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Old 08-28-2011, 07:09 PM   #1
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Insulayment question


Dear experts,

I am installing hardwood floor. My sub-floor is plywood. I purchased "insulayment" to go under the hardwood floor. My question is simple: should/can I staple the underlayment to the plywood? Or I must glue it? I wood prefer to avoid it: it seems that the underlayment under the hardwood that will be nailed to the plywood will have no way to go anyway. Still, I would like to ask you what is the right thing to do.

Thanks,
Dmitriy

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Old 08-28-2011, 08:26 PM   #2
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Insulayment question


MP Global Products | Insulayment Underlayment
Follow the manufacture directions .

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Old 08-28-2011, 08:46 PM   #3
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Insulayment question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Floor Doc View Post
MP Global Products | Insulayment Underlayment
Follow the manufacture directions .
Thank you for your answer. I have read the directions. But on the picture there I can see that the underlayment is glued to the plywood, and then the hardwood floor is glued to the underlayment. But I am going to nail the hardwood floor, so I don't understand why one would need to glue the underlayment. Also, the instruction doesn't state that it is the only way, or what glue should be used.
Thanks,
Dmitriy
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Old 08-28-2011, 08:54 PM   #4
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Insulayment question


If you are nailing you don't need to glue it . I would use a foil tape for the seems though . duct tape is ok , but not as good as foil .
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Old 08-28-2011, 09:55 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Floor Doc View Post
If you are nailing you don't need to glue it . I would use a foil tape for the seems though . duct tape is ok , but not as good as foil .
May I ask what the tape is for?
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Old 08-28-2011, 11:04 PM   #6
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Insulayment question


MVE Moisture Vapor Emissions , and to hold the seams together .
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Old 08-29-2011, 07:25 AM   #7
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Insulayment question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Floor Doc View Post
MVE Moisture Vapor Emissions , and to hold the seams together .
Does it matter what side of the underlayment goes to the top, and what side goes to the bottom?
And if one decides to use glue, what glue should it be?
Thanks.
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Old 08-29-2011, 07:47 AM   #8
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Insulayment question


Logo facing up .
This is a good pad for a floating floor . For a nail down i would use either a 15lb felt [tar paper]. or Aqua bar B .
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Old 08-29-2011, 09:34 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Floor Doc View Post
Logo facing up .
This is a good pad for a floating floor . For a nail down i would use either a 15lb felt [tar paper]. or Aqua bar B .
Hmm, I don't see any logo...
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Old 08-29-2011, 10:04 AM   #10
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Insulayment question


Is this what you have ?
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Insulayment question-noname.jpg  
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Old 08-29-2011, 11:00 AM   #11
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Insulayment question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Floor Doc View Post
Is this what you have ?
No, I don't have anything blue. It looks like on the picture here:
http://www.quietwalk.com/insulayment/index.html
on both sides. Just one side is little bit smoother.
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Old 08-29-2011, 11:33 AM   #12
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Insulayment question


One side should be smoother then the other . put the smooth side up .
What are you actually nailing to the floor 3/4" ?
you still need to get the floor flat , and take rh , temp, and mc readings .
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Old 08-29-2011, 11:52 AM   #13
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Insulayment question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Floor Doc View Post
One side should be smoother then the other . put the smooth side up .
What are you actually nailing to the floor 3/4" ?
you still need to get the floor flat , and take rh , temp, and mc readings .
Yes, 3/4". I don't understand what it means to take rh , temp, and mc reading?
Is it important to have the smooth side up? Sorry for the silly question, but the people in Lamber Liquidators where I bought the product told me it didn't matter, so I already cut it in wrong way
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Old 08-29-2011, 12:58 PM   #14
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Insulayment question


Why am i not surprised at the info you got at LL.
The smooth side is the barrier .
MC = moisture content
RH = Relative Humidity
Temp = temperature of the house .
They all have to jive for the wood to be acclimated . for 2 1/4" wide the wood has to be within 4% MC of the substrate . 3" and wider 2% at a certain temp and RH .
Time has nothing to do with acclimation . If the house is not acclimated the wood can set there for a year and still not be acclimated .
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Old 08-31-2011, 08:39 AM   #15
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Insulayment question


One more question: I read in another thread of the forum that insulayment may be a bad idea in general for a nailed hardwood floor, because nails would not hold well having that soft stuff between plywood and the floor. Do you have any information if this is true? Because if it is so, I would not use it at all, though I have already spent $100 on it.
Thanks.

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