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-   -   Installing engineered flooring in the Philippines (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/installing-engineered-flooring-philippines-38299/)

Flt_Simulation 02-14-2009 03:55 AM

Installing engineered flooring in the Philippines
 
I have another question regarding engineered wood plank flooring.

I want to have engineered wood flooring installed in certain areas of the new house I am having built here in the Philippines. The flooring will be installed over a smooth and level concrete floor.

There is lots of laminate flooring that is available here, but the only real engineered wood (hardwood veneer) flooring planks I have found locally are from China. The box they come in don't even have the name of the company written anywhere on the box ... Just says in big print "Made in China". Also, there is no installation information in the box. The store manger said they are made by a company called Sennor Flooring (sometimes called Sennorwell Flooring) ... Says the flooring is mnufactured on imported German equipment and is coated with German sourced Polyurethane with aluminium oxide surface coating.

I will say this though ... The 36" x 5" planks look good. I don't know the actual thickness of the planks, but the outer veneer is oak (2.75 mm in thickness) and all planks are tongue & groove.

I need to buy enough boxes to cover 1,215 sq. feet ... Cost installed with the underlayment pad is $4,220 ($3.47 per sq foot).

I am a little worried about the guys installing it wrong. Since there is no instructions in the box, do you folks think that they should install it as a "floating" floor, and just glue the sides and ends of the planks where they all butt together?

Again, they said a pad of some kind is part of the purchase price. They will leave about 1/4" - 1/2" space all around the edge of the flooring to allow for expansion. The floor to wall moulding will cover that gap.

Thanks so much for taking the time to read,

Ron
Bacolod City, Philippines

jaros bros. 02-14-2009 09:06 AM

The price sounds kind of low but I don't know how things are priced in the Philippines. Good installers don't need instructions because all laminate flooring is pretty straight forward. Most laminates don't need glue because they have an interlocking edge that keeps them form separating and creates an almost water impermeable joint. Basically the floor contracts and expands with the temperature. If you have heavy furniture and lots of cooling and heating, it will separate.
It's not the greatest type of flooring out there and for good laminate in the US you would be paying at least $5 a square foot uninstalled.

Flt_Simulation 02-14-2009 01:15 PM

jason bros ...

Thank's for the info, but this flooring is not those laminate floor planks that have a photocopy of wood on the surface ... What we are talking about is "Engineered" floor planks that are basically about the same as those laminates your talking about ... but instead of having a fake photocopy of wood on the outer surface .... the outer surface of "engineered" planks have a thin layer of actual hardwood (basically a thin sheet of real wood veneer)

Mudd 02-14-2009 05:19 PM

You're going to have to make a judgement call here.

At my store, the wood floor samples have the installation options on them (glue, nail/staple, and float).

Floating is a good way to install it, but not every engineered floor can be floated. The ones that can be floated tend to have a bigger tongue and deeper groove and fit tighter together than the ones that can't.

The reason this is important is that if the tongue and groove are there more for alignment than strength, and you T&G glue them, there will be more motion at the joints than is good for the floor, and the planks will "hinge" where they meet, peaking edges and breaking up the floor...

The box may not say, and the store that sells the stuff may not really know for sure. You're taking your chances.

Meggie929 05-14-2009 03:48 PM

Wood Floor
 
Your post was dated Feb. 14, 2009. Today is May 14th, I'm wondering if you already had your engineered wood floor installed. I am also going to have a house built in the same area and the reason why I saw your post was because I was searching for hardwood floor retailer in the Philippines. If you don't mind, I would like to ask where in the Philippines you have purchased your wood floor. I want to have solid hardwood floor though but I don't know where in the Philippines I can find it.

Meggie929 05-14-2009 04:06 PM

Installing Engineered Wood Floor
 
Have you checked the moisture content of your wood floor? If you haven't installed your engineered wood floor yet, I think the best way for you to install it is to glue it down to your concrete floor using a urethane wood glue like Bostik's Best. This glue will also serve as the moisture barrier. But before installing your wood floor, make sure that all areas are level. If not, you will have to do some floating or leveling before you can glue down your wood planks. I hope this helps.

Quobetah 07-14-2009 03:55 AM

Elastic Wood floor adhesive: New Tech. Great!
 
You should try out the latest installation technology for wood floors. Its based on i component polyurethane that when fully cured is like rubber. The elsticity of the finished adhesive doubles in as sound deadener ( no squeaks ), compensates for wood expansion ( thermal and hygroscopic ) because its elastic, and the tensile strength is below that of the usual flooring screed so it wont peel off your concrete floor. Since you already have a leveled concrete floor this will be perfect! You just spread over the adhesive on the floor using grooved trowel then stick the wood in. Works great with engineered and solid wood of any size.. Product name is Sikabond T55. Here's the site you might get interested. Sika.com

http://www.ktirio.gr/instore%5CPhoto...s%5C480-20.jpg

Flt_Simulation 07-14-2009 11:15 AM

Well, they finally installed that Engineered flooring in the bedrooms of this new house here in the Philippines.

Here is how they did it:

1. First they installed a thin layer of a poly foam moisture barrier over the concrete slab (I don't have a photo of the foam installed over the slab, but here is a photo of the actual foam sheeting):

http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p158/Turbo6ta/1a.jpg


2. Then they layed 10mm thick marine grade plywood over the foam. They used a large drill with a masonary bit to drill holes through the plywood into the cement below:

http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p158/Turbo6ta/2a.jpg


3. Next they inserted plastic anchors into the holes and pounded screws into the anchors. This attached the plywood to the concrete below very tight:

http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p158/Turbo6ta/4a.jpg


4. Then they glued the back side of the Engineered planks:

http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p158/Turbo6ta/5a.jpg

5. And at last, they used an air powered staple gun to attach the planks to the plywood in the area of the planks tongue & groove (this made the staples hiden from view):

http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p158/Turbo6ta/6a.jpg


All and all, I think the install will work ok ... It seemed like overkill, but I can't see how the planks are ever going to move at all. There certainly secure!

Total cost for everything was 198,000 pesos ($4,125) for 1,200 sq. feet. This included all materials and labor.

Ron,

Meggie929 07-21-2009 09:33 AM

$3.44/sf for labor and materials....that's a very good price.

Flt_Simulation 07-21-2009 07:05 PM

Meggie ...

Installation here is cheap. These installers were each paid 250 pesos per day ($5.21) for 8 hours work by the company that sold us the flooring materials ... Yup, that's .65 cents per hour.

Meggie929 07-21-2009 07:16 PM

I know. I'm very familiar with the labor cost in the Philippines. I plan to build a house in one of the smaller subdivisions in Talisay City, Negros Occidental and had been askin' around for hardwood floor supplier. If you don't mind telling me who your supplier is, I would really appreciate it. Are you going to post more photos of your home while under construction? I'm actually interested on following the developments.

Flt_Simulation 07-21-2009 07:33 PM

Meggie ... Well, were neighbors.

This house is being built in the Ayala North Point subd in Talisay / Bacolod

Ron,

Meggie929 07-21-2009 07:35 PM

I was looking at the last photo and was wonderin' why hammers were used. A rubber mallet should have been used instead of a hammer. Would you mind posting some photos of your wood floor?

Meggie929 07-21-2009 07:36 PM

Hi Ron,

Thanks for the contact numbers. I will call you soon.

Meg

Flt_Simulation 07-21-2009 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Meggie929 (Post 305106)
Are you going to post more photos of your home while under construction? I'm actually interested on following the developments.

The house is not done yet, but here are a few photos:

http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p...rbo6ta/122.jpg

http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p...rbo6ta/120.jpg

http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p...rbo6ta/106.jpg

http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p158/Turbo6ta/d.jpg


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