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Old 03-11-2009, 05:52 AM   #16
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Laying dura ceramic tiles on concrete


We run a retail store and do the installation. Duraceramic is an okay product. Not great, just okay. Dollar for dollar it's a waste of money. All you are paying for is the warranty. I can sell you a hundred different Solid Vinyl Tiles with a commercial rating that will far outperform Duraceramic at about half the price.

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Old 04-27-2009, 04:21 PM   #17
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Laying dura ceramic tiles on concrete


I have both installed and sold DuraCeramic both as a manufactures rep and a retailer. Installation issues with this product are largely due to installer error. This is a very simple product to install if you follow the instructions, or attend a Congoleum installation training. I would use the product in my house in a heartbeat. This product IS thermo-reflective, meaning that it will reflect the ambient temperature of the air back into the room rather than absorbing and dispursing it. Thus, it will stay warmer than a stone or clay based tile. It IS made from crushed limestone, but it it also is made largely from resin, it's what holds the limestone together. If it were me, I would always grout it if you wanted it too look like real ceramic tile. However, this is an alternative to stone or clay textiles. In many instances it is not an option to install ceramic tile in a kitchen as once you install a backer board or Ditra, your appliances will no longer fit in their origional locations under the cabinets, so clearance becomes an issue. As for chipping and edge delamination, I have not experienced this and I have installed and sold a lot of this stuff. The origional product called DuraStone is not near the product DuraCeramic is, and there may be some people that get these products confused for one another. Nation wide, the claims ratio for this product is very low. This product IS NOT bulletproof as some retailers try to sell you on. It has it's limitations, as does any product. It is not great in areas with excessive moisture or extreme temperatures. But, it is a great alternative to ceramic tile rather than using vinyl or laminate. Plus, the installations options you get with DuraCeramic plus allows you to get some neat looks, like a pinwheel pattern for example. I disagree that it is a waste of money. I have specific cases where appraisers have valued a home higher because they thought the floor was real porcelain tile. The only people who knew any different were the home owners.

Last edited by BrentCos; 04-27-2009 at 04:23 PM.
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Old 04-27-2009, 11:16 PM   #18
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Laying dura ceramic tiles on concrete


BrentCos - You're kidding! Right?

"Looks like the real thing"
"Appliances don't fit using real ceramic"
"Appraisors mistake it for the real thing"
"Installer error"

You make me laugh. I love it. How long have you been doing standup comedy?
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Old 04-28-2009, 11:38 AM   #19
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Laying dura ceramic tiles on concrete


Bud Cline:

You may shoot off the hip with your comments, and are somewhat opinionated...............I must tell you that I value your advice very much, even though you yelled at me once...............
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Old 04-28-2009, 11:57 AM   #20
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Laying dura ceramic tiles on concrete


YummyMummy;

What's your problem? this morning, you hit me with your condescending attitude and now you're going after Bud Cline too?

Look, neither of us need life coaching lessons from you, so try some other schmucks on some other board.
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Old 04-28-2009, 01:18 PM   #21
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Quote:
BrentCos - You're kidding! Right?

"Looks like the real thing"
"Appliances don't fit using real ceramic"
"Appraisors mistake it for the real thing"
"Installer error"

You make me laugh. I love it. How long have you been doing standup comedy
?

No, I'm not kidding.
I have litterally had people say "oh, I like this ceramic tile."
Had an older home that had a vinyl floor and the appliances only had 1/4" of clearance before hitting the the countertops. I have seen this several times.
Yup, installer error. But I'm sure you don't make mistakes It is obvious that you know it all. Could you please hold a training class to teach all of the rest of us?
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Old 04-28-2009, 01:55 PM   #22
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Laying dura ceramic tiles on concrete


Quote:
Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
YummyMummy;

What's your problem? this morning, you hit me with your condescending attitude and now you're going after Bud Cline too?

Look, neither of us need life coaching lessons from you, so try some other schmucks on some other board.
Don't get your panties in a knot......

If you look at your reply to Trevina, now who is condescending? Which is why I told you to play nice.

As for going after Bud Cline: Me and Bud go way back even before you existed on this site, so take a chill pill, and relax........

Bud knows I love him.
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Old 04-28-2009, 10:30 PM   #23
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Laying dura ceramic tiles on concrete


Here's the problem when it comes to totally independent flooring installers vs: flooring retailers.

The bottom line is the success of any flooring installation attaches itself firmly to the shoulders of the installer. When retailers hire hourly installers it is their (retailers) responsibility to see that a job is done correctly and is successful. When they (retailers) subcontract an installation to an independent installer it is that installer that carries 100% of the resposibility.

Most all retailers think independent installers are over-paid and don't really like to use them. Retailers like to skim the cream for themselves.

When a retailer meets an independent installer on a website-forum the truth usually comes out about how the retailer operates.

Retailers like to create fires so they can extinguish them themselves. The truth is there is MORE PROFIT in DuraCeramic on the retail side then there is in real ceramic so retailers naturally like to SELL DuraCeramic over real ceramic. It just makes good sense from a profit standpoint.

Problem is...many untruths and phony stories are told so-as to make the sale. Kinda like a used car salesmen.

After installing ceramic tile for more than three decades I can honestly tell everyone that never once (NEVER ONCE) have I done an installation that wouldn't allow appliances to fit into their cubby holes. This is a situation that is simply too easy to avoid. It is avoided by taking the floor covering "back" to the original subfloor. It-is-just-that-simple.

Retailers unfortunately like to tell a customer that it is OK to heap floorcovering on top of floorcovering as years go by. If they were to be honest about the situation they would tell you they fear the loss of a sale due to additional preparation costs that customers never want to hear about. The name of the game is to "CLOSE THE SALE" while the customer is ripe-for-plucking and before they leave their store and have an opportunity to shop around and run into an honest professional. Hence, statements such as: "Looks like the real thing", "Appliances don't fit using real ceramic", "it was only driven on Sundays by a little old lady going to church".

Quote:
But I'm sure you don't make mistakes.
The truth is...I don't make many mistakes these days. When I started this back in 1976 I made my share of mistakes but unlike a lot of retailers I learned from my mistakes and am now at the top of my game. A retailer such as yourself would do well to have someone like me on his payroll. I could teach you a thing or two I'm sure.

Quote:
It is obvious that you know it all.
Actually I don't "know it all" but I do have a grasp on a whole lot of information about my trade, certainly more than MOST retailers can attest to.

Quote:
Could you please hold a training class to teach all of the rest of us?
As a matter of fact I do hold seminars and teach a little fundamental tile and stone installation. I would be happy to come to your place of business and conduct a class for a fee. Contact me anytime for my Rate and Fee Schedule. We could do a ONE DAY "skim the basics", we could do a THREE DAY "basic theory and practices", or we could do a FIVE DAY (all of the above) plus "hands-on". YOU of course supply everything - no real knowledge is expected from you.
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Old 04-29-2009, 08:11 AM   #24
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Laying dura ceramic tiles on concrete


.......and this is why I love you Bud Cline.........
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Old 04-29-2009, 06:53 PM   #25
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Laying dura ceramic tiles on concrete


I was looking for a new kitchen/laundry floor about a year ago. I was interested in ceramic tile. Went to a reputable dealer and asked about ceramic/porcelain. He advised me of the "DuraCeramic" product and how easy it was to install and what great wear and durability it had.

I took that info and did some searching on Google. That's where I found this forum. After reading this forum and others for about 4 -5 hours, I found sufficient info for me to make a decision. I decided to go with real tile - I used 13" porcelain tile.

I am not sorry one bit that I did not opt for the DuraCeramic. I have no idea how good or bad that product may be, but I did do some research to educate myself for my project.

I am strictly a DIY, no links to any flooring company etc. but I strongly suggest that anyone considering any kind of flooring should get on the internet, do some searching, participate in a forum or two and educate yourself. Ask questions, get some references and testimonials - get enough information to make your decision.

Last edited by orange; 04-29-2009 at 06:55 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 03-11-2013, 09:31 PM   #26
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Laying dura ceramic tiles on concrete


Our house is about 23 years old and was built on a slab. The flooring that was in the house when we brought it several years ago is vynal press-and-stick tiles, which was laid on top of vynal sheet flooring. The press-and-stick tiles have shifted over time, and are now popping up.

I have spent more than a week looking at various tiling options and speaking with several dealers and several installers. Each one I speak with has a different flooring favorite, and a different dealer the installer recommends.

We would like a durable floor, that is quiet and easy on the feet and legs... not cold and hard, not cheap looking, but not high end material either.

One of our installers has recommended using the Duro Ceramic product. I have looked at several styles and had chosen one to go with, but wanted to speak with one more installer that was recommended to us by a family friend.

When I spoke with him today, he recommended against using this product stating that it does not hold up well, if it gets wet it warps, and we should look at usiing ceramic tiles. He didn't even recommend using porcelin, as another installer did.

We are very much at our wits ends, and are all floored out!

Please share with me any suggestions or comments on using either material. We are also leaning toward having the floors pulled up and taking it down to the subfloor.

Thanks!

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