of OSB that's against the wall, and just pull up all those little pieces in the middle that are bridging the high joists.

I really think you're just going to blow a lot of time trying to fix this without pulling the OSB. It'll take you 2 hours to pull the OSB, plane down the joist, and put down new OSB. (use new osb so you can have a continuous sheet, instead of the little segments that are down now - it'll be flatter). I think this solution sounds harder than it is, and you'll be happy once you just bite the bullet and do it.

My $0.02

KUIPORNG 06-21-2007 02:57 PM

I have a friend who pull up his carpet then pull out a bunch of OSB boards just for the sake of transporting the drywall down to the basement.... hear that should increase your comfort level of removing the small pieces of OSB boards...

RippySkippy 06-21-2007 10:48 PM

If you choose to pull the OSB, and it's glued with construction adhesive, remember a heat gun is your friend. After the OSB is removed, warm it up and peel it off. Let us know what your going to do and more importantly find!


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