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Old 02-29-2012, 12:08 PM   #1
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Kitchen floor questions


I'm getting ready to replace my kitchen floor. The existing floor is laminate wood placed over ugly 12"x12" adhesive tiles (with foam underlayment in between). Found some damaged floor pieces and can't find anyone who carries a match for both color and the shape of the tongue and groove, so that (as well as the fact it's kinda ugly) led me to decide to replace the whole floor. Also subfloor is wood, not a slab.

I'm looking at going with a floating laminate again because this room has a medium amount of traffic (4 kids, but no dogs) and of course it will get wet from water spills from time to time. Another unfortunate reason is cost as I'm on a limited budget.

Do most laminates hold up to possible dents from chairs and tables? The current laminate didn't show any dents or marks from the chairs, table, and fridge.

Should I consider engineered? It tends to be more expensive, but is it worth it?

And last, I read comments on here about Lumber Liquidators products and it seemed mostly negative. Anyone have good luck with them? Or should I not even consider going there?

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Old 02-29-2012, 12:13 PM   #2
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One other question...when people submit photos to Lumber Liquidator's website showing the end results of using their products, are they required to use blurry, grainy cameras?? I swear all their customers are the same people who used their cameras to capture evidence of Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster.

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Old 02-29-2012, 12:26 PM   #3
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Most laminte flooring would not be a great choise in a kitchen or bathroom.
Water will cause it to swell and delaminate.
Engineered wood should be fine and it will look like real wood because it is, holds up great and would not look like a plactic floor like laminet.
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Old 02-29-2012, 01:22 PM   #4
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Laminates are at best an up-grade from vinyl floor tiles, nothing more. They are designed to be inexpensive and easier to install them some other floors. Laminate can look nice, but do not add value to a home, (in you really cared).

The main thing I don't like about them is their appearance and the hollow sound they make when walking on them. Other than that they are fine. As with anything else they are not created equally. Many people love them, many have had nothing but problems.

Hardwood isn't the greatest choice for kitchens either. (4 kids, scuffing and spills) But if you resign yourself to refinishing every now and then it's a much better choice.

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Old 02-29-2012, 01:25 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
Most laminte flooring would not be a great choise in a kitchen or bathroom.
Water will cause it to swell and delaminate.
Engineered wood should be fine and it will look like real wood because it is, holds up great and would not look like a plactic floor like laminet.
I've read the newer laminates are better at water resistance. Any experience with those?

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Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
Laminates are at best an up-grade from vinyl floor tiles, nothing more. They are designed to be inexpensive and easier to install them some other floors. Laminate can look nice, but do not add value to a home, (in you really cared).

The main thing I don't like about them is their appearance and the hollow sound they make when walking on them. Other than that they are fine. As with anything else they are not created equally. Many people love them, many have had nothing but problems.

Hardwood isn't the greatest choice for kitchens either. (4 kids, scuffing and spills) But if you resign yourself to refinishing every now and then it's a much better choice.

Jaz
I did notice the hollow sound of the existing laminate flooring. Sounds like walking on sheets of plastic. How do you feel about engineered wood?
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Old 02-29-2012, 01:34 PM   #6
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Quote:
I did notice the hollow sound of the existing laminate flooring. Sounds like walking on sheets of plastic. How do you feel about engineered wood?
Engineered is much better, it's real. But it's gonna cost more and you indicated the budget. (Do you know of anyone with no budget?).

Wood does not like moisture. High moisture and water spills will cause problems. You mentioned 4 kids, how's that gonna work?

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Old 02-29-2012, 01:35 PM   #7
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This really depends on quality. installed correctly can look very nice, the higher mm rating the better the turn out overall. There isn't any reason not to I stall In kitchen. If you want lam because of affordability then there is your answer.
I say step it up to a higher mm rating 10 or 12mm
You won't feel that it's fake the seams won't chip on you.

Last edited by JetSwet; 02-29-2012 at 02:05 PM.
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Old 02-29-2012, 02:42 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
Engineered is much better, it's real. But it's gonna cost more and you indicated the budget. (Do you know of anyone with no budget?).

Wood does not like moisture. High moisture and water spills will cause problems. You mentioned 4 kids, how's that gonna work?

Jaz
I do know a few people with plenty o' budget...and I am definitely NOT one of them!

As for the kids, they're not abusive so much as messy. Spills, drops, etc. But I will say the oldest ones are at the age where they can start learning how to fix things they have broken.

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This really depends on quality. installed correctly can look very nice, the higher mm rating the better the turn out overall. There isn't any reason not to I stall In kitchen. If you want lam because of affordability then there is your answer.
I say step it up to a higher mm rating 10 or 12mm
You won't feel that it's fake the seams won't chip on you.
The 8 mm. laminate that was already in the kitchen has survived at least 3 years of spills and drops, as well as moving in new appliances across the floor and sitting at the table without any warping, scratching or dents. So I must admit I've been impressed with the laminate's performance so far in the kitchen. If the thicker laminate doesn't sound as "hollow" that would be perfect.
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Old 02-29-2012, 03:04 PM   #9
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You should double plus the life if you step up to 12mm.
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Old 02-29-2012, 07:38 PM   #10
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I'm sure a 12mm is likely to be a better overall quality than a 9mm, but not necessarily just because of that. The thickness of the laminate "unit" has little or nothing to do with how it's gonna wear. The wear layer is on the surface and is paper thin in both cases. It's not that simple.

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Old 02-29-2012, 08:23 PM   #11
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http://12mmlaminateflooring.net/the-...ates-flooring/
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Old 03-03-2012, 05:11 PM   #12
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Okay, I removed the old laminate flooring and underneath I found ugly adhesive tiles. But those tiles were attached to OSB board which was laid over top the original linoleum floor. Should I remove the layer of OSB? That would explain why when I installed the dishwasher it barely fit - I had to lower it as low as it could go to get it to fit under the counter.
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Old 03-03-2012, 05:45 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spaceman spif
Okay, I removed the old laminate flooring and underneath I found ugly adhesive tiles. But those tiles were attached to OSB board which was laid over top the original linoleum floor. Should I remove the layer of OSB? That would explain why when I installed the dishwasher it barely fit - I had to lower it as low as it could go to get it to fit under the counter.
Well if you start removing layers you wont probably stop removing layers.
R you positive that it's osb not luon?
Upload a pic of the wood.
How high is the kitchen floor now from the let's say sister rooms?
Maybe if it's so high up we can get the floor to the same hight as rest of the house?

Did you end up going with the 12mm? Lam?
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Old 03-03-2012, 05:54 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by JetSwet View Post
Well if you start removing layers you wont probably stop removing layers.
R you positive that it's osb not luon?
Upload a pic of the wood.
How high is the kitchen floor now from the let's say sister rooms?
Maybe if it's so high up we can get the floor to the same hight as rest of the house?

Did you end up going with the 12mm? Lam?
It's definitely a 1/4" sheet of osb. It was set on top of the original linoleum floor, then 12"x12" adhesive tiles were placed on that. Apparently the next owner placed 8 mm laminate on top of that, which I'm replacing with better 12mm laminate.

This room butts up against the living room which has ugly berber carpeting covering original oak flooring, which I will refinish later on. If I put in the 12 mm laminate without removing the osb, it will be at least 3/8" higher than the oak flooring.
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Old 03-03-2012, 05:58 PM   #15
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Okay, just had a chance to lay out a piece of the new floor, and if I don't remove the OSB, the finished floor will be 3/4" higher than the adjacent floor!

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