DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Flooring (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/)
-   -   Gaps at baseboards after carpet install (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/gaps-baseboards-after-carpet-install-2182/)

cometbus 04-03-2006 08:08 PM

Gaps at baseboards after carpet install
 
Hello, just did a full condo remodel, all came out pretty nice, I am having troubles with the aesthetics of my carpet install.

Perhaps I should not have listened to the contractor, but they decided to install the baseboards about 3/4" off the floor, they used a scrap of baseboard as the guide. It turns out, this is perhaps a little hight for the carpet we got.

The carpet place used a 8lb pad, the carpet is Mohawk and I am not sure the style. I just want to get my facts correct for when they come back out to try to work on it and fix it. I was told by another carpet installer that in these cases, they simply put padding under the baseboard, so when they tuck the carpet in under it, it has some substance under the carpet to push it into the baseboard. My carpet plus padding is over 3/4" so it can fit tight, it is just that there is no padding beyond the tack strip to keep it up.

Options at this point are:
add another baseboard onto of the old one, towards the bottom, perhaps a small strip, to cover this up, this means re-painting carefully and is not entirely what I am into.

Pull the baseboards, get taller ones to cover up the mess I will no doubt make, prime and paint all over, again, last resort.

Pull the carpets back a little, cram some pad under the baseboard, put the carpet back in. I had them do this in one room, as I came home and saw the gaps, this seems to work and look fine. I am told by the carpet company they never do this, and they are pretty unhappy about my request.

I guess I could also trim in strips of new baseboard to bring them down closer to the floor, then have the carpet place come in and fix that edge as well.

Right now, I am looking for the best recommendation to make it look ok, maybe later, when we get new carpets, we can afford much thicker ones, and this wont be an issue, or I can strip in some baseboard material and caulk and paint it into place.

Final question, we have an area where carpet meets a radius of about 9 feet on the kitchen tile. I am not happy with this edge at all, seems when we vacuum over it, over time, it is just asking for wear and damage to the carpet. it is just tack strip and put down. Is there some sort of wrap the carpet under a strip method than can be done here? What are your suggestions for when carpet edges meet tile? The tile and carpet are both on cement floor in this particular case.

thanks

Floorwizard 04-03-2006 08:44 PM

Quote:

add another baseboard onto of the old one, towards the bottom, perhaps a small strip, to cover this up, this means re-painting carefully and is not entirely what I am into.

Doesn't sound practical.

Quote:

Pull the carpets back a little, cram some pad under the baseboard, put the carpet back in. I had them do this in one room, as I came home and saw the gaps, this seems to work and look fine. I am told by the carpet company they never do this, and they are pretty unhappy about my request.
Hmm, interesting. Never did that before.

I personaly would take baseboards off and then lower them. I would want to make sure there is still room for some cables I would like to tuck.
I would make the contractor do it or pay for it.
Not one time I can think where 3/4 is acceptable for a heighth. They need to take responsibility for that goof.

Quote:

Final question, we have an area where carpet meets a radius of about 9 feet on the kitchen tile. I am not happy with this edge at all, seems when we vacuum over it, over time, it is just asking for wear and damage to the carpet. it is just tack strip and put down. Is there some sort of wrap the carpet under a strip method than can be done here? What are your suggestions for when carpet edges meet tile? The tile and carpet are both on cement floor in this particular case.
There is a product called z-bar which a cpt installer can turn and tuck to the tile instead of the raw edge.
it doesn't take much talent.
A rubber t cap would be lame looking IMO but would solve the problem.

cometbus 04-04-2006 02:43 PM

I am almost willing to pull the baseboards and lower them, this means pulling the left and right door casings as well, and putting in some new ones, as they need to be longer. Its not a lot of baseboard, but not a little either, it would take me a few weekends to do it all.

My issue is that they are all caulked in place on the top edge. I am concerned that lowering them you would see the old caulk line. I really dont want to buy all new baseboards, plus, I am not sure they make them just 3/4" taller. We have 6" ones now, anything too much taller would probably be more than the look we want.

Getting the contractor to deal with this is more than likely not going to happen, I am ok with that, I would rather fix it myself and do it right, just looking for suggestions on the best method.

Right now, I am thinking either shove the padding in the gap under the garpet, or shim in a 3/4" strip, putty and repaint.

One final question, can the Z-bar be done on a curve?

Floorwizard 04-04-2006 03:13 PM

z bar cannot curve that I know of.

yea, if you lower the base, it will create a mess.

if you shove in pad, I guess that would work.

Bonus 04-05-2006 01:22 AM

I'd go with the addition of a thin strip at the bottom to cover the gap. You could even cut something with a nice profile to it if you like. A lot of the older homes around here have 6" base with 3/4" quarter round on the floor. I prefer a thin (1/4") x 1" or so strip rounded over at the top. I actually like the way this looks and have done it on purpose (really!) in my own home. You can paint these elsewhere and then use a brad nailer to install. Rub the nails with a putty pencil and you're done.

cometbus 04-05-2006 01:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonus
I'd go with the addition of a thin strip at the bottom to cover the gap. You could even cut something with a nice profile to it if you like. A lot of the older homes around here have 6" base with 3/4" quarter round on the floor. I prefer a thin (1/4") x 1" or so strip rounded over at the top. I actually like the way this looks and have done it on purpose (really!) in my own home. You can paint these elsewhere and then use a brad nailer to install. Rub the nails with a putty pencil and you're done.

Bonus, you just "nailed" it, I was thinking about this today, and found via search something called "shoe molding" which is pretty much what I think you are talking about. I can only find examples of this put on wood and tile floors, never on carpet, but I agree, I think it adds a level of depth to the baseboard that is not normally there.

I am wondering how you transition this to the door casings, I am guessing you just miter a small piece and call it a day?

When you say thin 1/4 by 1 does that mean the strip is 1" tall and a 1/4" thick? Seems awfully thin to me, worried it may not be strong enough, remember, my baseboards are up pretty high, not sure there would be much to nail to at that point.

Bonus 04-06-2006 01:03 AM

"When you say thin 1/4 by 1 does that mean the strip is 1" tall and a 1/4" thick? Seems awfully thin to me, worried it may not be strong enough, remember, my baseboards are up pretty high, not sure there would be much to nail to at that point."

How about you first nail a backer in there. I love brad nailers.:)

If you're rounding over the top try rounding over the end too where it meets the casing, looks pretty sharp.

flooring dude 09-30-2007 07:49 PM

For future reference 1/2" base height is plenty. Another thing to check is the "gully" the space between the tackstrip and baseboard. It should be no more than 3/8". If it is then I would call the installer and dispute this issue.
Consult the Carpet and Rug Institute.

AtlanticWBConst. 09-30-2007 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by flooring dude (Post 65618)
For future reference 1/2" base height is plenty. Another thing to check is the "gully" the space between the tackstrip and baseboard. It should be no more than 3/8". If it is then I would call the installer and dispute this issue.
Consult the Carpet and Rug Institute.

Just so you know: You're responding to a post that was last active one and a half years ago.

OLD POST ALERT!!

flooring dude 10-01-2007 07:48 PM

OOPS... I didn't even look at the date. Thanks, Mike


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:05 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved