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Old 03-10-2014, 02:02 PM   #1
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


Hi everyone,

My husband and I just purchased all new red oak engineered hardwood flooring for our entire home (minus the bathrooms). This flooring can be installed either with staples or by gluing the tongue and groove part of the flooring. We are just looking for opinions as to which installation method would be better and give the best results. The flooring that we purchased is 3/8" x 3" and, like I said, it's an engineered red oak. We have hired a contractor from a flooring company to install it for us. He said that he has installed these types of floors both ways with good results and is willing to install it whichever way we prefer, so we're just looking for opinions on gluing versus stapling. From what I understand, if we go with the glue method, the floor cannot be walked on for about 24 hours after being put down, which seems like kind of a pain, especially since we have pets. Any advice would be much appreciated!

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Old 03-10-2014, 02:24 PM   #2
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


Hi,

While I cannot give you any answers on the question you asked I'd like to offer some unsolicited advice.

Although the hardwood in the kitchen may look and feel lovely, use extreme caution around water sources.

I woke up to a few litres of water on the floor from a leaking water bottle. The floor buckled and is now ruined. Out it is coming and porcelain is being installed.

Keep the dishwasher in good repair and hopefully your kitchen floor will last for years

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Old 03-10-2014, 02:27 PM   #3
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


We already have hardwood in our kitchen, which was there even before we bought our house 6 years ago and have never had any problems. We are only replacing it because we want something different and new. The flooring we are installing is engineered, so it has a much higher moisture resistance than regular wood, so we are not worried. We also don't have one of those water bottles in our kitchen.

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Old 03-10-2014, 08:59 PM   #4
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


I installed an engineered hardwood floor the same dimensions as your new floor. I used staples and have had no problems. The floor was installed in about 2002.
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Old 03-10-2014, 09:02 PM   #5
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


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I installed an engineered hardwood floor the same dimensions as your new floor. I used staples and have had no problems. The floor was installed in about 2002.
Thanks! That's really good to know! We were leaning more towards staples. The store we bought the flooring from highly recommended glue, but that seems like a lot more work and seems like it would take a lot longer to have installed if we went that route. On top of that, we wouldn't be able to walk on it for 24 hours to let it fully dry, which would be nearly impossible with us, especially with having cats and dogs.
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Old 03-11-2014, 05:51 AM   #6
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


Most of these floors can be installed three ways. Staples are the easiest and work fine. Floating (gluing the edges) is another, which is much more time consuming and labor intensive. The main advantage here is how easily you can rip it out later, though stapled isn't bad for tear out either. The final method if full spread adhesion. You fully glue the entire floor to the subfloor. This is generally the best type of installation, but it has major issues if you need to tear it out down the road. It's almost impossible to get off a wooden subfloor. You have to cut the subfloor out with it. For that reason alone we avoid full spread installs when possible. We've had to deal with tearing a lot of it out on insurance jobs and it's a total nightmare.
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Old 03-11-2014, 08:16 AM   #7
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


Have you considered a floating installation??
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Old 03-11-2014, 11:46 AM   #8
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


If you are going to do floating and glue the tongue and grooves, make sure you leave a gap all around the edge of everything. The floor will expand and contract as one large piece. If you are somewhere that has winter, once the furnace kicks in and the wood drys out, if it binds up against anything, a seam will open up to compensate for the shrinkage.
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Old 03-11-2014, 11:52 AM   #9
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


Regardless of how you install, you need to leave the expansion gap. Also, don't fool yourself, you get real water on the floor for a period of time, it will be trashed. "Real" hardwood that's laid, sanded then sealed has all the seams "filled" which helps with resistance. Engineered's seams are not sealed and the seam is as resistant as to how tight the seams are mechanically pushed together. Hope this isn't a Lumber Liquidators product. Also any reason you aren't installing yourself? It's pretty easy to do. Granted I don't know what the contractor is charging you, but I wouldn't pay more that a buck fifty a foot for a simple engineered install. (Now I'm not saying this is what an installer deserves, in my OPINION with how easy it is to install, I personally don't think it's worth more than that to ME. This is not a comment on what I feel a true professional should charge. Obviously if a homeowner isn't handy and has no tools then $4 sq might still be a savings).

I've never understood the attraction of wood in potential wet areas.

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Old 03-11-2014, 12:25 PM   #10
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


We got the solid 9/16" bamboo floors, and supposedly bamboo is more resistant to water, and being it's not an engineered layered product, maybe water doesn't get between the layers? I'm not sure..
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Old 03-11-2014, 12:25 PM   #11
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


Yes, we already know all about the expansion gap as we have installed flooring ourselves in the past. We are not installing it ourselves because we are much too busy with work and other things, so we have hired a contractor to install it for us. Also, my husband just had rotator cuff surgery, so he is not able to do anything like that right now. I am not looking for opinions on what flooring is best for a kitchen, so please don't post comments telling us that we made a bad decision. That is not why I posted on here. We have already made our decision and our flooring purchase. I'm sorry to those who have had not so great experiences with hardwood flooring in a kitchen; however, we have always had wood flooring in our kitchen, both in this house and our previous house, with no issues or problems whatsoever. We have purchased a very good quality Bruce engineered hardwood floor and we are very happy with it. It came very highly recommended for kitchens and even bathrooms because of its moisture resistance. Neither my husband or I like the look of tile. I only came on here to ask opinions on stapling versus gluing. Thank you to those who have answered my question. We have decided to go with staples.
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Old 03-11-2014, 01:41 PM   #12
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


I also have an engineered hardwood floor installed in my kitchen. I installed it myself and have had it since 2010. There have been a few minor spills but as long as they are wiped up right away there isn't any problem. Now, if the water supply line to the dishwasher happened to burst in the middle of the night then that might be a problem.
Hasn't happened in 33 years so I don't expect it to anytime soon. Also, I purchased my kitchen floor thru Lumber Liquidators and don't understand the negative comments about them. As long as you inspect the material when it's delivered then you shouldn't have any issues. I had a good experience and would buy from them again.
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Old 03-11-2014, 01:44 PM   #13
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


Glad you made your decision.
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Old 03-15-2014, 03:18 AM   #14
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Glue or staple installation for engineered wood floor?


This is usually the best type of set up, but it has important issues if you need to divided it out later on. It's almost challenging to get off a timber created subflooring. You have to cut the subflooring out with it. Because of this alone we avoid finish spread places up when possible. We've had to deal with pulling a lot of it out on insurance policy plan projects and it's a finish frustration.

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