DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Flooring (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/)
-   -   Laminate floor damage - repairable? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/laminate-floor-damage-repairable-173631/)

mgp roofing 03-05-2013 03:55 AM

Laminate floor damage - repairable?
 
3 Attachment(s)
Our local kendo club dojo floor has about half a dozen patches where up and down (1-1.5mm) movement occurs between the planks, last week I noticed that in a couple of places the edges are starting to splinter.
Its a floating floor, I have no idea what brand, but its a thin oak veneer over what looks like MDF. Concrete subfloor, installed approx. 2008. Building was previously a motor home manufacturer's factory.
I have attached 2 pics of the worst areas. In the last pic, the damaged areas pictured are in the middle foreground in the vicinity of the various items of kendo equipment on the floor.
Would pushing glue into the joints with a syringe provide a lasting fix? I am aware that people put tape over areas like this, but that soon peels up and becomes a nuisance itself.

oh'mike 03-05-2013 07:36 AM

Sadly--that floor is worn out----it was not tough enough for it's use---

That being said----Sure----glue it---use CA glue----it will petrify the loose fibers and hold it together--the continued flexing will eventually end the life of the floor--but this will buy you some time----

Use a thin,watery CA glue so it can soak in----Super Glue is a CA glue----A friend uses a lot of it and gets good prices and quality from a seller on E-Bay---

mgp roofing 03-07-2013 04:34 AM

That was what I suspected. I actually use CA glue to repair cracks etc when doing my wood turning, but hadn't thought of it for this application--it has the advantage of being fast drying---could walk in, do the repair, and by the time I have my kit on, the repaired area is ready to use.
To repair cracks in turned items, I just drip it on the crack, rub in a pinch of fine sawdust and leave for a few seconds to set---the same method would likely work here--Use fine sandpaper to smooth the area if needed.
The hardest part will be telling them the floor is on its last legs---replacement with a more suitable product will be big $$---I don't know if there are any floating floor products that are up to the job---most dojo floors are solid wood either glued directly to the concrete (hard on the body) or constructed like a gymnasium floor with some sort of shock absorbing material under the supporting joists--where would I buy such a system--the timber supports and flooring is readily available in the local area.

oh'mike 03-07-2013 07:55 AM

Today is a day I wish one of the hardwood guys would look in---

I suggest you start a thread on tough floors----good luck----

Canarywood1 03-07-2013 12:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mgp roofing (Post 1131539)
That was what I suspected. I actually use CA glue to repair cracks etc when doing my wood turning, but hadn't thought of it for this application--it has the advantage of being fast drying---could walk in, do the repair, and by the time I have my kit on, the repaired area is ready to use.
To repair cracks in turned items, I just drip it on the crack, rub in a pinch of fine sawdust and leave for a few seconds to set---the same method would likely work here--Use fine sandpaper to smooth the area if needed.
The hardest part will be telling them the floor is on its last legs---replacement with a more suitable product will be big $$---I don't know if there are any floating floor products that are up to the job---most dojo floors are solid wood either glued directly to the concrete (hard on the body) or constructed like a gymnasium floor with some sort of shock absorbing material under the supporting joists--where would I buy such a system--the timber supports and flooring is readily available in the local area.


This may interest you.

There are many types of subflooring for a gymnasium, but they all have the same concept in mind -- to help reduce the impact on your lower back, ankles and knees. One of the most common types of subflooring systems used today for gymnasiums incorporates round rubber pads under a plywood subfloor. The pads are small rubber discs filled with air, set about 12 inches (30.5 centimeters) apart from each other over the entire area of the floor. Think of a fancy athletic shoe that uses air-cushioned soles, and you have the right idea. This padding gives the court the spring necessary to combat fatigue and injury.

mgp roofing 03-11-2013 05:31 AM

I tried the CA glue trick on 3 of the problem areas tonight--a spot where the MDF had split allowing a corner to lift, a split in the oak veneer, and one of the loose joins--seemed to work, I'll check it again once its been subjected to a few hours of keiko-- if successful, we'll do further repairs in an effort to extend the life of the floor, as most of the area is still in sound condition.

Could dips/hollows in the subfloor be contributing to the problems?

oh'mike 03-11-2013 05:56 AM

Sure, voids allow the floor to flex---and that is what is causing the seams to fatigue---


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:18 AM.