Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-10-2007, 11:24 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 9
Rewards Points: 10
Default

engineered wood floor


I am putting BR 1-11 6" engineered floor over about 700 sqf. in my house. The planks are 5/16 thick. Should I glue the wood to the concrete or use a pad under the wood?

I am looking for opinions of someone who has done this before. No one can tell me the best way to do it.

Thanks in advance

lost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2007, 01:04 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 1,861
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

engineered wood floor


I have someone did similar on my condo few years back... he did a great job and what we did is, putting underlayment pad then glue the planks and let the floor float as a whole... I don't like gluing on concrete because by any chance future removal is a nightmare and I don't really see a need for gluing it... assume you have a pretty level surface... one good reason of underlayment is it can hide minor (very minor) rough sufaces... whereas gluing... you may have a piece pop up and unable to lay it untill you fix the surface to perfection...


Last edited by KUIPORNG; 07-10-2007 at 01:06 PM.
KUIPORNG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2007, 01:19 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 220
Rewards Points: 150
Default

engineered wood floor


I did 450 square feet with acoustic dampening foam underlay in a floating installation. I'm not sure if all engineered floors can be done this way, but had asked the distributor before buying to ensure.

But I didn't put it direct on concrete, I put down dricore first.
slakker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2007, 10:07 PM   #4
remodeling pro
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,399
Rewards Points: 500
Default

engineered wood floor


Although I personally am not a fan of floating floors, it would be my choice here. I have seen way to many problems with wood glued directly to concrete, both engineered products and real wood, all installed by professional flooring companies. We will no longer provide glue down on concrete for customers. If they insist on it, we let them handle the flooring directly.
troubleseeker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2007, 04:23 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1
Rewards Points: 10
Default

engineered wood floor


What kind of problems have you seen with wood floors glued directly to concrete. I'm getting ready to glue some engineered wood to my concrete which is very flat, and there is no moisture problem.
Thanks for any input.
weekender62 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2007, 09:38 PM   #6
Member
 
Floorwizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Alaska!
Posts: 1,522
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

engineered wood floor


check the specs on gluedown install from the manufacturer, then do a moisture test.
there are many types of tests out there.

I also recommend floating over a moisture barrier.
Just cheap insurance.
Floorwizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2007, 01:10 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 220
Rewards Points: 150
Default

engineered wood floor


Quote:
Originally Posted by weekender62 View Post
What kind of problems have you seen with wood floors glued directly to concrete. I'm getting ready to glue some engineered wood to my concrete which is very flat, and there is no moisture problem.
Thanks for any input.
I'd double check the specs of the flooring product... concrete isn't waterproof and even if there's no visible water, it's still wicks moisture from the ground below. This moisture is usually enough to wreck some wood flooring, engineered or otherwise.
slakker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2007, 01:51 PM   #8
Member
 
Floorwizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Alaska!
Posts: 1,522
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

engineered wood floor


slakker is right.
Floorwizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2007, 07:55 PM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 28
Rewards Points: 25
Default

engineered wood floor


Quote:
Originally Posted by lost View Post
I am putting BR 1-11 6" engineered floor over about 700 sqf. in my house. The planks are 5/16 thick. Should I glue the wood to the concrete or use a pad under the wood?

I am looking for opinions of someone who has done this before. No one can tell me the best way to do it.

Thanks in advance

If the manufacturer allows either type of installation, then it is matter of preference. With floating floors the sound difference is the biggest issue, regardless of what underlay you use it still sounds different than glue down.
I do agree it is a nightmare to remove glue down.
flooring dude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2007, 04:45 PM   #10
Zoomingo
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

engineered wood floor


I would recommend floating the floor, if it is the type of engineered that allows it. Any time you glue a floor to concrete or nail to a subfloor, you risk the chance of the house shifting and creating "cracks" in the floor. With a hardwood that you can sand and finish, typically not a problem...all you have to do is sand it down, fill it in with a filler, stain and finish it. Not so with an engineered...once it's down (glued or nail) you will have to replace it to fix the cracks. You can buy fillers for this type of floor but I am not a big fan of filler on engineered floors. You typically can't sand and finish any prefinished flooring because of the amount of urethane.

My recommendation...if you can float it, float it.

Jason
Zoomingo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2007, 07:16 PM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 28
Rewards Points: 25
Default

engineered wood floor


Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoomingo View Post
I would recommend floating the floor, if it is the type of engineered that allows it. Any time you glue a floor to concrete or nail to a subfloor, you risk the chance of the house shifting and creating "cracks" in the floor. With a hardwood that you can sand and finish, typically not a problem...all you have to do is sand it down, fill it in with a filler, stain and finish it. Not so with an engineered...once it's down (glued or nail) you will have to replace it to fix the cracks. You can buy fillers for this type of floor but I am not a big fan of filler on engineered floors. You typically can't sand and finish any prefinished flooring because of the amount of urethane.

My recommendation...if you can float it, float it.

Jason
This is not true, with most engineered hardwood you can sand and refinish, or at the very least screen and urethane.
flooring dude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2007, 08:55 PM   #12
Zoomingo
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

engineered wood floor


True...you can sand and finish engineered but it needs to be done by a professional, not a diy. This type of floor, when sanding, can be easily nicked and cause more harm than good. On top of that, and definitely not that it would need it, but it shouldn't be sanded more than a couple times. With that said, if your a diy, I wouldn't recommend sanding an engineered on your own unless you really know what your doing.

Jason
Zoomingo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2007, 02:27 PM   #13
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9
Rewards Points: 10
Default

engineered wood floor


Putting the wood directly on the concrete will almost definately void the product's warranty. Also, excessive moisture will ruin wood floors, although the engineered will do better. Go with the moisture barrier - I agree on floating it as well.
ltcobretti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2007, 10:49 PM   #14
Member
 
Floorwizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Alaska!
Posts: 1,522
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

engineered wood floor


Sounds like floating it is the answer.

Quote:
you can sand and finish engineered but it needs to be done by a professional, not a diy. This type of floor, when sanding, can be easily nicked and cause more harm than good.
How come an engineered floor can be more easily damaged?

Quote:
I wouldn't recommend sanding an engineered on your own unless you really know what your doing.
It would probably be a good idea to also state that it is not recommended to sand a solid wood floor unless you know what you are doing as well.
I believe they are both equal in this area.

Floorwizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Installing Laminate Flooring over Wood Laminate Floor bantammom Flooring 7 05-27-2011 03:34 PM
Wood floor help/suggestions bigboyjoel Flooring 18 12-31-2008 12:02 PM
Wood floor or carpet? darsunt Flooring 9 08-03-2007 11:12 PM
Where to buy adhesive for engineered wood floor SoConfused! Flooring 2 12-04-2006 09:21 PM
Leveling wood floor helpless handyman Building & Construction 1 10-17-2006 10:06 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.