DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Flooring (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/)
-   -   Help - remodeling kitchen floor (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/help-remodeling-kitchen-floor-121374/)

Sephora 10-26-2011 11:46 AM

Help - remodeling kitchen floor
 
5 Attachment(s)
Ok, so I thought I had a plan but not sure now.

Basic Rundown:
  • Moved into house that already had Pergo Laminate Wood floors in kitchen
  • Knew the Pergo was over old flooring as it was a slight slope up into kitchen
  • A year ago got new cabinets and coutnertops
  • Took out a small wall of heat to make room for new section of cabinets
  • Did NOT remove any section of the floor to add new cabinets
Now, we want to rip up the old floor (s) and start from scratch - planning to lay down tile.

So Fri we plan to get up the laminate...I already tested a section and they were def locked in and not glue down. I don't forsee a major headache getting the Pergo up. The only issue is that we need to cut around the new section of cabinets - fine.

However...we would like to get all the old flooring up as we would like to have a smoother transition from front hall/dining room real hardwood floors. :Read: we would like it to be flush.

So all is fine and dandy BUT how is this going to pan out once remove everything? How is the title going to look against the new section of cabinets since i need to cut around them? The new toe kick on cabinets is the actual cabinet and wood...which I want to keep. I'd rather not have to put a rubber piece along the toe kick to hide anything.

See pics:

1: Old kitchen
2: New kitchen in progess
3: New cabinets
4: New section of cabiets
5: Toe-kick area (pardon my lovely daughter)

I guess my ultimate concern is that I don't want a gap inbetween the floor and the bottom of the cabinet toe-kick.

Sephora 10-27-2011 06:59 AM

Thinking about it last night....I am either going to have to build the floor back up or try to find a small piece of moulding.....

Snav 10-27-2011 07:12 AM

You're daughter's adorable.
Your kitchen's looking fabulous!

so you're going to lay down laminate? How thick is it? Is it in sheet that rolls on and lays out - or is it tiles?

Regardless: if it's thin laminate I'd say to apply it over your existing flooring.

Per the un-eveness between the rooms - how is it uneven? If you removed the pergo would it bring down the floor to be flush? OR would removing the pergo make it not-flush?

If you remove - and cut around the cabinets - just install a small, thin (doesn't have to be a quarter-round like you had before) molding that's stained to match your cabinets or that contrasts with them to conceal the edge of this wood.

Sephora 10-27-2011 07:30 AM

Snav, I am tearing up the Pergo and whatever else is under (1-2 layers of old linoluem it seems) and want to install tile.

This is the tile I will be putting down: 12x12 Rialto Noce

http://www.lowes.com/SearchCatalogDi...d=10051&rpp=24

http://images.lowes.com/product/conv...41131994sm.jpg

Sephora 10-27-2011 07:35 AM

Also, the floor now in kitchen is higher up cause the Pergo was installed over whatever old stuff. I don't mind if the tile is higher but I def want to get down as much as we can so that it isn't too high. Remember, thinset, hardiboard or Ditra, thinset, tile...that all adds height!

Snav 10-27-2011 09:09 AM

Rialto Noce is pretty - I almost put that in our bathroom but my husband insisted we go with a blue.

It's hard to tell - right now - what type of height difference you're going to come to. Who knows what's under those layers: you might find hidden treasures like I did such as layers of 1/4" wallboard sandwiched underneath different layers of flooring material to make it 'flush' :laughing:

Once you remove the flooring - then assess . . . if your tile is lower then you can hide the exposed wood-floor edge under the cabinets with a small trim.

If it's higher then that gives you just the lip at the doorway to deal with which can be done nicely with a door-transitional T or other such shape.

Just throwing this out as an alternative to buying what can be highly expensive door-transitions:
When I redid our bathroom I ended up with a raised area at the doorway between the bathroom and bedroom - since it was wide (because it traversed what use to be a wall) I sculpted my own floor transitional piece out of pine which matched our trim. . . took some time - but it was wide enough to cover the area and I used a sander to shape it so it was smooth and gradual one surface to another

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g2...to10270902.jpg
http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g2...10270902_1.jpg

Bud Cline 10-27-2011 10:12 AM

Sephora,

Before this thread gets out of hand with wild speculations and assumptions like a lot of them have seemed to do lately, do this.

Remove everything you are going to remove first. Keep in mind that a rigid tile installation requires a substantial subfloor. Remove the laminate, remove any vinyl below it. Sometimes vinyl installations include a 1/4" plywood underlayment installation also. If so, remove that too. Take it down to the basic subfloor and then come back with descriptions and photos and any variance measurements you may have. We can start from there. Only then will you have a clear picture of what needs to be done.

Chances are your tile installation components will rise above any ragged remnants that will be remaining below the cabinet toe-kicks and there won't be a problem at all to deal with. All of this wondering and wandering is counter-productive at this time.:yes:

Sephora 10-27-2011 10:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline (Post 757925)
Sephora,

Before this thread gets out of hand with wild speculations and assumptions like a lot of them have seemed to do lately, do this.

Remove everything you are going to remove first. Keep in mind that a rigid tile installation requires a substantial subfloor. Remove the laminate, remove any vinyl below it. Sometimes vinyl installations include a 1/4" plywood underlayment installation also. If so, remove that too. Take it down to the basic subfloor and then come back with descriptions and photos and any variance measurements you may have. We can start from there. Only then will you have a clear picture of what needs to be done.

Chances are your tile installation components will rise above any ragged remnants that will be remaining below the cabinet toe-kicks and there won't be a problem at all to deal with. All of this wondering and wandering is counter-productive at this time.:yes:

Thanks Bud...was waiting for you to reply :) We start tomorrow AM with the rip up....will post again what we find. Good news is my BIL does tile on the side (finance by day, tiler by night - his dad has a tile co and he quickly learned) and he and my sister literally just built their house. He is going to let me borrow his tile saw and wanted to come over after we ripped up the floor to assess the situation as well.

Bud Cline 10-27-2011 10:58 AM

Quote:

...and wanted to come over after we ripped up the floor to assess the situation as well.
There ya go. He knows!:)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:08 PM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved