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Old 09-28-2013, 01:51 PM   #1
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


Next step in putting our basement back together is the floor. We had planned on putting dricore down but when we ripped out the carpet we found the floor is sealed with those old tiles they glued down in the 60's. It is sealed quite well with these I believe. Also they probably contain asbestos so I don't really want to pull them up. Dricore is quite expensive so is it worthwhile to put it down? I know it would be a little added warmth for the feet ( we are putting a cork floor in) but could we just put down some kind of underlay and get the same result for a lot less cost?

On another thought...how much is dricore in the U.S.? It is on sale right now in Regina for $6 a board. It may be worth it to take a Minot run.


Last edited by Gloria02; 09-28-2013 at 01:56 PM.
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Old 09-28-2013, 02:10 PM   #2
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


It varies depending on where you are getting it from. I would roll something over the tiles, like Ugly DryLock first, before placing the Dri-core over it. The other would be if you have no problems with water intrusion, just lay down XPS, then Plywood, then the flooring. Room would be a whole lot warmer, and plus noise would be down.

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Old 09-28-2013, 02:55 PM   #3
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


My homedepot which would be consider a Chicago suburb (We don't have HD in my county)

DRIcore 7/8 in. x 2 ft. x 2 ft. Aspen Subfloor Panel $5.97 U.S. Dollar
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Old 09-28-2013, 06:35 PM   #4
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


Thanks guys, much appreciated. It sounds like if we did go with dricore we will just get it here. I like the idea of the xps and plywood though. We're not sure what ugly dricore is although it sounds interesting lol.
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Old 09-28-2013, 08:12 PM   #5
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


The dricore just allows for any moisture that may get under it, to be able to go to the floor drain, and air to move under it. Only good if you get any kind of moisture in the basement.
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Old 09-28-2013, 10:28 PM   #6
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


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The dricore just allows for any moisture that may get under it, to be able to go to the floor drain, and air to move under it.
What?

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Old 09-28-2013, 11:23 PM   #7
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


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Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
What?

Jaz
The whole reason for Dricore, was so that if any moisture was underneath the flooring, it could dry out, along with keeping the main flooring attached to it, from contacting any water or moisture.

I am not going to post a bunch of FAQ link-overs, so if you wish to read up on it, here http://www.dricore.com/en/faquest.aspx
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:56 AM   #8
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


With the floor tiles intact, on the full surface asphalt emulsion bond, you don't need DRIcore. The moisture is already stopped, no need to pressure-equalize the air space/slab. (Which does little to allow wick/diffuse water go to a floor drain- rather restricts it to the specific surface rising area- unless a flowing leak or major problem which should be fixed first anyway). The science of it, similar to Fig.3; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...ms?full_view=1

Delta-FL has the same info of "pressure equalizing" or slowing the moisture diffusion/wicking through a concrete slab, sealing the perimeter/posts/walls/drain edges hence keeping the moisture under the membrane- not in your basement air; http://www.cosella-dorken.com/bvf-ca...L_brochure.pdf DRIcore feels you should leave perimeters open; letting the room conditioning system deal with the extra moisture from the whole slab area.... hmm. Read the installation instructions to both.

Per your location, add insulation to the floor to counter Spring/summer warm air on your cold floor (40*F) due to basement lag time of season- even with DRIcore= R-1.7 (6*F warmer = 54*F); last page- http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...g-your-basment

http://www.epa.gov/athens/learn2mode...enrys_map.html

They make a big thing out of the low height required with Dricore (7/8") yet Delta is only 5/16" high. Add some foamboard= 1/2" (R-2.5 XPS) + 7/16" plywood (if needed- depends on finish flooring material) and the heights are about equal (+1/4") yet now Delta will give a heat flow reduction of 70% while DRIcore only 38% (nice to compare....lol).

I did the math; http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...,d.cGE&cad=rja

Other less expensive/better products are available (with accurate scientific facts); http://homerenovations.about.com/od/...floorTiles.htm

Gary
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Last edited by Gary in WA; 09-29-2013 at 11:57 AM. Reason: sp
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:58 AM   #9
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


Greg,

If the floor has so much moisture that it's in liquid form, nothing is gonna work for long. The idea of Dricore and other similar systems, is the create an air-space where "vapor" can equalize and evaporate, and to raise the finished flooring off the cold concrete.

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Old 09-29-2013, 12:19 PM   #10
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


Gary I think that the reason they want to use the DriCore, is due to that they do not know if the existing tiles have asbestos in them. That is why they are wanting to lay it down.

Jazman I am not going to argue about this, but I can agree as I have already stated twice, that DriCore was made with an air space in it. Why you want to create an argument about something that has already been stated in fact, is beyond me.
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Old 09-29-2013, 12:38 PM   #11
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


Laying foamboard then ply over the existing tiles/concrete is fine- tiles are not in the equation nor asbestos. It will not out-gas unless sanded or drilled, then inhaled. Fig. 15; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...lation-systems

Fig.3; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...059-slab-happy

Page 2; "heat loss from basements": http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...YQLG5n18RR0vdA

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Last edited by Gary in WA; 09-29-2013 at 01:03 PM.
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Old 09-29-2013, 12:56 PM   #12
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg
Jazman I am not going to argue about this, but I can agree as I have already stated twice, that DriCore was made with an air space in it. Why you want to create an argument about something that has already been stated in fact, is beyond me.
Not at all. I'm not disagreeing about the air gap, I mentioned it as the main reason to use it. I'm referring to you saying this;

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg
The dricore just allows for any moisture that may get under it, to be able to go to the floor drain,
I think that's a bit too optimistic. No one makes that claim, as far as I know. People shouldn't be encouraged to believe it's going to cure extreme dampness caused by leaks that result in enough water intrusion that it'll flow to the drains.

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Old 09-29-2013, 01:24 PM   #13
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


Gloria, here is a link from my area of the country showing percentages and importance of insulation on/under the slab; "When insulation extends over the full slab area, the heat loss rate is reduced by about 37% over the un-insulated slab and 20% over the perimeter-only strategies." From page 7, here; http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...D-inE9VfXGqoKA

Of course that is using a different thickness/R-value....
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Old 09-29-2013, 01:40 PM   #14
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


Jazman, no on is stating that DriCore is a remedy for properly fixing basements, but if you read the FAQ's, it states why they came up with the system that they did, for the product.

Yes, if you get a lot of water, Dricore is not there to stop the problem, but it is made to help keep the flooring off of direct contact of the concrete surface, and also allow for air movement underneath, to help keep a dry layer between the DriCore, and also helps with keeping the space warm. This is all per the manufacturer info.
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Old 09-29-2013, 01:42 PM   #15
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To dricore or not to dricore..that is the question


Here is the link I was thinking about; "Interest in basement heat loss is not only concerned with the problem of calculating the magnitude of heat loss but also with how it affects the comfort of the basement area. In a study by Besant et al. (1982) of 14 energy conservation homes in Saskatoon in which the basement walls were heavily insulated while the floors remained uninsulated, it was found that up to 50% of the total heat loss from the homes was lost through the uninsulated basement floor. More important, perhaps, was the finding that the basements of several of these homes were unsuitable as living space because of low floor temperatures." Page 2; http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...W2MrVA&cad=rja

Gary

PS. Greg, read my #8 again; the air pressure equalizes to keep the rising moisture at bay in the slab, restricting it's upward movement- hence a "sealed" membrane- DRIcore has it wrong; open around perimeters. There shouldn't be any "air movement" that would defeat the science of it all, IMO. Look at #2b, 3, and 4; http://www.cosella-dorken.com/bvf-ca...stall_inst.pdf

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Last edited by Gary in WA; 09-29-2013 at 01:49 PM.
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