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-   -   which direction do you run laminate? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/direction-do-you-run-laminate-17460/)

wheatiesb1 02-22-2008 08:58 AM

which direction do you run laminate?
 
Looking at the Armstrong Grand Illusions Cabrueva laminate. We will be doing a foyer, leading from our front door, down an 8 foot hallway into our country kitchen, which runs the back of our house and to the left of the foyer. We've been told to start at the "short wall" in the kitchen, furthest from the foyer, and run back towards the foyer area, so that you would be looking at the lengthwise (parallel) boards as you walk in the front door. However, we have also been told to run it opposite the floor joists, which would mean running it the opposite direction, seeing the boards perpendicularly (left to right) as you walk in the front door. Is there a PROPER way to do this or just eyeballing it for the right "look"?

AtlanticWBConst. 02-22-2008 09:00 AM

In hardwood flooring installations, the boards are run perpendicular to the floor joists for nailing purposes. Laminate is not hardwood, and is generally installed floating or glued to the substraight or subfloor.

The basic rule of "thumb" for wood-look laminate is: Board segments should be placed to be parallel towards the greatest natural light source.

tigerbalm2424 02-22-2008 09:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 100347)
The basic rule of "thumb" for wood-look laminate is: Board segments should be placed to be parallel towards the greatest natural light source.

I have heard this multiple times, does anyone have any reasoning for this?:huh:

darsunt 02-22-2008 12:45 PM

How about aligned parallel to the straightest wall? So the pieces are in proper alignment even if some of the walls are crooked?

AtlanticWBConst. 02-22-2008 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by darsunt (Post 100407)
How about aligned parallel to the straightest wall? So the pieces are in proper alignment even if some of the walls are crooked?

The exception would be if you have a longer rectangular area, or a hall-way. In those circumstances, you would want to run the segments lengthwise, parallel to the long walls.

AtlanticWBConst. 02-22-2008 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tigerbalm2424 (Post 100350)
I have heard this multiple times, does anyone have any reasoning for this?:huh:

Natural lighting does not illuminate the floor from above, like artificial lighting does.

Natural lighting comes in from the sides of a home (windows/doors). Because of that angle of lighting-illumination, the finish, design, and details of wood-like laminate flooring materials are more visible.

In this case, you have material with a picture of wood grain finish. You have lines where the segments are placed next to eachother. It is best to have these working, along with the natural light, in order to mimic the appearance of an actual hard-wood flooring.

adave 02-22-2008 01:42 PM

For an easier installation, I run the laminate perpendicular to the doors and closets. When I get to the row with a door jamb, the first piece I lay down is the piece that slides underneath the jamb. Once I'm satisfied with that piece, I continue in both directions.

Floorwizard 02-24-2008 06:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tigerbalm2424 (Post 100350)
I have heard this multiple times, does anyone have any reasoning for this?:huh:


When you run the wood or lam parallel with the light, then you only accent the short sides of the boards.
running the other direction highlights the longer sides and some do not like that look.

magicalflowers 05-05-2008 11:26 PM

Armstrong Grand Illusions WARNING/COMPLAINT/DISILLUSIONED
 
Before you buy, read my posting at:
http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load...5722924.html?5

I do not recommend Armstrong Grand Illusions.


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