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Old 09-13-2009, 04:07 PM   #1
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Concrete basement floor patching


I have an old concrete basement floor where we have removed old linoleum tiles that were glued down with asphalt glue. Removing them also pulled up chunks of concrete surface, so now the foor is full of shallow, wide holes (kinda like divots). We will be carpeting the floor and the carpeting company will be leveling the floor before installation, but I need to glue some base plates for a short stud wall on a small area of this uneven surface with these shallow holes. The holes have a gritty, sandy surface and I've vaccuumed the loose stuff out, but I am afraid a new patch would simply loosen and shift around under the carpet. I also don't want to buy a 20 pound bag or 64 ounce quantity if I don't have to since I will only be using a small amount right now.
I remember being told to use self-leveling compund, but at Home Depot they only had Sika self-leveling sealant in a tube. They also told me to use Sika Concrete Bonding Adhesive to prep the holes and take care of the gritty, sandy situation.
What do you recommend?
Thanks.

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Old 09-13-2009, 05:25 PM   #2
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Concrete basement floor patching


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I remember being told to use self-leveling compund, but at Home Depot they only had Sika self-leveling sealant in a tube.
It's in the tile department. LevelQuick is the name.

Self levelling Compound isn't the product to do what you want to do tho.

Just use any Portland-based floor patching product. Or, do nothing. Use construction adhesive to set the plates and forget the divits.

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Old 09-13-2009, 05:55 PM   #3
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Concrete basement floor patching


Thanks, Bud!

In this case, the do nothing won't work because the holes are so frequent that some of the plates will have less than 20% of the original floor surface to adhere to. Just by the way, the stud "walls" will only be about 36" and 48" high to create a boxed in space for the dehumidfier and with wood "countertops" and will not go all the way to the ceiling which would provide that additional stability. They will be connected to the wall, though, so they should still be firm, I just can't risk any amount of the plates "rocking" on 20-50% of original flooring.

On the other hand, how good is construction adhesive at holding onto the gritty, sandy interior of concrete? most of these holes are less than 1/4" deep, but some spots (5% of the area) are up to 3/4".

Do you have some names of the Portland-based floor patching product? Do they come in small amounts or am I looking at buying a sack of it? Plus, will that hold onto the gritty stuff or should I prep with some kind of bonding agent? And will they feather out smooth with the surrounding surfaces?
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Old 09-13-2009, 06:53 PM   #4
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Concrete basement floor patching


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On the other hand, how good is construction adhesive at holding onto the gritty, sandy interior of concrete? most of these holes are less than 1/4" deep, but some spots (5% of the area) are up to 3/4".
Construction adhesive will bond nicely to the concrete, in fact the rougher it is the better. The adhesive will bridge the low spots. Use anchor bolts that will let you draw-down on the sole plates. Those plates won't be able to rock once the bolts are snug.

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Do you have some names of the Portland-based floor patching product?
Home Depot has a product from Custom Building Products but the name escapes me.

Mapei offers Plani-Patch and Henry's offers Uni Pro, all good products. There are many others. A primer should be used in all cases. Most of those products come in twenty-five pound bags but may also be available in ten pound boxes at a much higher cost of course. They all will feather.

The gritty surface is a good thing in all cases because it provides a greater bonding and locking surface for the patch to attach to.
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Old 09-16-2009, 08:15 PM   #5
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Concrete basement floor patching


OK, thanks!
I should be sure to make it clear that the gritty sandy surface is loose, gritty, sandy. I have used a vaccuum to get up all the loose stuff, but if I rub it with my finger with a good amount of pressure, or walk on the areas where the original surface has been removed and the interior material of the concrete is exposed, I can create new loose material. But, I suppose, as long as the adhesive or the primer (what primer do you recommend?) soak pretty deeply into the concrete and hold it together, I should be OK.
Thanks again.
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