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-   -   How do you install laminate flooring under door casings? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/how-do-you-install-laminate-flooring-under-door-casings-74233/)

Player 06-21-2010 12:05 AM

How do you install laminate flooring under door casings?
 
Hi, I'm planning on installing laminate flooring later this week and have a quandary that I hope someone can assist me with. The laminate flooring will be running lengthwise down a hall which has two doors on either side and one at the end. How do you get the laminate under the door casings when it needs to click together (to the other pieces of laminate)? Seems somewhat impossible. I'm not sure how to do this on either side, particularly the last side (final row in the hallway). Certainly this is done every day. Anyone have any laminate flooring install hints/tips or tricks? I've heard of some who cut off the tongues and glue the pieces together. This seems somewhat sub par. I would imagine that the experts have some secrets...I'd love to be let in on them. :thumbsup:

Thanks!

slickgt1 06-22-2010 11:23 AM

There are different ways. You can place the plank further down the line, and then just move it back under the door moulding. Not sure if this is what you are asking about.

Depending on your trim, you can remove it and put back.

Player 06-22-2010 12:47 PM

What do you mean by "further down the line?"

I'm just trying to figure out how to get it to all click together when it appears impossible since you have to slide it under the casing. Such as the when a seam is under the door casing, leading into a closet. Or when your last row needs to run under a door casing. How do you do it? Is the only option to cut and paste (cut the locking part of the tongue and glue the pieces together)? Or is there a better way?

liquidvw 06-22-2010 01:40 PM

I just installed my first floor last week. I had the same issue. I need to get the floor under the door jam. I took a piece of wood and put it next to the jam. Then I used an under cut saw to make a cut in the jam. The wood slid right under the jam and looks great.

Here is a pic of it.
http://www.phototiki.com/images/user...0feeaf6e13.jpg

slickgt1 06-22-2010 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Player (Post 459803)
What do you mean by "further down the line?"

I'm just trying to figure out how to get it to all click together when it appears impossible since you have to slide it under the casing. Such as the when a seam is under the door casing, leading into a closet. Or when your last row needs to run under a door casing. How do you do it? Is the only option to cut and paste (cut the locking part of the tongue and glue the pieces together)? Or is there a better way?

I may be thinking of something else other than what you need.

Look at the picture above, is this the direction of the floor you have? Or to you have it along the door, basically parallell to the door when door is closed.

The above poster made a transition board. He needed that to make the floor in the other room from the beginning. What you can do is, make a double tongue on a table saw, glue that into the groove, and you can reverse the flooring to go into two directions past the door, making one continuous floor.

Hard to explain without seeing it. I just don't take pics when doing this stuff.

Player 06-22-2010 03:10 PM

Yeah, it's running parallel to the door/hallway, as opposed to the picture above. I understand to undercut the casing. I could set it up to do exactly as you described with the double tongue (or just click it into place the opposite way...that would work also), but what about when I reach the other side of the hallway and can't do that process on those doorways? On those doorways I would need to click it into place but can't because it needs to slide under the casing (thus preventing it from rotating at all to achieve the "click"). Even if I slide it under the casing and try to glue the previous piece/row to it, I'm not sure how I could do that since there won't be enough room to slide the piece of laminate that is under the casing forward and out of the way of the tongue from the previous piece so that I can slide the tongue into the groove. Does that make sense?

slickgt1 06-23-2010 09:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Player (Post 459884)
Yeah, it's running parallel to the door/hallway, as opposed to the picture above. I understand to undercut the casing. I could set it up to do exactly as you described with the double tongue (or just click it into place the opposite way...that would work also), but what about when I reach the other side of the hallway and can't do that process on those doorways? On those doorways I would need to click it into place but can't because it needs to slide under the casing (thus preventing it from rotating at all to achieve the "click"). Even if I slide it under the casing and try to glue the previous piece/row to it, I'm not sure how I could do that since there won't be enough room to slide the piece of laminate that is under the casing forward and out of the way of the tongue from the previous piece so that I can slide the tongue into the groove. Does that make sense?

Got you now.

Couple of ways here.
You can cut out the peice with a coping saw, but you won't be able to get it really tight around the casing as you still need to roate it. I have seen people use color matching caulk to fill in the gaps by the casing. I don't like it, looks like an afterthought

My personal preference would be to trim the groove bottom edge so that there is no twisting required (might have to do this on the tongue too, just shave it basically). Put some PL Premium into the grove and use a peice of scrap wood against the plank and hammer it in flat on the floor. Don't hammer against the plank, you will damage it. Once the PL sets, trust me that seam will never come apart even if you wanted it to.

Player 06-23-2010 01:49 PM

Thanks, Slickgt1! So you're saying to trim the bottom of the groove (and possible the tongue) to allow it to slide under the casing, tightly, then tap it back into place on the tongue and groove that is remaining? Or were you saying to carefully tap it down from the top so that it is flat/flush?

Is PL Premium better than Titebond wood glue that I've seen others recommend? Will it wipe off of the surface without a problem (when first applied)? And would you use this between seems in a kitchen, or is that overkill on a 12mm, quality laminate?

slickgt1 06-24-2010 08:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Player (Post 460421)
Thanks, Slickgt1! So you're saying to trim the bottom of the groove (and possible the tongue) to allow it to slide under the casing, tightly, then tap it back into place on the tongue and groove that is remaining?

-Correct, this is the way.


Or were you saying to carefully tap it down from the top so that it is flat/flush?

-No, if doing this, you will have gaps by the casing, and it won't have the structural tongue and groove.

Is PL Premium better than Titebond wood glue that I've seen others recommend? Will it wipe off of the surface without a problem (when first applied)? And would you use this between seems in a kitchen, or is that overkill on a 12mm, quality laminate?

I prefer PL Premium on most jobs like this. I only use wood glue when gluing solid, natural wood peices that have good surface contact. Here you don't know where the glue will work in the groove. PL will be thicker, and it will bond to anything.

If you need to wipe down PL, use a rag with Paint Thinner. Don't let the excess dry, it will stick to your finish on the floor, hard core. Just don't over-do-it when using it, put the PL stricktly in the groove.

I wouldn't use it to seal gaps / seems either. Don't use it on areas that you don't need to. You are still working with a product that will expand and contract with climate / humidity shifts. The floor needs to be able to shift around. If something spills in the kitchen, just wipe it off, and you will be fine. I've seen tests of laminate flooring performing better and more resilient than hardwood.

Player 07-01-2010 03:40 AM

Thanks! The supplier is recommending Titebond, but I'm inclined to use PL Premium as I'm not actually gluing wood.

Player 07-06-2010 01:27 PM

How would the track for a sliding closet door be installed over laminate? The track really only prevents the sliding door from floating (or being pushed) in or out. There is no weight on it. Can I screw that into laminate, or do I need to do something else there?

liquidvw 07-06-2010 01:44 PM

I would predrill the floor. Then screw down into the sub floor.

Player 07-06-2010 03:23 PM

Wouldn't that prohibit the floating aspect of the floating floor? So that it couldn't adjust to changes in temperature and humidity?

liquidvw 07-07-2010 07:15 AM

good point. :thumbsup:

But if the bracket moves the doors may not work correctly.

btme 07-07-2010 09:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Player (Post 463846)
Thanks! The supplier is recommending Titebond, but I'm inclined to use PL Premium as I'm not actually gluing wood.

Titebond II is the one I would use... Titebond II Premium (which resist moisture and is $3.50 for an 8 oz bottle at Home Depot) is more than enough... I used it before and it is plenty strong!

Laminate is WOOD... and that will do the job!

Make sure you plane/shave off equally the Groove and the Tongue; and you should have no problems.

Also make sure every thing in that row fits properly before applying the glue!
Any oozing /excess glue from the seam can be easily removed-cleaned with a moist rag !


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