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Fletchkel 04-27-2011 05:56 PM

Installing engineered flooring
 
I removed ceramic tile from a sunroom and want to replace it w/ engineered flooring. I don't want to have to grind off the thinset morter left from the tile. I was thinking about either 1. Laying down a 1/4 felt to take up the uneveness and then put down a 1/4" plywood subfloor or 2. Level the floor with leveling compound and then putting down the plywood. If I go with option #2, would I have to float the finished floor?

Bud Cline 04-27-2011 06:39 PM

Quote:

I was thinking about either 1. Laying down a 1/4 felt to take up the uneveness and then put down a 1/4" plywood subfloor
Okay let's think that through for a minute. How's that gonna work? No really, how is it?:)

Quote:

2. Level the floor with leveling compound and then putting down the plywood.
And again, still thinking things through...
How would the plywood be fastened to the new concrete?

Quote:

I don't want to have to grind off the thinset morter left from the tile.
That is really the only way.:) It's not a big deal.:)

Fletchkel 04-28-2011 10:51 AM

Felt underlayment
 
My question about laying plywood over a leveling compound was not too bright. However, why wouldn't the thick felt (maybe even 1/8") serve to fill between the morter stryations and give a reasonably flat, stable surface to a plywood topping?

Bud Cline 04-28-2011 09:21 PM

You seem determined...Go for it!:)

IceT 05-05-2011 11:20 AM

Despite the Cline thought process, I do agree that the removal of the mortar is the best way.. but not the only way.

Yes, you could level the flooring with floor leveling compound and float the wood over that.

Yes, you could use a foam/felt underlayment to over the difference, but it would not be covered under most warranties and that is what Mr Cline was most likely thinking. HOWEVER, in RARE cases that is option that can work. Though NOT the best option. Meaning you may have issues if you don't fall into a window of what is ok. So what would make the difference? They selection of the wood, A wider plank, or a 3 strip product would work better, Thicker in this case is also better, 9/16" or thicker. Also the mortar should be very even on the existing area. Why would you do this? Only if the other options are not possible for whatever reason.


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