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Leoskee 08-25-2008 01:55 PM

Flooring for basement with water issues
 
My basement walls have leaked a few times during heavy rains on two walls. One of the walls leaks because I did not pitch the grade away from the house. I'll be taking care of that soon. The other simply has cracks that allow water to come in. In both cases it is nothing major. But there is enough water on the floor for it to be visible.

I want to redo the basement and was wondering if using the premade flooring with the gaps underneath would be a good idea for my situation. I dont remember the name of the 2x2 pieces of flooring.

Im only going to cover 3/4 of the floor being that that is how the building design states it was done previously. I would leave the laundry and boiler area behind a wall but without any flooring.

Any ideas.

Thanks.

Bud Cline 08-25-2008 06:12 PM

Quote:

...premade flooring with the gaps underneath...
Good if you want to breed mold and mildew.:)

Leoskee 08-25-2008 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline (Post 151704)
Good if you want to breed mold and mildew.:)

Why dont you give me a suggestion then?:thumbsup:

I was told that the spaces in between allow movement of air. Im not dealing with flooding in my basement. Im dealing with an occassional trickle in some spots that simply wet the cement. The water that comes in does not pool or collect anywhere.

poppameth 08-26-2008 05:51 AM

Cushioned back sheet goods, i.e. Fiberfloor. The stuff is virtually impervious to water. Soak it too badly and you just hang it out to dry and put it back in.

Bud Cline 08-26-2008 01:13 PM

Quote:

I want to redo the basement and was wondering if using the premade flooring with the gaps underneath would be a good idea
Does this product have a name?:)

Nestor_Kelebay 08-26-2008 02:10 PM

Leoskee:

I would seriously consider glueing a 100% Olefin carpet down on your basement floor.

A 100% Olefin carpet means that not only the pile of the carpet is made of polypropylene, but the backing is also made of polypropylene.

Polypropylene is the most water resistant fiber that carpeting is made of, and polypropylene can only be solution dyed. That means that the carpet gets it's colours from tiny solid particles called "pigments" that are added to the molten polypropylene before it is drawn into a fiber. Thus, those particles are all encased in polypropylene plastic, and you can use harsh cleaning chemicals, like bleach, acid and acetone, on such a carpet without concern that you'll affect the colour of the carpet.

So, if I were you, I'd consider getting a light coloured 100% Olefin carpet so that you could better see any discolouration caused by mold or mildew growing in the carpet. If you ever suspect that is occuring, you can rent a carpet shampoo'er and put a 10% bleach solution in the solution tank and shampoo your carpet with bleach. (Then do a pass with just clean tap water in the solution tank to recover the bleach solution).

Doing that will kill any mold or mildew that does grow in your carpet without harming or removing your carpet.

You can also do the same thing with solution dyed nylon carpets. Just this past weekend I "torture tested" a piece of the same solution dyed nylon carpet I installed in a suite with a very concentrated solution of orange Kool-Aid, waited for the stain to dry and then removed it with bleach. As it stands now, I can only tell which corner of that carpet was stained with bleach because that corner is still wet. When that corner dries, I fully expect that all four corners will look identical.

Polypropylene carpets cost a lot less, but they matt down and ugly out faster than any other carpet fiber. Nylon is the longest wearing fiber, but it also is the most expensive fiber (besides real wool) that carpeting is made of, and solution dyed nylon carpets are still only available in level loop commercial carpets.

PS: You don't need to read the rest of this post, but I have a nice white Easter bunny here, and I'm going to torture him with an electric cattle prod until you do.

The word "Olefin" in chemistry simply means anything with a double carbon bond (C=C). The only fibers you find those in are polypropylene carpet. Polypropylene had a lousy name in carpetting because it was previously used to make only cheap "Indoor/Outdoor" carpet, or the "fake grass" you typically found around swimming pools and on miniature golf courses. So, when carpet manufacturers wanted to use polypropylene as a serious carpet fiber, they called the carpets they made out of polypropylene "Olefin" instead so that people wouldn't know they were made of the same plastic that the "fake grass" carpets were made of.

Leoskee 08-26-2008 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline (Post 151996)
Does this product have a name?:)

Dricore: http://www.dricore.com/en/eIndex.aspx

Is it any good? Has anyone used it before?

Termite 08-26-2008 07:10 PM

I'm familiar with DriCore. But first.........

You need to remedy the water problem before you ever think of finishing the basement. That probably means having the cracks injected with epoxy to prevent water intrusion. A sump pit/pump would be a good idea if you don't already have one, and of course the grade needs to be corrected.

Crack injection can be a DIY process, but most people leave it to the pros. Simpson makes a few different epoxies for injection into cracks.
www.strongtie.com

Back to flooring...
Dricore is slightly elevated above the concrete floor, but certainly isn't for an application where you actually get water on the floor. All concrete transmits moisture and the dricore has just enough of an airspace to keep it from wicking into the OSB. That doesn't mean that it can't mold under there. In your situation, actual standing water or wetness on the slab will mold just like Bud Cline said.

Look at Dricore this way. It is great for installation of wood flooring over a concrete floor, and it has some benefits. Covering up a water intrusion problem isn't one of them.

For the record, I wouldn't advocate installing flooring or carpet of any kind or composition in this basement until you can get the water whipped.

Bud Cline 08-26-2008 08:36 PM

Quote:

FROM THEIR WEBPAGE: "DRIcore is the essential air gap subfloor system with a moisture barrier to insulate your family from cold, hard, damp, concrete floors. The secret to the comfort of DRIcore is the creation of a permanent air space which keep concrete floors dry, warm and comfortable."
That just simply isn't true. Rising moisture is very common in basements and rising moisture MUST have a means to dissapate/evaporate.

Quote:

FROM THEIR WEBPAGE: "Let DRIcore’s simple and easy to install subfloor system take the chill out of your basement floor and the worry out of your next home renovation project. Give your family the comfortable and cozy basement they have always wanted."
Now there...that is true.

If occaisional inbound water and moisture is the issue, DRIcore is not the answer.:)

Leoskee 08-26-2008 08:42 PM

Im going to use a new term for my problem. Instead of flooding I have gotten dampness on the concrete. Also, for what its worth, Ive only had water on the basement floor 3 times in the 2 1/2 years I have lived in the house. Once was due to a heavy, heavy rains that lasted 3 days and the other two times happened when I added 1200 lbs of new soil on the side of the house that I did not pitch (didnt know I needed to at the time lol). I still have not fixed the soil issue. Plan on doing it once the weather gets cooler.

With this new information...what do you guys still suggest?

Bud Cline 08-26-2008 09:08 PM

Did you come here to talk yourself into doing this?:yes:

IF, there is a history of water migration in that basement, all of the above still applies.:yes: Doesn't matter how many words you redefine.:no:

If you are sold on the DRIcore then by all means GO FOR IT!:yes: Next you'll be back wanting to know how to remove the mold and mildew.:yes:

Termite 08-26-2008 10:01 PM

Bud's pretty direct, isn't he! :laughing:

But, he couldn't be more correct if he tried. You're getting very sound advice from us on this, and you need to re-read it and give this some real consideration.

If that floor is ever anything but BONE DRY, you're making a mistake by installing anything over it.

Leoskee 08-27-2008 05:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline (Post 152130)
Did you come here to talk yourself into doing this?:yes:

IF, there is a history of water migration in that basement, all of the above still applies.:yes: Doesn't matter how many words you redefine.:no:

If you are sold on the DRIcore then by all means GO FOR IT!:yes: Next you'll be back wanting to know how to remove the mold and mildew.:yes:


Im sorry, am I bothering you with my questions? I thought that was the purpose of this forum. To ask questions about DIY projects and get ideas/opinions/feedback from others. If I were in the industry of building and repairing homes I would not be here.

If you dont have anything to say that can help educate me on the matter at hand without side comments then dont reply to my post. Your sarcastic remarks are not appreciated. Filling up your reply with smiley faces doesnt mean anything if your intent is to insult people.

Leoskee 08-27-2008 05:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 152145)
Bud's pretty direct, isn't he! :laughing:

But, he couldn't be more correct if he tried. You're getting very sound advice from us on this, and you need to re-read it and give this some real consideration.

If that floor is ever anything but BONE DRY, you're making a mistake by installing anything over it.


Yes, and I appreciate it. Im not an expert here. I am learning day by day as to what my options are. Im researching on the internet and also getting good feedback from some of you.

The problem I have is that I am not sure if my problem is as bad as I am making it out to be. I have spoken to some of my neighbors and they all have had small amounts of water come into their basements. All of them have finished basements and have not had any problems with mold.

On the contrary, I have a friend that lives in another town who has water pouring in from cracks and holes in his basement walls. He has a sump pump that works overtime.

yesitsconcrete 08-27-2008 07:04 AM

your house so do whatever you want,,, personally, i wouldn't attach anything to the floors - ANYTHING !!! i'd acid-stain 'em & use throw rugs.

here's why - the water problem's NOT going to heal,,, eventually you'll have trouble,,, did this work professionally for 10 yrs,,, think my coyones're bigger'n yours.

your neighbors're not responsible for your family's health - if i had to guess, you've got cmu walls, not conc.


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