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french_guy 03-23-2013 06:39 PM

Need some advice for laminate
 
3 Attachment(s)
Hello

I'm removing the carpet in our bedroom to put laminate (12 mm with pad)
I have some plywood boards that are not flush together...
What could I do to fix this?
I thought I could at least sand the seams to minimize as much as possible
I would like to keep it simple (don't want to lay down a new layer of plywood !!!)
I will also put an underlayment (Bellawood premium) and it will help as well

Any idea?

Thanks

joecaption 03-23-2013 06:50 PM

Far better idea to lay at least an underlamnet of 3/8 underlaymant rated plywood first. Making sure the seams do not line up with the seams below and do not nail into the joist.
The floor will be stronger, less chance for squecks, no chance of air coming in from below.
You wasting your time trying to sand what's there now.

french_guy 03-23-2013 06:56 PM

The problem is that I've already done 1 room (office) on the 2nd floor, so any additional layer in other rooms will be an issue.......Unless I accept to have a transition with 2 different heights
The transition itself is not an issue because all the rooms lead on the hallway. Layout in every rooms will be perpendicular to the layout in the hallway. So I will need transition bars between each room and the hallway
But having difference in height (3/8) is another story !!!

If I were to sand the seams, should I use #36 or #50?

french_guy 03-24-2013 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1144110)
Far better idea to lay at least an underlamnet of 3/8 underlaymant rated plywood first. Making sure the seams do not line up with the seams below and do not nail into the joist.
The floor will be stronger, less chance for squecks, no chance of air coming in from below.
You wasting your time trying to sand what's there now.

If I decide to lay down a layer of plywood:
Why I should not nail into the joists? And by the way, nails or screws?
If I use nails, which type should I use (gauge and diameter?) If I go that way, I will have to buy a nail gun: which type should I get?
Do I need to leave expansion gap between each board? if yes, how much?
I've read somewhere that the new boards should be parallel to the current one....is that correct?

Thanks

joecaption 03-24-2013 08:26 AM

No gaps needed.
The whole idea is to form a gap free layer over the OSB so it makes full contact.
There's always tiny low areas between the floor joist, if you nailed the underlayment to the joist there would still be a gap between the joist.
I use a narrow crown pnematic staple gun with 1-1/4 staples set in touch and go.
I can nail a whole sheet in about 1 min.
It needs to be fastened every 4" on the edges and 6 to 8" in the field.

If you do not want to buy a new tool it can be done by hand with underlayment nails. It will say that right on the box.

french_guy 03-24-2013 09:30 AM

I have a brad nailer, will have to check if it does crown staples
But is seems to be a lot of staples per sheet..., so if I do that, I don't want to do manually !!!
What do you think is best:
*) put a plywood underlayment and lay down the laminate
or
*) fix the current OSB flooring (sanding?) and use the Bellawood premium underlayment (3 mm thick, from lumber liquidator - $72 for 100 sq ft roll)?

Probably bets option is to do both, but budget becomes an issue.....
So what would you recommend?

joecaption 03-24-2013 09:54 AM

That brad nailers a toy not going to work for this.
I have two guns a ridgid and a Porta Cable.
Both look like this.
http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/R150FSA-...r/EN/index.htm

How would I do it or what can you get by with?
If I was doing it I would install at least 1/4" underlayment rated plywood.
But you can get by with just the padding.
A better grade of flooring will have the padding built into the flooring so it's faster to install and less expencive in the long run because there's no padding to buy.

french_guy 03-24-2013 10:32 AM

At least the plywood underlayment will help to fix the issue with the baseboard being too high....There is a gap between the bottom of the baseboard and the floor, and the 12 mm thick laminate is not enough in some spots to cover it. A 3/4 quarter round will cover it, but not too much surface of that quarter round will apply on the baseboard. So raising the whole floor by at least 1/4" will help
Is this an appropriate underlayment:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/1-4-in-x-...m#.UU8NpxzU-CU

joecaption 03-24-2013 10:51 AM

Should work, just do not use louon.

french_guy 03-24-2013 10:56 AM

what is louon? A brand?

joecaption 03-24-2013 11:04 AM

http://www.menards.com/main/building.../p-1480812.htm

If you google it you'll find it spelled at least three differant ways.

french_guy 03-24-2013 12:24 PM

And this is not good?

Fix'n it 03-24-2013 12:54 PM

joe. how is 1/4" going to be stable on a subfloor that is not "flat " ? seems to me that would just create an open pocket that would cause problems.

french dude. did you try finding out why those boards are not setting flat/even ?

french_guy 03-24-2013 12:57 PM

No, I don't know why...But it is only 2 boards, the rest is OK
So you think 1/4" won't be good enough? What is minimum you would recommend?
I do not want to remove the boards to find out though.......

Fix'n it 03-24-2013 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by french_guy (Post 1144652)
No, I don't know why...But it is only 2 boards, the rest is OK.


So you think 1/4" won't be good enough? What is minimum you would recommend?


I do not want to remove the boards to find out though.......


i think you need to find out.

idk, seems to me it would be a problem. i would recommend 0" but a few .001's would probably be ok.

i think you do need to remove those boards.


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