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bradleybunch 07-25-2008 11:25 PM

Help removing carpet padding!
 
I was wondering if anyone has ripped up carpet in a basement bedroom and found that the carpet pad is glued down. I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on how to get up the remainder of the patches of carpet and glue, WITHOUT using any harsh chemicals, if that is even possible?? Any advice at all would be appreciated! Thanks!

Bud Cline 07-25-2008 11:53 PM

Scrape it up, it's done every day.:)

bradleybunch 07-26-2008 12:21 AM

No kidding, that is what I have been doing, but it is not coming up so good...obviously, or I wouldn't be asking this question!! I will be there forever..I was wondering if anyone out there (excluding the smart guy who replied) had any good hints or tips on how to remove the excess carpet pad and glue a little easier than what I have been doing. Even by scraping it, it is not all going to come up.

Nestor_Kelebay 07-26-2008 12:27 AM

Tanya:

I'm not going to presume you already know what to "scrape it up" with.

Go to your local home center, and ask if they sell these:

http://www.carpettool.net/350-360.jpg

You'll find them either in the flooring aisle being sold as a floor scraper, or in the paint and wallpaper department being sold as a wallpaper scraper.

If you can't find cheap ones in your local home center, then phone up any carpet retailer and ask to speak to their installations manager. Ask him who sells flooring installation supplies in your area. Go to that store and ask for a Crain or Gundlach floor scraper. Buy the one with three screws in the head rather than just one or two.

Also, when you buy them, the blade in the scraper will be inserted backwards so that people don't get cut handling them. You need to reverse the blade before using it.

Also, buy plenty of spare blades. These tools work best with a sharp blade, and scraping anything off a concrete floor tends to dull the blades quickly.

That's the tool you need to remove the underpad quickly and easily. If the flooring scraper doesn't remove the adhesive used to glue the underpad down, then you'll need to resort to solvents if you want to remove that adhesive.

bradleybunch 07-26-2008 12:33 AM

Thank you not only for the serious reply, but for the helpful info!! I have been using just a sharp paint scraper, but I will try your recommendations. I really don't want to resort to solvents, but if this doesn't work, then what kind of "solvents" do I use? I have been told acetone?? Does that sound right? AND, I have been told that my children will have to leave, like for overnight at least and it will take two people and it is very harmful if inhaled and to wear a mask, etc. etc. Any suggestions here?

HAARDOESIT 07-26-2008 01:01 AM

If none of this works use a 4 1/2 inch grinder with some 80 or more course grit wheel. You will not need to use any chemicals, but you may need some elboe grese.

Nestor_Kelebay 07-26-2008 01:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradleybunch (Post 143146)
Thank you not only for the serious reply, but for the helpful info!! I have been using just a sharp paint scraper, but I will try your recommendations. I really don't want to resort to solvents, but if this doesn't work, then what kind of "solvents" do I use? I have been told acetone?? Does that sound right? AND, I have been told that my children will have to leave, like for overnight at least and it will take two people and it is very harmful if inhaled and to wear a mask, etc. etc. Any suggestions here?

Bradley Bunch:

You can usually remove adhesives with a heat gun. When adhesives get hot, they also get soft so that you can scrape them off easily. You can buy a heat gun for anything from $29 to $290. Any carpet store will have installers working out of it, and every one of them will own a heat gun. Perhaps offer a damage deposit to the installation manager to borrow a heat gun just to see how well it works in removing that adhesive.

If the heat gun idea isn't feasible, and you're left with only the solvent option, then I would try acetone, lacquer thinner, mineral spirits (also known as paint thinner) and just water. Apply the solvent in a small area of about 6 to 8 square feet and cover with wax paper to prevent the solvent from evaporating. Feel the wax paper to see if the adhesive trowel ridges under it are softening. If so, allow more time for them to soften, and slowly pull back the wax paper while scraping the old adhesive up with a putty knife (or any suitable scraping tool).

Obviously, only use solvents with plenty of ventilation. And, if you start to feel light headed or dizzy, take a breather outside for a while.

You were misinformed about acetone. My understanding is that acetone is potentially less harmful to your health than other volatile solvents.

I have come across lots of MSDS web pages that claimed that you could potentially die from inhaling solvent vapours at or above the lower explosion limit. However, I have never seen any web site that claims there is any PERMANENT health risks from inhaling solvent vapours at the low concentrations needed to make a person feel light headed or dizzy. Those concentrations are typically in the 500 to 1000 parts per million range, whereas the vapour concentration needed to cause an explosion is typically well above 20,000 parts per million. My understanding is that the light headedness one feels from breathing in solvent vapours is entirely temporary in nature and has no permanent health effects.

(If anyone can link to a reliable and authoritave web site that says that inhaling low concentrations of solvents (less than 1000 ppm) has any long term health effects, please correct me AND provide a link to that site.)

Bud Cline 07-26-2008 11:04 AM

Your question was:

Quote:

I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on how to get up the remainder of the patches of carpet and glue, WITHOUT using any harsh chemicals, if that is even possible??
You didn't say you had been trying it with an improper tool. You didn't say you had to have your hand held every step of the away.:no:

I think the use of solvents is very dangerous and should never be used for this type of task and especially indoors. I get the feeling however because I strongly recommend against it that that will be your next choice of action so maybe this will help you:


Use Solvents Safely

Solvents are substances used to dissolve another substance. They are commonly used in the workplace to thin paints, clean greasy surfaces and do many other jobs. All industrial solvents are potentially hazardous. They can catch fire or explode and they can cause illness or injury upon exposure to the human body. Solvents can enter the body by absorption, inhalation or digestion.

Here are some guidelines for working safely around solvents:
  • Wear the correct Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) when working with solvents. You may be required to wear splash-proof eye protection, a specific respirator, special gloves and chemical-resistant clothing.
  • Keep solvents away from any sources of ignition. Heaters, sparks from grinding operations and cigarettes are ignition sources, which, must be avoided. Solvents are usually combustible or flammable liquids. This means their vapors can catch fire. A fire can follow these vapors back to the source container and cause a major fire or explosion.
  • Read the label and the Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) before using any solvent. Learn what precautions you should take, and what to do in case of an emergency.
  • Do not use solvents to wash your skin. Solvents remove the natural oils from the skin and leave it susceptible to long-term irritation and infection. These skin conditions can become chronic. Solvents can also be absorbed through the skin into the bloodstream and cause damage to internal organs.
  • Any used solvents, as well as rags and papers containing solvents, must be kept in approved fireproof covered containers and emptied each day.
  • Avoid inhaling solvents. In case of exposure, leave the contaminated space or ventilate the area to bring in fresh air. Call for medical help.
  • Do not use solvents to clean your clothing. Solvent-soaked clothing can be ignited by a heat source such as a clothes dryer. Do not carry solvent-soaked rags in your pockets.If solvents get onto your clothes while you are wearing them, change them as soon as possible. Continuing to wear them can result in the blistering or burning of your skin.
  • Know the location of the nearest eyewash station, and how to use it in case of an accidental splash of solvent to the eye. Flush your eye for 20 minutes with water in case of a chemical splash.
  • If a solvent is splashed onto your skin, wash thoroughly with soap and water, but do not scrub the skin.
  • Do not keep surplus supplies of solvents at your workstation.

Choose the least harmful solvent for the task you are doing.Solvents are useful, commonly used substances. But they have hazards - so use them with care.

-borrowwed from the Internet

poppameth 07-26-2008 11:20 AM

Henry makes a flooring adhesive stripper that works very well. I think it's called easy adhesive remover. Lowes is suppose to sell it but not all locations have it. It comes in quart bottles that you dilute with water and apply to the floor. The glue will let loose very quickly with this stuff and it is not a harsh chemical cocktail. Finding it will be your only problem.

Looks like Ace has it now too.
http://www.acehardware.com/sm-henry-...i-2923542.html

bradleybunch 07-26-2008 11:47 AM

Thank you to all of the helpful replies. I assumed this "chat" room was to ask questions, especially for those who are novices. Apparently, SOME ONE, (I think we all know who) insists on being abnoxious and rude every time he posts a reply. I don't need my "hand held every step of the way" but some informed decisions is always a good idea. OH, and by the way, check your spelling smart guy. :no: I don't need or want any more of your replies, thanks anyway. As far as everyone else, THANK YOU!! YOUR information was EXTREMELY helpful!! I will let you guys know how things go.

747 07-26-2008 12:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradleybunch (Post 143139)
I was wondering if anyone has ripped up carpet in a basement bedroom and found that the carpet pad is glued down. I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on how to get up the remainder of the patches of carpet and glue, WITHOUT using any harsh chemicals, if that is even possible?? Any advice at all would be appreciated! Thanks!

Yes i have done that. I have a den that is cement floor carpet over it. The pad was glued down. Had to scrap. It wasnt a bad job. Just pull up what you can and get scrap the floor with a pole scraper then vacuum with a wet dry vacuum which i had in the garage. Then lowes showed up installed the new carpet and it looked great.

Nestor_Kelebay 07-26-2008 01:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradleybunch (Post 143223)
Thank you to all of the helpful replies. I assumed this "chat" room was to ask questions, especially for those who are novices. Apparently, SOME ONE, (I think we all know who) insists on being abnoxious and rude every time he posts a reply. I don't need my "hand held every step of the way" but some informed decisions is always a good idea. OH, and by the way, check your spelling smart guy. :no: I don't need or want any more of your replies, thanks anyway. As far as everyone else, THANK YOU!! YOUR information was EXTREMELY helpful!! I will let you guys know how things go.


BradleyBunch:

Believe it or not, what we're tripping over here is probably one of the oldest and most common problems in communication. And that is, if something is obvious to you, your brain presumes it's obvious to everyone else, too. One of the most difficult things we can do is anticipate questions if those questions aren't questions in our own minds.

I wish I had a nickel for every time someone asked a question like: "I'm installing tile and I'm wondering how to cut it to fit a corner."

Of course, to you and I the obvious questions are: What kind of tile? Ceramic floor tiles, ceramic wall tiles, vinyl composition tiles, Peel & Stick?Also, inside or outside corner, or even a corner that isn't a right angle?

Yet the truth is that people asking questions won't even realize they haven't fully described the problem until we point out the ambiguities. And the reason why of course, is that those points were never ambiguous to them. They knew what kind of tile and what kind of corner, and presumed we would too.

What happened here is just another classic example of something being blindingly obvious to one person (that you typically would use a flooring scraper to scrape stuff off a floor) not being at all obvious to another (who was logically using a paint scraper instead).

Home repairs and renovations can be frustrating at best at times, and problems with communication only serve to exacerbate the situation, and that can lead to anger.

PS: BradleyBunch:
Using strong solvents is never healthy for anyone, but if you provide good ventilation, do it with common sense (such as following the procedures that Bud Cline posted in red), and get some fresh air and allow the ventilation to clear the room air if you start feeling light headed, then you can use strong solvents like acetone and lacquer thinner with a good degree of safety. You do not need to send your kids to grandma's house or work with a buddy who can drag you out of the room if you lose consiousness or wear a gas mask or any of that stuff. You just need to be aware of what you're doing, keep in mind any open flames that could potentially ignite the solvent you're using and provide the best ventilation of the workplace that you reasonably can. Generally speaking, as long as you remain consious, the vapour concentration in the air you're breathing is well below the lower flammable limit, and any kind of explosion caused by turning on a light or using an electric tool is extremely unlikely.

Still, maybe try using a heat gun to remove most of the glue, and only use strong solvents to remove the residue. That may be more to your liking.

Bud Cline 07-26-2008 02:32 PM

Quote:

Thank you to all of the helpful replies. I assumed this "chat" room was to ask questions, especially for those who are novices. Apparently, SOME ONE, (I think we all know who) insists on being abnoxious and rude every time he posts a reply. I don't need my "hand held every step of the way" but some informed decisions is always a good idea.

Quote:

OH, and by the way, check your spelling smart guy. :no: I don't need or want any more of your replies, thanks anyway. As far as everyone else, THANK YOU!! YOUR information was EXTREMELY helpful!! I will let you guys know how things go.
"Check my spelling"?
Shouldn't your "abnoxious" be spelled obnoxious?
I see I'm not the only one that can make spelling errors!:)

See, you do need your hand held!:)

HomeDepot23 07-26-2008 02:51 PM

Hey Bud Cline.

You're just racking up friends as fast as a Home Depot associate. :thumbsup:

Nestor_Kelebay 07-26-2008 03:40 PM

Isn't it great when something comes full circle, just like the love in this thread.

C'mon everyone now, big group hug!

:laughing:


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