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-   -   Floating hardwood transitions to carpet and tile (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/floating-hardwood-transitions-carpet-tile-164286/)

adefields 11-21-2012 11:38 AM

Floating hardwood transitions to carpet and tile
 
I just installed a floating clic-lock bamboo hardwood floor in my dining room, kitchen and a hallway. The hallway and the dining room both butt up to carpet (having new carpet installed soon). I bought carpet reducer transition pieces and have already installed most of them, and while it looks nice enough, I really prefer a direct transition from wood to carpet (no transition to trip over). I'm thinking of removing the transitions, cutting back the planks and cutting a half plank and running it perpendicular to act as a transition and having the carpet installers roll up to the wood for a clean finish.

Questions:

1. Is there a danger of the finish splintering off of my new "transition piece" with the foot traffic constantly going over the cut edge of the hardwood? Should I just leave the store bought transition pieces on?

2. If I do cut, what should I use to cut? I'm assuming a circular saw set to depth, tape off the line to reduce splintering, and use a multi-tool to cut near the walls where the saw won't reach? Do multi-tools produce a nice clean line? I know they vibrate a lot in my hand when I'm cutting door jambs. Techniques for increasing my chances of cutting a clean line?

3. Also, the half bath has vinyl right now, but I may tile it someday. I have a flat surface reducer that when installed, will show under the door if you are in the bathroom with a closed door. However, I'm afraid to cut the wood flooring back because if I do and I eventually want to remove the reducer transition and tile up to hardwood, then the tile will show on the other side of the door. So I'm going to leave it as is but the question is, can I tile right up to a floating wood floor (or at least grout right up to it) and is there an impact to basically removing the expansion gap by doing this? Should I use something else in between the hardwood and tile, or am I forced into using a t-moulding since it is a floating floor?

Lots of questions. Thanks for any input.

joecaption 11-21-2012 12:04 PM

A floating floor needs room to expand and contract. That's why there's a dado on the underside of the strip.

Bud Cline 11-21-2012 12:39 PM

Quote:

2. If I do cut, what should I use to cut? I'm assuming a circular saw set to depth, tape off the line to reduce splintering, and use a multi-tool to cut near the walls where the saw won't reach? Do multi-tools produce a nice clean line? I know they vibrate a lot in my hand when I'm cutting door jambs. Techniques for increasing my chances of cutting a clean line?
There is some risk in what you are wanting to do but it should be do-able.

I would determine EXACTLY where the cut-line is going to be and then use a utility knife to deeply-score the wood at that line. Then use a circular saw and/or a multi-tool to make the cut. Any splintering that may try to occur will be mitigated by the score-cut and you should have a perfect clean appearance on the surface.

Typically changes in flooring products are made under the center of the door so that when the door is closed neither product shows on the opposite side. This way either flooring can be changed at any time without effecting the adjacent flooring product.

Unfortunately the "T" molding is the best way to go since floating floors must be allowed to move up and down as well as expansion and contraction accommodations laterally.


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