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Old 09-08-2013, 09:51 PM   #1
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moisture barrier


I'm putting a hard wood floor in a 120 sq ft addition. The addition is a poured cement floor. I planned on fastening a 3/4" ply sub floor to the concrete. My question is about a moisture barrier. Is there some kind of moisture barrier paint that goes in a basement that would work, or do need to put a sheet of plastic or something? Does there need to be an expansion gap around the sub floor, or just the finished floor? I live in Iowa, so there's plenty of cold dry winters, and hot humid summers. I'm sure there are many options. Thanks in advance for the input

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Old 09-08-2013, 10:01 PM   #2
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moisture barrier


May not be your best plan.
Consider using engineered flooring installed as a floating floor instead with a vapor barrier under it.
You end up with the same look but it's far more stable then solid wood.
It's comes prefinished so there's no smell or dust.

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Old 09-08-2013, 10:27 PM   #3
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moisture barrier


Well that sounds like a good idea. One problem. When I poured the cement I, I poured it 1 1/2" lower than the floor in the adjacent room. I did this to compensate for the sub floor and finished floor to make them even when finished.
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Old 09-09-2013, 12:48 PM   #4
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moisture barrier


Did you put a vapor barrier down before you poured the slab? If you did that then long term moisture should not be a problem. Short term moisture (moisture being released from the slab while it cures) can be solved with a high moisture adhesive. Read the fine print. High moisture adhesive is only good until the slab cures.
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Old 09-09-2013, 09:47 PM   #5
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There was some plastic that was put down in that area a while back. The previous owners just had it under some gravel that was there. I would feel more comfortable having a barrier besides that one, not knowing what kind of condition it's in. With the short term as you called it, that slab has been curing for a little more than 3 months in drought to severe drought conditions here in Iowa. I am correct in assuming that is enough time for curing? It's about 5" to 6" in spots. thanks
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Old 09-10-2013, 12:14 PM   #6
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moisture barrier


i am in the same boat as you- held the slab down 1-1/2" as well!
I thought about the poly under the plywood also- I think the fasteners thru the plywood and poly into the slab will negate any effect it would have had so I am now looking for some sort of paint or troweled material for the barrier...... haven't figured it out yet though......
how were you attaching your plywood to the slab? tongue and groove or spacing the plywood?
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Old 09-10-2013, 02:17 PM   #7
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There are moisture mitigation systems used in commercial facilities, but I am not aware of them being used in residential homes. Check with a local specialty floorcovering supply house. I doubt a big box would have it. Also you can get calcium chloride test kits online that you can use to test for moisture in the slab. Check with flooring manufacturers as to exactly what the moisture limitations are on the product. It will say something like >5 x 1000 sqft or >85% RH (relative humidity) etc.
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Old 09-10-2013, 02:25 PM   #8
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Sorry not sure how to edit post but I intended to say ">5 lbs per 1000 sqft" Here is a link to the test type I talking about: http://www.amazon.com/Moisture-Test-.../dp/B006MO36AY

Here is a moisture mitigation system for installation before the hardwood goes down hardwood floors:http://www.blakestevens.com/subFloor...Mitigation.asp
I think you can get that in about any brand, but that one is a good brand, I don't know about the retailer though. No endorsement, lol. Moisture mitigation system don't totally stop moisture but they slow it down to a tolerable level.
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Old 09-13-2013, 07:01 AM   #9
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t-g plywood or square edge for underlayment?

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