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-   -   Laminate on concrete (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/laminate-concrete-193551/)

c47205 01-08-2014 08:53 AM

Laminate on concrete
 
I'm lookin to put some laminate flooring on the concrete floor of my basement. I was advised by the carpet layer who is doing the carpeting down there to put vapor barrier under the laminate. My question is does this laminate need glued to the concrete or can it float. I will be using 6 mil plastic as barrier. This is a 100 sq foot area and the basement is dry.

Trucon01 01-08-2014 09:24 AM

I was thinking of doing the same thing, but was advised not to. The basement is dry now, but who knows what can happen. Have you looked at the vinyl plank flooring, which has a similar look?

joecaption 01-08-2014 09:35 AM

Both can have issues.
Some laminates will fail after a single water event.
One leaking pipe, high humidity, wax ring leaking, washing machine over flows and there trash.
There's about 1000 post on this and just about any DIY site talking about installing over a slab and finding mold growing under it.
If your going to do it I'd suggest using a product like Dri-Core under it as a subfloor.
Laminate can not be attached to the floor in anyway! It's never glued down.
If you did all the seams would open up from trying to expand and contract.

KinNorth 01-21-2014 09:54 PM

Check out the January 2014 postings on the Allure flooring thread. Their provide criteria. After reading that, if doing it again, I would lay down and tape the poly moisture barrier whether or not my basement was bone dry - just to "future proof" it. I'm very happy with the allure.

Gary in WA 01-22-2014 06:15 PM

If in a cold climate or near a daylight basement wall, the springtime moisture could condense on the backside of laminate flooring to mold; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...bef2a9fb9809f2

http://www.epa.gov/athens/learn2mode...enrys_map.html

http://nsidc.org/fgdc/maps/gtmap_can_us_browse.html

That is where XPS and plywood will out-perform the Dricore product; it also insulates and stops room condensation.

Gary

rusty baker 01-22-2014 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KinNorth (Post 1294883)
Check out the January 2014 postings on the Allure flooring thread. Their provide criteria. After reading that, if doing it again, I would lay down and tape the poly moisture barrier whether or not my basement was bone dry - just to "future proof" it. I'm very happy with the allure.

To be fully prepared, read all the threads about the failure of Allure, too.

KinNorth 02-22-2014 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gary in WA (Post 1295201)
If in a cold climate or near a daylight basement wall, the springtime moisture could condense on the backside of laminate flooring to mold; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...bef2a9fb9809f2

http://www.epa.gov/athens/learn2mode...enrys_map.html

http://nsidc.org/fgdc/maps/gtmap_can_us_browse.html

That is where XPS and plywood will out-perform the Dricore product; it also insulates and stops room condensation.

Gary

The thing is, wouldn't mould form on the underside of any vapour barrier laying on top of the concrete (if the moisture can't evaporate and escape into the room)?

The Drycore only provides about 1" of foam insulation would that be enough?

Wouldn't a concrete sealant, or a coat of varnish or something seal out all moisture?

joecaption 02-22-2014 08:18 PM

Floors can not be water proofed from the topside.

rusty baker 02-22-2014 09:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1311189)
Floors can not be water proofed from the topside.

Absolutely right.


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