DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Flooring (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/)
-   -   laminate install (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/laminate-install-2471/)

diyjoe 05-10-2006 10:43 AM

laminate install
 
I am installing some Quality Craft laminate flooring in my second floor 3 bedrooms and hallway in an old brick home (approx. 500sgft. total). The laminate is 8.3mm x 4.33inches wide x random length beveled edge planks. I have installed other laminate before (in downstairs sunroom), have had no problems with it and have been pleased with the product. The rest of my 1st floor is hardwood , that I recently refinished and it is already scratched and marred from dog and kids.
I was attracted to this product because all of the seams will be on a beveled edge of individual planks and it looks very realistic.
I am installing over an old wood plank sub floor (pine), 3 inch wide, that is level.and fairly tight. I can feel some very slight deflection when walking on parts of it, but no creaking except in hallway. I know I have a few high spots to sand but I donít see any major issues except in the hallway where I have a low spot. I am planning on repairing/replacing some boards here and I may use some self leveling cement compound.
I have also purchased some quietwalk underlayment. In addition, the store where I purchased the laminate gave me some .075 inch thick polyethylene padding.
I have read a lot of the posts in this forum and I have a list of questions.
1. I would like to run all of the planks in the same direction. In my case, I think the most important consideration would be to lay the planks perpendicular to the direction of the sub floor planking regardless of room width. This will mean that the laminate in the hallway will run in short lengths across the hallway. Does this sound right?
2. Based on what I have read in other posts so far, I am planning on putting thresholds in
all the doorways. I may try to skip the threshold for one of the hallway / bedroom doorways for the smallest bedroom at the end of the hallway. Would this be a mistake?
3. Based on my description of conditions, is there any advantage to using both the polyethylene padding and the quiet walk, or would that be too much cushion? If I were to use both, in what configuration?
4. Has anyone had any experience with Quality Craft laminate? It is made in China. It appears to be very similar to the pergo and kronotex narrow width laminates Iíve seen at Lowes. Iím a little concerned with how many seams I will have and whether I should consider gluing even though it is a glueless product. Any advice/comments on installing these narrow width planks would be appreciated.
I know this is a lot for one posting, but I thought I would get it all out at once. Thanks in advance for your comments and advice.

Floorwizard 05-10-2006 07:24 PM

1) no need to worry about floor joist direction with that kind of material.
so do what you feel.

2) it may be a mistake, it may not. it depends. let's put it this way....transitions are cheap help. best results come from transitions in doorways.

3) Do not use both pads. too much cushion......

4) Never heard of the stuff, but if it's the same quality as lowe's it is entry level lam. use furniture protectors, and buy the correct cleaning supplies for lam floor.

diyjoe 05-13-2006 07:45 AM

laminate install
 
Florcraft, thanks for your reply.
I wanted to clarify. You said that all of the Lowes have entry level lam, although I've also read that you like some of the Pergo products. The local Lowe's carries these Pergo and Armstrong products:
PERGO SIGNATURE
CASUAL LIVING
AMERICAN COTTAGE

Armstrong(Kronotex)
SwiftLock Premium Laminate

My real question is in regards to opinions on these narrow width products. There seems to be more and more of that product - at least around here in PA. It creates a lot of seams.
Do you think gluing might be a good idea or to much overkill?

Also, I wanted to clarify the direction of the boards. The hardwood on my first floor is layed perpindicular to the wood plank subfloor. I read somewhere that is the way to do it. I also read that you should lay the lam flowing with the longest wall direction. I am trying to decide what is the most important consideration.

Floorwizard 05-13-2006 12:45 PM

I like the higher end products

Pergo-select
Wilsonart - estate plus

the thinner boards are more realistic in my opinion.
If the manufacturer suggest dry fit or glue choice, I would always choose to glue it. Although some manufacturers are dry fit only.

which way to run the boards?
it's a choice, not a demand. they are suggesting with the long wall, but it's not a rule.

both ways are fine.

diyjoe 05-16-2006 10:23 AM

laminate install
 
1 Attachment(s)
Thanks again Florcraft.
The manufacturer says I can glue if I desire. Said any laminate glue will be OK. Now I am wondering whether this is too much overkill and I am eliminating the ease of removal aspect.

Have read a lot of posts about direction and I would like to see if anyone else out there might have an opinion on this so I am attaching my crudely drawn floor plan . I am planning on installing in the 3 bedrooms and the hallway.
Thanks again

thopfinger 05-17-2006 02:37 PM

Florecraft, can you suggest how to replace a glued plank?
 
Hi Florecraft, I live in Anchorage, too. I have a glued Pergo floor. I have one damaged plank and a replacement that matches up. How do I remove the damaged plank and replace it? Is this a job for a pro?
Thanks for your help!

Tony

Floorwizard 05-17-2006 03:57 PM

Left to right looks good to me.

Quote:

Said any laminate glue will be OK
I guess they don't have warranties then.
Any other manufacturer will not say that.

Quote:

How do I remove the damaged plank and replace it? Is this a job for a pro?
Of all the jobs that pro's should do, this is one of them.

thopfinger 05-17-2006 09:13 PM

How much does it cost?
 
Thanks Florcraft. How much does such a repair cost in Anchorage?

diyjoe 05-20-2006 07:47 AM

laminate install
 
Thanks for your responses Florcraft.
Actually the laminate does have a 25 year warranty, but that only covers wear, fade and stain. This warranty is similar to others I have seen, including Pergo. I have been looking at the Wilsonart products lately and I can see why you like them so much. They do look to be the superior products and they seem to be the most innovative company. I am certainly going to consider them for a future kitchen project.
However, I already purchased this Quality Craft laminate for the second floor. I think I got a good price and I "think" it is of good quality. Does the type/brand of glue really matter that much considering that the cores of most laminates are the same HDF material? I have also read a post where someone glued the butt ends only. Maybe this is the way to go?
In heeding your advice about transitions in each doorway, I have been looking at T moldings. I am planning on using my own base moldings finished to match the color of the floor. Is their such a thing as a unfinished wood T molding that I could finish myself and do all T moldings have to be used with the U track? All of the T moldings I've seen are prefinished and none exactly match the color of the floor.
Clarifying, when you said install laminate left to right from my drawing, did you mean perpindicular to the existing plank subfloor which is illustrated on my drawing?
I am doing other work in the bedrooms (walls) and am planning on starting the floor install in 2-3 weeks, so I still have some time.
Thanks again and if any other installers want to weigh in on this thread please do so.

Floorwizard 05-20-2006 02:15 PM

Quote:

Does the type/brand of glue really matter that much considering that the cores of most laminates are the same HDF material?
Probably doesn't matter much, but I am a pro, and I use specific products on specific materials.
If you use another glue, you are taking a risk. Maybe not a big one, but still.....

Quote:

I have also read a post where someone glued the butt ends only.
Wierd.

Quote:

Is their such a thing as a unfinished wood T molding that I could finish myself
you bet! Find you wood transitions, and stain to match.

Quote:

Clarifying, when you said install laminate left to right from my drawing, did you mean perpindicular to the existing plank subfloor which is illustrated on my drawing?
yes. Although I made that decision by look, not because of the existing plank direction. Just to clarify.

redline 05-20-2006 02:35 PM

Helped a friend install some flooring. Instead of placing one piece in and then 'tapping' it to the adjacent piece (butt joints) we locked all the butt joints together of that row first and then tilted the entire length and locked it to the previous row. The floor length was over 20 feet long so we had three people when we tilted in the entire length. Seems to work better this way because you will not have to 'tap' each piece together. The first few rows tend to move if you use the tap method. Make sure that the butt joints are flush before you tilt in the row.

Floorwizard 05-20-2006 08:52 PM

That works est with a higher quality floor.
The cheaper stuff usually has less quality milling, so it can make a long row tough to snap in at the same time.

worth a try tho I guess.

diyjoe 06-05-2006 07:51 AM

laminate install - glueing
 
Finished repairing walls and painting the first bedrrom and getting ready to lay the flooring. Was hoping to get more help/advice on glueing. Have not made up my mind yet. If I were to glue is it necessary to clamp the flooring as some instructions I've read specify? Also, I am thinking of glueing just the hallway planks as this area will have some short pieces running across the hallway and is an area that will have the most traffic. Good/bad idea? I am planning on transitions from the hallway to all the bedrooms, however I've not been able to find any unfinished wood T moldings as yet. Any advice on where to find them and can they be installed without the use of a U track?

Floorwizard 06-05-2006 11:52 PM

Transitions can be glued to the substrate. As long as they are not glued to the lam flooring.

I would glue a lam if the manufacturer has the option. It's cheap insurance IMO.

saltwater 11-21-2007 12:24 PM

I plan to buy Lowes Pergo Signature American Cottage Glueless flooring. Has anyone used this flooring?

Thanks
Sharon


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:15 PM.