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Firehawk734 11-15-2011 06:14 PM

Porcelain Install Job on Basement Slab, How to make Floor Drain Flush...
 
I am doing my Aunt's basement floor in porcelain tile.

She has a couple of floor drains that I will be tiling around. My question is, how can I raise the drain/drain screen up to the level of the tiles so that it presents a very nice, flush surface, rather than leaving the existing floor drain screen in place which is flush with the basement slab?

I would ideally like to have the tile floor look all nice and flush. I am sure that the drain is that heavy black pipe like used on soil stacks...the house was probably built in the 60s or so. It's definitely not PVC.

I would have to imagine there is some kind of drain with a sleeve that maybe I can glue on or something? Too bad it's not PVC, I'd just prime/glue it at the level...

Any ideas would be very helpful. Hopefully home depot carries something I can go grab.

I would assume leaving the floor drain as is would be 'alright', but there will be a bit of a pronounced 'dropoff' from the tile to the drain.

Bud Cline 11-15-2011 06:19 PM

And you think the wise thing to do is to raise the floor drains to a point that defeats the purpose of why they are the way they are to begin with?

How deep below floor plane are they now?:)

Firehawk734 11-15-2011 08:09 PM

LOL

You know what, you are right. They are slightly below the concrete actually.

I guess I was looking for something that looks a bit better because they will appear more 'recessed'.

If the typical thing is to just leave them as is, then I will just leave them as is, and make the tile look as tight around that drain as I can.


I guess I was thinking more like a drain in a tiled shower area, where the surface is flush but the floor of the shower is slanted toward the drain.

Bud Cline 11-15-2011 08:15 PM

Depending on how deep the drains are, you may have to make some cuts to accommodate the drains with tile.:)

ben's plumbing 11-15-2011 08:21 PM

when we tile around floor drains in basements we have cover extenisons made that bring cover back to finsh floor.... looks nice and easy to walk on with no other issues...Ben

JazMan 11-15-2011 10:41 PM

They make Extend-O-Drain shim kits just for that. It may work for your installation. They come is several diameters. The hardest thing will be removing the old grate. I see the orange place carries the 3 3/8" one. (screw to screw). They come in a few other sizes too.

In the past I have tiled over the floor drain and just cut some slits in the tiles for drainage. Looks best this way.........however......a pain if you have to ever get into it for any reason.

Jaz

Firehawk734 11-16-2011 04:19 PM

Thanks Jaz. The slits in the tile sound good, but I don't know how good that'd look unless 1 tile happens to fall right on top of the hole. It probably wouldn't look too good if you have the hole end up on the edge of a piece...I'd guess.

JazMan 11-16-2011 05:07 PM

It'll look good regardless where they end up. Just be sure to make the slits at least 1/4" wide. It's also important that you have enough thin set under it for support. Also be sure to pour some water down the drain every few years, so the trap is filled with water.

Jaz

Firehawk734 11-17-2011 07:40 PM

Jaz,

What do you use to make the slits? I think I'm gonna do it that way. It will look the best. Also, how would you fill in the grout joint if you have one that runs right across the drain cover?

Or are you saying to thinset the entire drain cover, and then when making slits, make them all the way through?

One other thing, do you remove the existing drain cover? I was over at my aunt's yesterday preparing the floor and it looks like there's no easy way to get those covers off.

I will make sure there is thinset all the way up to the drain cover underneath.

JazMan 11-17-2011 07:58 PM

Firehawk, how about you give a name to call you by?

Quote:

What do you use to make the slits?
It's easiest and you'll get the smoothest cuts with a wet saw.

Quote:

Also, how would you fill in the grout joint if you have one that runs right across the drain cover?
A grout joint can be treated as a slit. But if tile edges happen over the grate it makes it easier. You'll figure it out once you know where the drain lands within the tile.

Quote:

Or are you saying to thinset the entire drain cover
No, you leave the grate and spot several gobs on both surfaces. Trim off the excess after the tile is set.

Jaz

Firehawk734 11-17-2011 08:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 773715)
Firehawk, how about you give a name to call you by?



It's easiest and you'll get the smoothest cuts with a wet saw.



A grout joint can be treated as a slit. But if tile edges happen over the grate it makes it easier. You'll figure it out once you know where the drain lands within the tile.



No, you leave the grate and spot several gobs on both surfaces. Trim off the excess after the tile is set.

Jaz

Hi, call me Dave.

I guess I"m still a bit confused about it. I get the idea but just a little bit unsure of exactly where thinset goes and if a grout joint (I would expect will more than likely cross over the drain) can be a slit. I will be using 1/4" spacers. Cutting the slits with the wet saw will probably not be 1/4" wide, probably narrower. I don't know off hand the thickness of the saw blade on my wet saw. But since you mentioned to just use the wet saw...'duh' went off in my head. Easy enough lol.

But can you please detail for me where the 'gobs' of thinset go? From the surface of the drain cover to the tile will be probably be a good distance right? Maybe 1 inch? The drain cover is currently sitting lower than the concrete slab..then you add in the thinset height and you probably have 3/4" to 1". Are you saying to drop a couple tall gobs around the drain cover, lay the tile with slits installed, and then maybe stick something through the slits to make sure they are clear of thinset so that water can pass?

If a grout joint is over the drain, how would it get grouted? If I use a wider joint than the slits, how would that work?

JazMan 11-17-2011 09:00 PM

Dave,

You make the slits with two cuts about 1/4" or ? apart. Then remove the material and dress the ends. You need 2-3 slits leaving about an inch between them for strength. Prior to cutting the slits you consider and mark in which direction and length etc. Then dry fit and determine where to place the gobs and whether shims are needed to support the tiles so the slits will not break later with traffic. Use a thin tool to remove any excess thin set, later you can cut out any grout to make it look neat.

It's doubtful the space will be an inch but maybe? Shim as necessary. You will also need to consider making some diagonal cuts of the tiles if the slope is to steep. Have you ever seen that? You cut certain tiles corner to corner so the tile will "bend" to fit the curve of the floor near the drain.

Jaz

Firehawk734 11-17-2011 09:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 773768)
Dave,

You make the slits with two cuts about 1/4" or ? apart. Then remove the material and dress the ends. You need 2-3 slits leaving about an inch between them for strength. Prior to cutting the slits you consider and mark in which direction and length etc. Then dry fit and determine where to place the gobs and whether shims are needed to support the tiles so the slits will not break later with traffic. Use a thin tool to remove any excess thin set, later you can cut out any grout to make it look neat.

It's doubtful the space will be an inch but maybe? Shim as necessary. You will also need to consider making some diagonal cuts of the tiles if the slope is to steep. Have you ever seen that? You cut certain tiles corner to corner so the tile will "bend" to fit the curve of the floor near the drain.

Jaz

Jaz,

Yes I think I know what you mean by diagonal cutting around that steep spot. The slope isnt' too steep in the area, it's just that the drain is recessed a bit from the slab...I've never heard of shimming the tile though...When i think of shims i think of wood shims. Is that what you mean? I would not really know how to shim it, unless you are just referring to adding the shims under to make the support nice and tight...in that case I get it.

I would just think to use thinset, thicker in some areas, thinner in others, adjusted with the trowel angle. I'm definitetly going with tht slit idea. I was thinking more like 4 slits but the 2 slits sounds better. After all, the goal is just to make an access for water to get through.

I just want to try to be prepared for whatever I may run into, and not start panicking when I get to that point as my thinset begins to harden while I'm contemplating with my finger up my buttocks ;).

JazMan 11-17-2011 10:30 PM

I don't recommend wood shims at all. I was thinking if the grate is 1/2" or so below the new tiles that you could place a narrow strip of tile to support it over the grate only. Otherwise just thin set will be fine.

Jaz


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