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Old 11-04-2010, 10:14 AM   #1
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installing solid wood


When installing solid wood flooring, does it matter if you go parallel or perpendicular with the floor joist

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Old 11-04-2010, 11:44 AM   #2
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Best to go perpendicular if possible. With a stiff joist system and a thick subfloor, it won't matter.

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Old 11-04-2010, 11:49 AM   #3
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Best to go perpendicular if possible. With a stiff joist system and a thick subfloor, it won't matter.
I read about the subject very thoroughly and found that ^^^ is dead on.
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Old 11-04-2010, 12:20 PM   #4
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Best to go perpendicular if possible. With a stiff joist system and a thick subfloor, it won't matter.
3/4 inch sub flooring with floor joist 16 inch on center manufactured by truss joist
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Old 11-04-2010, 12:21 PM   #5
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Hey Hpswv,
I am Gregg from The Home Depot in Chicago. With the proper underlayment the direction of the flooring won’t make a difference in the quality of the install. Usually the flooring direction is determined by the shape of the room and where the main natural light source is. You want the flooring to go in the same direction of the light coming in from a window or patio door. I hope this helps. What kind of flooring did you get?-Gregg
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Old 11-04-2010, 12:26 PM   #6
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Bruce Hardwood with the lifetime finish guarantee Butterscotch, Do you reccommend 15# roofing or resin for underlayment.
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Old 11-04-2010, 02:44 PM   #7
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Hey, Very nice choice! How will you be installing it? If you are just gluing the tongue and grove parts together than just use a red rosin paper or the light foam underlayment that is often used for laminate. The Underlayment is meant for floating floors and its purpose is to help prevent noise caused by little imperfections in the wood. Let me know if you have more questions. Thanks. -Gregg

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Old 11-04-2010, 04:48 PM   #8
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I am going to be nailing it down,
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Old 11-04-2010, 08:25 PM   #9
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Bruce Hardwood with the lifetime finish guarantee Butterscotch, Do you reccommend 15# roofing or resin for underlayment.
Roofing felt over areas that are more likely exposed to moisture, like over garages, and crawl spaces, and red rosin paper used in rooms with no moisture. You could of course just choose to use the better product (Roofing felt) like I do regardless of the conditions.
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Old 11-05-2010, 06:54 AM   #10
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Roofing felt over areas that are more likely exposed to moisture, like over garages, and crawl spaces, and red rosin paper used in rooms with no moisture. You could of course just choose to use the better product (Roofing felt) like I do regardless of the conditions.
Thank you I will just go with the roofing felt
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Old 11-05-2010, 06:58 AM   #11
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Installing hardwood floors by traditional nailing methods has changed considerably over the years with theOld hardwood floor cut nails advent of pneumatic fasteners. Now the choices have included stapling. We're often asked which one is better. It sure beats that poor fellow in the
black and white photo that used to handle the whole project by hand! Yikes! My hat is off to the guys that did this kind of work. Today the consensus points towards staples but some professionals go the other direction; more below.
Proper Subfloor Is A Must!

Insuring you have a suitable subfloor is the most important ingredient for any successful installation when laying solid 3/4" hardwoods. Failure to heed this vital prerequisite will lead to spongy, creaking, and popping sounds. Nails or staples need a proper bite, otherwise they will loosen over time.
Types Of Suitable Subfloors

• 3/4" CDX grade plywood
• 3/4" (23/32") OSB PS2 rated underlayment
• Minimum 5/8" CDX grade plywood
• Advantech
• Existing solid wood flooring
• Screeds
• Tongue and groove wood sub flooring

Try to search more

I have 3/4 tongue and groove, so I should be ok.
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Old 11-05-2010, 11:50 PM   #12
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is 3/4" popular in other parts of the country? around here the past few homes i've worked in are all 1-1/8th TG plywood for the subfloor. i'm surprised it's not used more since it's literally a couple dollars apart from 3/4

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