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7 VII 7 02-26-2013 10:35 AM

Hardwood Flooring Pricing and Install
 
Wife and I have parquet floors in our formal living room and dining room that we want to get replaced with different hardwoods. We are on a concrete slab and the floors are currently glued down.

We have met with 4 companies about getting those floors taken up and put new hardwood floors down. I am getting told and believe that getting the new floors down on the concrete would be best with glue rather than floating floors.

We are looking at Maple since we love the color and it is lighter than all the Oak's we have found. The total sqft is about 387 sqft and they are both rectangle without odd angles. We are looking at engineered hardwood flooring and not solid or laminate.

The quote we have been getting for demo, labor, tax and product has been in the $4600 range for Maple. The product ranges from Mannington, Mohawk, Mercier and Shaw.

Is that a good price or are we being overcharged? Also what kind of wiggle/negotiations would be possible?

We are located in the DC Metro Area so not sure if that means it would be more expensive but just thought I would mention.

Seattle2k 02-26-2013 02:29 PM

It seems like a high price to me, but the real question...is $4000 worth it to you? How much is your time worth, if you were to do it yourself? Keep in mind, doing it yourself requires lots of tools.

Prices are going to vary in different areas of the county. How many estimates have you gotten? Get at least 3 estimates from different companies. That should give you a solid idea of a fair price.

Getting the old floor up and the old glue removed is going to be a lot of work, which can require special equipment (though, it can usually be rented).

Also, it's usually advised to put down a urethane moisture barrier, before gluing down hardwood to concrete, so factor in that cost.

7 VII 7 02-26-2013 08:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seattle2k (Post 1125433)
It seems like a high price to me, but the real question...is $4000 worth it to you? How much is your time worth, if you were to do it yourself? Keep in mind, doing it yourself requires lots of tools.

Prices are going to vary in different areas of the county. How many estimates have you gotten? Get at least 3 estimates from different companies. That should give you a solid idea of a fair price.

Getting the old floor up and the old glue removed is going to be a lot of work, which can require special equipment (though, it can usually be rented).

Also, it's usually advised to put down a urethane moisture barrier, before gluing down hardwood to concrete, so factor in that cost.

That is the thing, I have a 3 month old, work full time and go to school. So time is not on my side. I have gotten quotes from multiple places but it is tough when some carry Mannington and some carry Mohawk and some carry something else. We found one we LOVE but not sure if I like the fact that it is not the thickest engineered hardwood.

DannyT 02-26-2013 08:29 PM

you can get the cost of the floor from many places online and compare to the price you got to see how much they are making for labor and markup. I bought 3/4 solid brazillian tigerwood for just over 4.00 a square foot. like was already mentioned labor varies from region to region but 15 dollars a square foot sounds kinda high to me. If they bring a crew and know what they are doing they should only be there 2 days, one day to demo and one day to install. # days at the most. but what it comes down to is it worth it to you. if you get 3 estimates and they are all in the same ballpark then that's the going rate for your area.

JazMan 02-26-2013 10:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DannyT
like was already mentioned labor varies from region to region but 15 dollars a square foot sounds kinda high to me.

Let's see. Almost 400 ft. (not sure if waste is included though), and the total price is $4,600. So, where does $15 a sq. ft. enter into this?

Quote:

Originally Posted by 7 VII 7
We are located in the DC Metro Area so not sure if that means it would be more expensive

Well sure it's gonna cost a little more there than some other areas for obvious reasons. But it's still gonna be very competitive and you need to know the installer is highly skilled. There's hacks there too.

Jaz

ThatDaveGuy 02-27-2013 06:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 1125793)
Well sure it's gonna cost a little more there than some other areas for obvious reasons. But it's still gonna be very competitive and you need to know the installer is highly skilled. There's hacks there too.

Jaz

As usual JazMan put his finger on the heart of the matter, you shouldn't be shopping by price, you ought to be looking at quality and getting your moneysworth. You're looking to upgrade a major part of your home, especially with a young child that is going to be crawling around on it. Experienced crew that does it all, does it right, does it right the first time to your (and more importantly, to your spouses) satisfaction, in and out and clean and done............. that's money well spent.

Often that 10% you save up front costs you stress later, the deal you need to find is not about $$$.

JazMan 02-27-2013 12:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ThatDaveGuy
you shouldn't be shopping by price, you ought to be looking at quality and getting your moneysworth.

Many people are very bad shoppers, but it's understandable when buying labor for a home improvement project. How do you compare the quality of the installation when there's so many variables? Some people buy a remodel like they'd purchase a flat screen or a car. You obviously can't do that.

Jaz

7 VII 7 02-27-2013 02:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 1126063)
Many people are very bad shoppers, but it's understandable when buying labor for a home improvement project. How do you compare the quality of the installation when there's so many variables? Some people buy a remodel like they'd purchase a flat screen or a car. You obviously can't do that.

Jaz

That is a great way to look at it. We got recommended this company by a friend that is an electrician that they get a lot of work done though. They also do a lot of restore work and insurance claims for properties.

But how do you really know a company will do great work?

DannyT 02-27-2013 02:54 PM

oops bad math. 11.50 sq ft. ask for references also

ThatDaveGuy 02-28-2013 05:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 1126063)
Many people are very bad shoppers, but it's understandable when buying labor for a home improvement project. How do you compare the quality of the installation when there's so many variables? Some people buy a remodel like they'd purchase a flat screen or a car. You obviously can't do that.

Jaz

Well put Jazman, as much as I understand that we all have to look at that bottom line, home improvements are just different. In my experience the tradesmen I've known that genuinely excel enjoy doing their work and are proud to show it off. They want you to be one of those clients recommending them to others so they stay busy, make good money and can choose their jobs.

7 VII 7, I always try to see their previous work if possible and talk with others that recommend them, yes it involves a little more time and effort but anything else is a crapshoot.

JazMan 02-28-2013 01:26 PM

Hiring someone to do remodeling is not easy. I've seen work done by people that were referred by happy relatives and other trusted tradesmen that although may have looked fine, was really not fine at all. Showers come to mind where most in my area are built wrong. The part that isn't done right doesn't show, so no one knows until you have a leak or cracks or mold etc.

Built wrong by plumbers mostly, since the pans are usually done wrong. Modernization guys are forced to do work out of their realm of knowledge. I've found most remodeling people start out as carpenters. They end up doing work like plumbing, tilework and minor electrical to keep the job going and to make a living. Those looking for cheap prices often end up with faulty work of some type.

The secret I guess is for the customer to educate themselves so they learn how things should be done. Hire experienced licensed people that are reputable and have been around a long time. Take out permits when required and be safe.

Jaz

Sharp Floor 02-28-2013 04:52 PM

Take the Average Priced Floor Company (not lowest)
 
I agree. That's all we can do. Shop around and become as educated on the how to of it all and ensure the company has their permits and licenses. If a company seems to be doing it for a significantly lower cost than the average of other company's, you probably don't want to use them. Go with a company that charges the average price and has good references. Best if you can find a trusted friend/neighbor who can refer you.

James Sharp (www.sharp-floors.com) :thumbsup::thumbup:

repairlady 03-06-2013 12:41 PM

My suggestion is that you make sure your price is broken out: cost for wood; cost of demo of current floor coverings; cost to install; cost to move furniture; cost of vapor/moisture barrier, quarter round, etc. I had several quotes that were lump sum prices with nothing itemized and I rejected those. I believe once you see the pricing broken out it will make a little more sense.

rosem637 03-06-2013 12:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by repairlady (Post 1131116)
I had several quotes that were lump sum prices with nothing itemized and I rejected those.

Wow. Glad to see someone thinks like me. When we hire contractors(roofing, concrete, flooring, electrical) we always ask that the quote be broken down into total parts cost and then labor. Not itemized like you suggest just a total parts price. I brought this up in the below electrical thread and got creamed.

http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/quote...itches-173108/

repairlady 03-06-2013 01:33 PM

Rosem637: There is major detail in having a floor removed and replaced and I'm sure the same applies to electrical. I had a contractor quote a lump sum price and when I asked about furniture removal it was not included; when I asked about quarter round it was not included, etc. And his quote was 40% higher. I cannot imagine that a contractor would not want to list exactly what is expected of them for a certain price.


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