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Old 03-20-2009, 05:00 PM   #16
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Congoleum Dura Ceramic


Quote:
the contractor that laid the floor down did a horrible job
That sucks

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So, let me ask you this, in your opinion what is the best floor you can put down in the kitchen?
Depends on the person living there.

best overall for moisture and durability and value? - Ceramic or Stone
Best for comfort and value - Cork
Best for affordability and moisture - Vinyl

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Old 03-22-2009, 12:27 AM   #17
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We had a floor installed about three months ago and so far it looks great. The installer used the subfloor sold by congoleum to be used with the tile. The subfloor was more like a thick paper. The installer said that there were problems with grout cracking when the tiles were installed over a plywood floor. The subfloor sold by Congoleum is a floating floor which allows the tiles to "give" without cracking the grout. We have two dogs and so far we love the floor. Hopefully we will feel the same way in 6 months
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Old 03-25-2009, 04:31 PM   #18
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I have been installing it since it's been out. Sounds like he has been useing too much water to sponge off existing grout. regrouting over the old is OK but if it has been down log enough to have grease and oil get into it I would advise to coat the grout with liquid latex first and let it dry completely before regrouting. Liquid latex looks like milk and dries clear with a little shine. Can be bought at Home Depot or Lowes as a grout additive for ceramic grout. We use it for coating ceramic floors that are non-pourus and when you patch over to make floor smooth for vinyl floors to be laid over ceramic tile.
I've been installing floors for over 40 years and one thing that can be done with Dura Ceramic is you can replace the bad tiles by heating them with a heat gun and replace the bad one with new one's and regrout if you have save the original grout or you will have to buy new grout. Also you can regrout bad grout lines. Grout gap should be 1/4" wide and sponged off with as little water as possible in one or two strokes and get grout out of sponge in clean bucket of water rinsed offten and keep bucket of water clean while doing.

Last edited by Floorman6; 03-25-2009 at 04:58 PM. Reason: seen a lot of people having problems
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Old 03-25-2009, 05:08 PM   #19
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Congoleum Dura Ceramic


I just had DC installed ina kitchen about 5 months ago. So far so good. It was layed down on concrete after leveling it. We had it grouted which looks pretty good.
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Old 04-04-2009, 07:18 PM   #20
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I installed my duraceramic floor and it turned out great. I really like the product.
Unfortunately I bought it from the wrong place. Most of the tiles they sent me had a chipped corner. They must have taken a beating because duraceramic is pretty strong stuff. The glue is awesome.

For a first time floor installer I thought it was really easy. Just make sure your underlayment is done properly and read all the instructions and watch the duraceramic install video.
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Old 04-04-2009, 09:19 PM   #21
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Rep at Congoleumn said to fix gauges or chips in tile is to go to a art supply or where they sell model airplane paint and match the color of the tile in the area of the chip and paint and let dry. I did this to some customers tile and worked fine. Tile is not that durable as you might think. grout also cracks but can be regrouted if needed as long as oil or grease doesn't stain if grout doesn't take try treating it first with liquid latex then regrout.
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Old 04-25-2010, 04:23 PM   #22
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I have the same problem with my light-colored grout that's now dirty white. What did you use to clean yours?
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Old 04-26-2010, 08:44 AM   #23
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Congoleum Dura Ceramic


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Originally Posted by Floorman6 View Post
Sounds like he has been useing too much water to sponge off existing grout.
Bang on Floorman6!

The only issue with DuraGrout is that as an Acrylic grout it does not like too much water. When grouting you don't want to get too far ahead of yourself either because it's much more difficult to clean off than traditional grouts.

If you get water under the grout it will bubble up and look less than stellar, make sure that if you're having work done by an installer that they have had experience with it and all should be well!

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Old 05-31-2010, 09:30 AM   #24
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I'm not in the construction business at all, but my wife & I put this product down in both our kitchen and main bath.

The most important issue in installing this floor is to make certain the underlayment is smooth, level and free of dirt and oils.

Using the contact cement adhesive, it's wise to premeasure and precut all pieces prior to installation. Once you put a tile in place, it's there. You won't get it back up without destroying the tile. We followed the instructions to the letter, but more curing time worked better for the tile adhesive. Instructions say 45 minutes, but we left it down for an hour prior to installing the tile. The thinner you put down the adhesive, the better (and more uniform) it dries.

In terms of the grout, I was very careful to work in small sections and make certain the grout was applied at 45 degree angles to the edges in order to work it into the grooves thorougly. While I did one or two tiles at a time, I had a 5 gal. bucket filled halfway with water and my cleaning sponge at hand at all times. Keeping the water clean helps prevent the "film" that can develop. The sponge wasn't wet, but it wasn't rung dry either. After the tile grout was cleaned off of the tile, I'd wet my finger and smooth the grout. Not one single pinhole!

We've dropped a number of different things on the tile and nothing has damaged it or the grout. To make the floor easier to clean, I would recommend applying enough grout to bring it close to the top of the tiles, as a recessed grout surface is harder to clean and maintain.

One last note: While this is a great flooring product, it's not recommended for use on walls - especially in bathrooms or where the environment is damp.

Hope this helps!
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Old 05-31-2010, 09:56 AM   #25
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Hey aspire,

Just wondering what contact cement you used to set the adhesive? Duraset 100 is Congoleum's adhesive but is not a contact cement.

From the Congoleum Installation guide:
Quote:
Use Congoleum DS100 DuraSet Adhesive, for all approved
floor and wall applications. Set tiles and planks into tacky dry
adhesive for floor applications and semi tacky dry adhesive
for wall applications.
Also, you state that it is not recommended for wall use. I would elaborate on that; it is not suitable for use on a wall in a shower/bath area. It is, however, recommended as a backsplash option by Congoleum.

From their brochure:

Quote:
DuraCeramic Options is a floor and wall tile with
embossed lines through the center of the tile in both directions.
Glad you ended up with a nice looking floor, I love DuraCeramic as an alternative to ceramic tile and have used it personally. We probably sell/install in the area of 500-1000 sft of Duraceramic / month which makes it our fourth most popular kitchen option, though it is catching up to some of the others!

Keep on truckin'
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Old 05-31-2010, 11:23 AM   #26
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I did use the Duraset adhesive. When it gets "tacky" it may as well be a contact cement because once the tile is placed, it is virtually impossible to remove it without damaging the tile.

When we did our bathroom (the smallest of the two projects) we premeasured and precut every single tile. That was a real payoff!

Once complete, we began following the to the letter, which was definitely the way to go. But, as in any job, don't get in a hurry and do the job right or don't do it at all!

You are correct in acceptable use for walls, but I would not use this in a shower or exterior setting.

All things considered, I'd have to give this product a 9.9 out of 10!
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Old 09-24-2010, 11:22 AM   #27
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I'm a (female) Structural Engineer and installed the product, Duraceramic, myself in my kitchen about 4 years ago. I have a decent sized kitchen, a husband and 2 boys. Before installing it, I did some research and comparisons. First of all, there are NO perfect products out there. However, you have to pick the product that suits your criteria and lifestyle. Color selection and installation is a key factor. I have 1- 1/4 inch subfloor because when the house was built, I thought I might install a ceramic tile floor in the future. I chose a beige earthtone color. Yes, it hides dirt and scratches. My husband won't take off his shoes (with taps no doubt) and he's hardddd on shoes and my floor. My walls are a 'cappachino?" color. The tiles butt joints so no grouting. I did that intentionally. Where the joints butt, I used a clear sealer as recommended by Congoleum. Currently, I have some scratches on my floor due to moving chairs as well as from the taps on my husband's shoes. I have a couple of dents from knives dropping.. Overall, the floor has held up well. My only concern is when I want to take it up.
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Old 09-24-2010, 11:26 AM   #28
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I didn't use it on my walls. I just chose a wall color that would compliment the color chosen for the Duraceramic floor.
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Old 01-27-2011, 02:00 PM   #29
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My duraceramic has been installed for 3 years, in a heavy foot traffic kitchen with kids and dogs. I have only on scratch, and no chips tiles despite many items dropped on the floor. Overall, I am happy with the floor, but what is driving me crazy is the grout. It was a light beige color, now it just looks grey and dingy, and I have tried everything to clean it with no success. Any suggestions would be appreciated. I am considering removing all the grout and starting over....
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Old 01-27-2011, 02:31 PM   #30
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I have this floor product. I have bone grout amd am noticing the same thing. So much for their claims of not having to seal the grout.

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