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kirkeric 08-13-2007 01:48 PM

Outdoor Tiling
 
Hello,

Before posting this, I did some research. I understand that for outdoor tiling, that porcelein is probably the best in climates that get below freezing and due to ability to withstand water absorption.

Having said that, are there any pointers on this? I also heard that cutting isn't as easy as tile. I have a water tile cutter that I used on marble no problem as well as pretty heavy outdoor pavers and it worked.

I think I am to use a multi purpose or latex acrylic thinset mortar as well?

Appreciate any info on porcelein vs ceramic, etc.

I am covering an outdoor atrium area of about 150 Sq ft of pretty well all nice square angles.

Eric


JazMan 08-13-2007 08:33 PM

What is the condition of the slab? Does it have expansion joints or control joints in the field? How much slope for water run off? Where is the slab located? Aside from the elements, does it get much sun?

Jaz

kirkeric 08-14-2007 09:01 AM

Jaz,
The slab is one complete piece with no cracks or expansion joints. It is in a breeze way like area that has above cover and open on one end. Basically, it is the area between the garage and the main home with the roof covering the whole structure. Very good shape for a 1958 home.

Only during heavy rains does the outer most edge collect a small pool of water that quickly dissipates and I think i could probably cure that in the process of installation. Clearly though, water is not an issue. It gets the morning sun coming in and that is pretty well gone by around 9-10am.

I inserted a picture. It is a terrible picture but all I could find at work here. You can see the area between the garage and the house, with the ladder right there. That area is the area I intend to tile.

Thanks,
Eric



Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 57566)
What is the condition of the slab? Does it have expansion joints or control joints in the field? How much slope for water run off? Where is the slab located? Aside from the elements, does it get much sun?

Jaz


JazMan 08-14-2007 09:08 PM

Porcelain tile or any frost proof tiles will work outdoors. If it was exposed to the elements, the should be an expansion joints every 8-12 ft., in addition to the normal ungrouted space around the perimeter.

Use a quality modified thinset that is specified to outdoors use if you go directly over the slab. It would be smart to install an isolation membrane such as Ditra by Schluter. The extra $250 or so in materials would give you added confidence that all will hold up as it should.

Looks to me like you're in Maryland? Yes?:yes:

Jaz:yes:

kirkeric 08-15-2007 08:20 AM

Jaz,
The measurement is actually 8 x 21 ft and is one solid slab. If it was supposed to have expansion joint, it doesn't :) Doesn't have one crack either. Now, the "ungrouted space"....glad you pointed this out. The slab does have a slight space between it and the brick walls. Sounds like that was intentional by your comments.

So, when I cover this, are you suggesting that my tiles not meet the walls and leave a similar spacing? I was curious about whether that was there for other reasons such as drainage or expansion.

I guess my license plate revealed my location but yes I am in Maryland.

Eric

Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 57746)
Porcelain tile or any frost proof tiles will work outdoors. If it was exposed to the elements, the should be an expansion joints every 8-12 ft., in addition to the normal ungrouted space around the perimeter.

Use a quality modified thinset that is specified to outdoors use if you go directly over the slab. It would be smart to install an isolation membrane such as Ditra by Schluter. The extra $250 or so in materials would give you added confidence that all will hold up as it should.

Looks to me like you're in Maryland? Yes?:yes:

Jaz:yes:


JazMan 08-15-2007 05:37 PM

I wanted to figure out where you lived to get an idea on the kinds of temps and weather you're exposed to. Oh.....those are Maryland plates?:thumbup:

At 8x21 ft. you would be smart to install an expansion joint near the center the short way, dividing the space in to an 8x10 and 8x11 area. Simply leave out the grout in that one joint and instead caulk with the matching color caulk. Buy it from a tile shop, they'll have the caulk in the right color and in sanded variety to match the texture of your grout.

That black asphalt paper between the concrete an the wall is there just for that reason. Leave a gap roughly the same width as the space and fill with caulk.

Jaz


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