Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-21-2012, 06:51 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 10
Rewards Points: 10
Default

laminate or hardwood in basement


I'm looking for a little guidance on choosing hardwood or laminate for my basement. It's dry and I haven't had any moisture. I also want to use the thickest option possible to bring flooring even or close to even with carpet. Lastly a step by step on installation would be much appreciated. It's obvious i'm not handy but would like to try it. Thanks!

dfarago is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2012, 07:01 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 27,495
Rewards Points: 4,106
Default

laminate or hardwood in basement


Neither, use engineered hardwood.
Laminite to me looks like plastic.
Hardwood can not be nailed down or glued down to concrete floor.

Engineered hard wood is real wood attached to plywood. It's far more stable. can be bought up to 3/4" thick, can be refinished, has a super tough finish on it. It can be installed as a floating floor so there's no need to attach it directly to the concrete.
Your still going to need an underlayment. Cork works best.

joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to joecaption For This Useful Post:
dfarago (02-22-2012), Edgar214 (02-21-2012)
Old 02-22-2012, 04:59 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

laminate or hardwood in basement


While I agree that an engineered hardwood would be the way to go should hardwood be selected as the material to go down in the basement, there are still a lot of laminates that have improved aesthetically over the years; many offer a very authentic, non-plastic appearance. That being said, although it was mentioned that moisture has not been an issue in your basement, should it ever be, many laminates have been constructed with moisture resistant technologies, e.g., Armstrong laminates offer the HydroCore, Shaw offers OptiCore, and Mannington uses a combination of aluminum-oxide and Teflon to ward off wear, tear, and water damage. All that said, there are a wide range of options whether you go with engineered hardwood or laminate, but definitely keep laminate on your radar unless you find an engineered hardwood that you can't live without; we've worked with many clients who, after years of having it down, are still thrilled with the laminates that have been put into their basements.

I hope this helps!
aaron_david is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2012, 07:23 PM   #4
Member
 
JetSwet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lagrangeville NY
Posts: 963
Rewards Points: 502
Default

laminate or hardwood in basement


You can get 10mm or 12mm laminate the higher mm grade the less plastic/ cheap it will look the tougher and thicker it will look as well.

Sent from my iPhone 4 ios5
JetSwet is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Laminate floor in basement questions ryoung25 Flooring 8 09-15-2010 11:33 PM
Laminate in a basement danidisney Flooring 2 07-12-2008 08:26 PM
Laminate in Basement Question atilla137 Flooring 16 11-10-2007 08:44 PM
Laminate in Basement over Hydronic Radiant Heat art2670 Flooring 3 10-12-2007 11:17 PM
Flooring hardwood v engineered or laminate skits Flooring 1 07-12-2006 10:03 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.