Electric Radiant Floor Mat - Flooring - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-11-2013, 09:08 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Charles Town, WV
Posts: 81
Rewards Points: 75
Send a message via AIM to Rich Send a message via Yahoo to Rich
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


Looking to install the electric floor mats to keep the tiles warm in the bathrooms. I have the subfloor open as we just replaced all the plumbing. What kind of insulation should be installed in the bays under the bathrooms? Checked at local home improvement store and it appears that the R-38 that they sell would fill the 12" cavities below the floor. Not sure should be using faced or unfaced and if faced should it go up or down? Any thoughts suggestions. These are 2nd floor bathrooms so conditioned space is on the floor below. The ceiling below is plaster and wood lath if it influences the decision. The subfloor is 1" T&G and I'll be adding 1/4" HardiBacker before the heat mat, thinset and tile.

Advertisement

Rich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2013, 09:31 PM   #2
DIY staff

 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 22,348
Rewards Points: 3,332
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


No vapor barrier is needed---both sides --ceiling below --and floor above are conditioned.

Do some research here or ask a few questions---you must not install the Hardibacker

directly on top of the old tongue and grove subfloor--that has to much seasonal movement----add a layer of 1/2" BC plywood first--then the Hardibacker.

Advertisement

__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to oh'mike For This Useful Post:
Rich (06-12-2013)
Old 06-11-2013, 09:49 PM   #3
Remodeling Contractor
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chicago Burbs
Posts: 68
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


Rich,
Like Mike said. If this is 1" TnG Pine? Yes add PLYWOOD first, then your Hardi.
I like to use SLU to encapsulate and protect the floor heat. MAke sure you use something to "dam" off the perimeter and door openings. I use Edge Strip Kits.
__________________
Phil,
http://www.edgestripkits.com
pgc555 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to pgc555 For This Useful Post:
oh'mike (06-12-2013), Rich (06-12-2013)
Old 06-12-2013, 07:17 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Charles Town, WV
Posts: 81
Rewards Points: 75
Send a message via AIM to Rich Send a message via Yahoo to Rich
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


What is SLU? Adding 1/2"ply before the hardi is going to make my finished floor height more than an inch higher than the adjacent rooms. Sounds like what I really should do is remove the remaining T&G instead of trying to get the old back in and start with a new sub completely? If so would 7/16 osb work or do I need to go with the 11/16? Should I use ply instead of osb? Thanks for the heads up on the shifting of the t&g wasn't even thinking of that being an issue.
Rich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 07:58 AM   #5
DIY staff

 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 22,348
Rewards Points: 3,332
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


Stick with BC plywood---I suggest you replace the old t&g with 3/4"---

Depending on the floor heat ---the heating coils can be attached directly to the ply---then encapsulated in self leveling compound.

The edge strips mentioned above are like peal and stick
'dams' that do two important things.
They help you determine and keep the liquid level and all the same depth.

They also keep the leveling compound from running under the walls and making a big mess.


Click on the link above----good product---I expect to be using that on an upcoming project---it will sure make the job easier.
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to oh'mike For This Useful Post:
Rich (06-12-2013)
Old 06-12-2013, 08:21 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Charles Town, WV
Posts: 81
Rewards Points: 75
Send a message via AIM to Rich Send a message via Yahoo to Rich
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


Didn't see the link but found the website with a quick search. Product looks awesome and not having to use Hardi would save me 1/4" on my final height. All and all doing it this way I think I'll only be the thinset and tile thickness above the adjacent room. Any specific recommendation for or against any of the floor mats? For the most part the prices seem similar as do the products in general.
Rich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 08:46 AM   #7
DIY staff

 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 22,348
Rewards Points: 3,332
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


I've used several types--and brands---
Give me a minute or two and I might be able to find the phone number of my supplier.

For small rooms I have used Nu-Heat---
For a larger job like the upcoming one I will use the loose coils so I can fit the odd shaped layout more easily.

Let me see if I can find the phone number.
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 09:09 AM   #8
Remodeling Contractor
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chicago Burbs
Posts: 68
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


I have installed almost ALL of them. They all will warm the tiles as expected. Only slight differences in them. Some have tape to help hold down, cable systems usually cost a little less and have the flexibility to conform to irregular shapes. All have programmable thermostats for efficiency. All have great warranties. Really it's up to you.LATICRETE may be the only one with a FULL warranty if you use LATICRETE installation products as well ( i.e. thin set , Self-leveler , grouts )
__________________
Phil,
http://www.edgestripkits.com
pgc555 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to pgc555 For This Useful Post:
oh'mike (06-12-2013)
Old 06-12-2013, 04:12 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Charles Town, WV
Posts: 81
Rewards Points: 75
Send a message via AIM to Rich Send a message via Yahoo to Rich
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


What about the reflective radiant insulation? would it make sense to add that as well on top of the batt insulation or even across the joists before putting down the new sub?
Rich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 05:39 PM   #10
Remodeling Contractor
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chicago Burbs
Posts: 68
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


I guess it wouldn't hurt? If the space below is heated already then you really won't have an extreme temp difference. Any extra insulation below the floor will allow most of the heat to rise - where you want it anyway.
__________________
Phil,
http://www.edgestripkits.com
pgc555 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 08:52 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Charles Town, WV
Posts: 81
Rewards Points: 75
Send a message via AIM to Rich Send a message via Yahoo to Rich
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


Would 5/8 CD work instead of 3/4 BC? joists range from about 12-22" on center across the space that I'm doing
Rich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 11:09 PM   #12
DIY staff

 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 22,348
Rewards Points: 3,332
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


If the span never exceeded 16" you could use 5/8 bc---but with the span going up to 22"--Stick with 3/4" BC---spend the extra--CDX has to many voids to be trusted for tile---the little extra expense is worth it.
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2013, 01:02 AM   #13
" Euro " electrician
 
frenchelectrican's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: WI & France { in France for now }
Posts: 5,369
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich View Post
Would 5/8 CD work instead of 3/4 BC? joists range from about 12-22" on center across the space that I'm doing
Stick with 3/4 inch BC plywood due the spanning spacing.

Make sure the oringal floor joist is good shape before you do anything more with it and double check to make sure you do not have bowed or arched joints if so that will be a good time to deal with it before you do any tile work.

Merci,
Marc
__________________
The answer will be based on NEC ( National Electrical code ) or CEC ( Cananda Electrical code ) or ECF ( Electrique Code France )
frenchelectrican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2013, 10:27 AM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Charles Town, WV
Posts: 81
Rewards Points: 75
Send a message via AIM to Rich Send a message via Yahoo to Rich
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


Going to stick with the 3/4". Been held up on this while the floors from adjacent space is being refinished. When I get back in there what would you guys recommend for cuttting the tongue & groove up as close as possible to wall, tub, etc? The multitool/oscillating saw would go closest I think but take pretty long. I looked at the dremel sawmax and similar from rotozip but they only cut up to 3/4" depth. Any thoughts or suggestions?
Rich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2013, 02:53 PM   #15
Remodeling Contractor
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chicago Burbs
Posts: 68
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Electric Radiant Floor mat


Rent a sawzall

Advertisement

__________________
Phil,
http://www.edgestripkits.com
pgc555 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Installing an electric radiant heating pad and tiling over a concrete slab floor of a breezeway Carolyn Gray Flooring 4 01-24-2012 04:32 PM
Installing radiant heating in a basement and general basement questions... CarlsonRower General DIY Discussions 6 12-09-2011 01:32 AM
electric radiant heat under marble forresth Flooring 3 10-13-2011 06:14 AM
Electric Radiant Baseboard and Built-in Bookshelves arobin HVAC 4 07-08-2009 06:42 PM
steam v. hot water, radiant sub-system Lor HVAC 1 06-11-2009 04:58 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts