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-   -   Metal Door Frames/Door Casing (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/metal-door-frames-door-casing-157962/)

tadio 09-25-2012 02:19 PM

Metal Door Frames/Door Casing
 
Hello all,


For quite some time anytime I've had any issues, my Google searches would send me here for the most part, and in most cases the posts on here solved any issues I may have had.

Now I have one (I lie, two actually) problem that I have been researching but have yet to obtain an accurate understanding for the resolution.

I have been asked to install laminate floors in a medical building. That's fine, I've installed laminate (as well as hardwood) too many times to count. However, while taking my measurements and viewing the space, I noticed the door frames and casings are metal. First time encountering this. It's always been either wood or MDF. Not this time.

Now, from what I have read, there are two options, cut them to slide the floor under, which is what I'd prefer as it looks a lot more professional and is the way I believe it should be done, or cut the laminate to place around the door frame and casing as opposed to underneath, and then silicone the gap. This sounds like crap, and I can only imagine how ugly it will look.

So, I want to cut the metal door frame/casings. Everyone seems to be suggesting using a multimaster tool, or grinder. I don't like using grinders and I don't own a multimaster tool. My question is, can I not use my reciprocating saw with a steel blade? In fact, I was thinking of purchasing these tonight http://www.homedepot.ca/product/6-pc...etal-c/964235#

I've read many individuals bringing up the possibility of sparks flying or even the risk of causing a fire, all things I'd like to avoid.


My second question/issue are the sinks that seem to be in each room. Should I run the floor up to them, leaving the 1/4" gap that I will then fill in, or should I remove the base, trim them to the necessary new height with a table saw, and then run the floors underneath and place it on top? Giving the professional flush look?

Please advise, I start tomorrow.


Thanks in advance!

Awoodfloorguy 09-25-2012 06:52 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I would suggest not cutting the door jambs. Instead just cut the flooring as closely as possible around the jamb and door stop and then caulk. The last time I did this I found a caulk that matched perfectly. I asked the same question on here or contractor talk right before my last job involving these and I recall someone mentioning that these are not supposed to be cut. I was worried about it until I got to the first one and realized I was able to cut the flooring really close to them. I purposely made a joint at each door jamb and the back layed the flooring on those rows. It makes it a lot easier to 2 piece these.

Here is a picture of one of the rooms we did on this job that had about 10-15 offices off of the center room. The total job had probably 30 doorways like this..

joecaption 09-25-2012 07:20 PM

Plus a multi tool will not cut steel like that.

tadio 09-25-2012 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Awoodfloorguy (Post 1017310)
I would suggest not cutting the door jambs. Instead just cut the flooring as closely as possible around the jamb and door stop and then caulk. The last time I did this I found a caulk that matched perfectly. I asked the same question on here or contractor talk right before my last job involving these and I recall someone mentioning that these are not supposed to be cut. I was worried about it until I got to the first one and realized I was able to cut the flooring really close to them. I purposely made a joint at each door jamb and the back layed the flooring on those rows. It makes it a lot easier to 2 piece these.

Here is a picture of one of the rooms we did on this job that had about 10-15 offices off of the center room. The total job had probably 30 doorways like this..

Thank you so much for your reply, it has assisted greatly. What about the expansion gap? Disregard it in this case and place it as tight as I can as you suggested? Will most likely do so.

The picture provided great assistance as well.

I have not yet seen what finish the owner has chosen for the laminate, but am sure I will be able to find similar matching caulking.

I will do the same for the sinks.

Thank you so much once again!

Awoodfloorguy 09-25-2012 08:56 PM

No problem. Glad to help. I would not worry about the expansion gap in the doorways or near the sinks. Just cut as closely as possible, and then caulk. I am assuming you are talking about pedestal sinks?

tadio 09-25-2012 09:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Awoodfloorguy (Post 1017405)
No problem. Glad to help. I would not worry about the expansion gap in the doorways or near the sinks. Just cut as closely as possible, and then caulk. I am assuming you are talking about pedestal sinks?

It's a rectangular vanity. Similar to this below, although from what I recall, the base meets flush, as opposed to in the picture where the front sticks in half an inch.

Yeah will do the same with these.

Thanks again, this has taken a load off my back. Only thing I'm worried about, rookie mistake, forgot to notice whether the doors will need to be trimmed, which would stink considering they're all 36" wide, 3 hinge, steel doors and there's about twelve (12) of them. Did not plan on that, very time consuming. Pray to God that when I get in tomorrow to begin, I realize they are high enough that they can remain the same height.

Awoodfloorguy 09-25-2012 09:11 PM

I highly doubt the doors will need to be trimmed. In my experience with jobs like this they are usually up pretty high. Although, that would be horrible if you had to. Those types of doors probably weigh a ton.

tadio 09-27-2012 08:50 PM

Update
 
Okay, today was day two.

Yesterday I was able to prepare and finish three (3) rooms, approximately 300 square feet total.

Today I did the same for another three (3) rooms, also approximately 300 square feet total.

However, once I got to the edge, I left them to come back to, and complete them all in the same day.

I have one room left, approximately 150 square feet, which I prepared today to complete tomorrow.

As for the doors, not only do they definitely require trimming as they do not go over the current floor given the new height, but as it was stated above (awoodfloorguy) yeah, they weigh a freakin' ton. I remove two (2) today, and was barely able to move them over to lean on a wall.

I have about seven (7) of these doors to trim, and somehow I closed one while installing the floors (in a room with two doors) and now it won't open, and the hinges are strange, double-ended I guess you would described them as? I couldn't seem to get them off at first try, will see if I can figure something out tomorrow, wish I had left that door open.

Tomorrow I plan on marking, removing, trimming and rehanging all doors required, then complete the last remaining room, then lay the 250 linear feet of baseboard on top of cardboard on the ground to paint and later install, go back to all the rooms and finish the end strips, trying to neatly install them around the metal door jambs, and then install the transitions, and finally install the baseboard.

Will probably have to return one more day for a bit to tie up loose ends, touch-ups, caulking, etc.

One new issue I came across that I had never encountered before either:

In two (2) of the seven (7) rooms, the current floor consisted of a thin industrial carpet (the other five (5) rooms were had vinyl tiles). I realized this carpet was glued to the sub-floor, which happened to be concrete, not plywood as I had hoped and always dealt with for the most part.

How am I going to install the transitions (in this case reducers) in these two (2) rooms? I can't use my fancy finish nailer as it's concrete, and won't go through. I can't use PL to glue it onto the carpet, it won't stick (I don't think). I guess my only option is to rip out a strip of the carpet, scrape the glue off the concrete, and then use PL on the reducer and directly onto the concrete? Will this work/last?

Something I realized, (there's carpet in the hallway leading to all these rooms) whomever installed the carpet in the hallway, whenever, ran it up to random places. Some end at the door stop, some before, some after.


And just for the hell of it, I wasn't expecting to have to trim the doors, especially ones of this nature (I should have first originally noticed if they'd need to be trimmed when I arrived to see the site and take measurements, my fault) would I be in the right to charge him extra for this work? I'm not going to, but I'm wondering if this is a freebie for him or something that is usually included in the price.

Anyway, enjoy my life story. Thanks for reading!

tadio 09-27-2012 08:52 PM

OH and as for those vanities, the first one was no problem. The second, was way off. The side was on such a weird angle, so it took me two tries to figure out a cut to make the perfect fit, it was a bit off, and then I accidentally moved the base of the vanity with the floor plank and realized it wasn't even secure in the first place, it was loose, and I could have just straightened it out and run a full piece all the way across, which I ended up doing afterall.

tadio 09-27-2012 08:56 PM

Oh yeah and in those two carpeted rooms I left the carpet as I figured it would just act as its own underlay.

Awoodfloorguy 09-27-2012 09:20 PM

For the transitions; did they come with the tracks? If so you can pre drill some holes in the concrete and screw them to the concrete. If they didn't you can either pl a strip of thin wood to the concrete and then nail the transition to the stripped or pl it to the strip. Just put something heavy on it. Maybe one of those doors. Just kidding. Just use a couple boxes of the flooring.

We usually don't include trimming doors, but will if people need us to. I would charge for it. But it is kind of late if you didn't previously mention this.

tadio 09-28-2012 09:42 AM

http://www.doric.com.au/images/sized...h2-280x375.jpg

These are the hinges on these doors, for the one I left closed and floor up to and now won't open, how do I remove these hinges? I thought they would come out by hammering a pin through it but these are different from the ordinary ones I've dealt with.

Awoodfloorguy 09-28-2012 11:04 AM

Sorry man. I am not too familiar with these. I guess the worst case is; you could remove the screws from the hinges if you have access to them with the door closed.


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