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-   -   Installing plywood underlayment (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/installing-plywood-underlayment-95494/)

benr 02-14-2011 05:16 PM

Installing plywood underlayment
 
I am going to install 3/8 good one side plywood on top of my 5/8 plywood subfloor. I will be installing engineered bamboo for a finish.

Anyone have a good step by step guide for doing this, any tips?

Here is what I am planning, correct me if I am wrong.

Install the sheets perpendicular to the joists, making sure not to have a joint where the subfloor joint is.

Lay the sheet 1/4 inch from the wall for expansion. Space the sheets themselves 1/4 apart as well???

Glue the sheets down with PL400, screw around the perimeter with 1" zinc (yellow) deck screws (of should I use coated)? Nail the field with 1 1/4" ring shank coil nails.

Any advice is very much appreciated. There is so much conflicting info out there. Some say DO NOT screw all the way to joists and some say DO hit joists where possible.

Thanks,

Ben

acglobal 02-14-2011 10:19 PM

you have hit everything on the head correctly. As far as nailing/screwing into the joists, I'll let one of the tech. guys answer. Personally I dont screw plywood underlayment through sheathing into joists unless 1) there are squeaks or 2) I am installing tile.

JazMan 02-15-2011 01:08 PM

Hi Ben,

A tile installation requires the most critically stiffest subfloor/underlayment system. I don't see why we should lower the standards for other types of flooring.

Re-fasten the sub to the joists. Fasten the underlayment to the subfloor only using 1 1/4" flooring screws. In this case shorter screws will be OK since the sub is only 5/8".

Ply always goes across the joists regardless on the installation. Offset by at least 20-22" if possible. The accepted gap between sheets is 1/8". 1/4" at the perimeter and solid objects.

NO GLUE. Unless it's a thin wood glue and you can spread it 100% to laminate the two.

Quote:

There is so much conflicting info out there. Some say DO NOT screw all the way to joists and some say DO hit joists where possible.
If you use the right screws you will not hit the joists when installing the underlayment.

Jaz

PS.
Quote:

Personally I dont screw plywood underlayment through sheathing into joists unless 1) there are squeaks or 2) I am installing tile.
Sorry, this is wrong.

Gary in WA 02-15-2011 04:47 PM

Yep; http://www.apa-europe.org/Languages/.../PDF/R340G.pdf

Gary

benr 02-17-2011 02:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 591595)
Hi Ben,

A tile installation requires the most critically stiffest subfloor/underlayment system. I don't see why we should lower the standards for other types of flooring.

Re-fasten the sub to the joists. Fasten the underlayment to the subfloor only using 1 1/4" flooring screws. In this case shorter screws will be OK since the sub is only 5/8".

Ply always goes across the joists regardless on the installation. Offset by at least 20-22" if possible. The accepted gap between sheets is 1/8". 1/4" at the perimeter and solid objects.

NO GLUE. Unless it's a thin wood glue and you can spread it 100% to laminate the two.



If you use the right screws you will not hit the joists when installing the underlayment.

Jaz

PS.

Sorry, this is wrong.


Thanks for the advise. Why No glue?, will it make the surface uneven if not spead properley?

JazMan 02-17-2011 02:37 PM

Quote:

Why No glue?, will it make the surface uneven if not spead properley?
Absolutely, go to the head of the class. Most people would use a thick construction glue from a tube. These beads create slight hills there fore creating tiny valleys, therefore voids. Some people can't get it in their heads that it is not good to glue underlayment. The subfloor YES, cuz you're gluing to the joists, big difference.

Jaz

kirm 05-01-2013 01:12 PM

I'm doing this exact thing
 
I just joined to give a big thanks to the Jazman. I've been researching this for weeks and have run into his posts a few times. They're always right on the money.

Thanks Jaz, you've been a huge help to me in my home projects.

sam floor 05-01-2013 04:26 PM

And don't use drywall screws. Use galvanized screws or deck screws.

JazMan 05-01-2013 10:15 PM

Kirm,

You said;
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kirm
I just joined to give a big thanks to the Jazman.

Very nice of you to stop and say that, but stick around. :thumbsup:

Jaz

Evenfurther 05-02-2013 10:29 AM

Check out these GRK R4 screws. I use these GRK's for many different projects, and come in handy.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...k%3Agrk+screws

pcondon 03-04-2014 12:19 PM

At the advice of a local contractor--I glued AND nailed the underlayment into the joists. Surprised he told me this when I found the opposite info online, as he's been doing it a long time. Guess he uses the old train of thought.

Anyways, doing 3/4 unfinished hardwoods on top. Will I be ok or is my house going to crumble to the ground? (that's a joke)

JazMan 03-05-2014 11:53 AM

That's an instinctive way to install underlayment, it's just not the recommended way. I don't know about "old train" and this error should not be a major disaster.

There's "pros" out there that have been doing some things the wrong way, for "30 years, and have never had a problem". In short, how long one has been doing things wrong is not a plus. But again, not a big deal in this case.

Jaz


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