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-   -   Can I pour concrete on my main floor of my house? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/can-i-pour-concrete-my-main-floor-my-house-104676/)

ufoman420 05-16-2011 03:39 PM

Can I pour concrete on my main floor of my house?
 
Hello,
This is what im wanting to do I have a 3 level home (basement,main,top) I am removing my entry way from the front door and my entry way to my garage and my kitchen flooring and pouring a top coat of cement so i can acid stain it. Is there any problems with doing this. I am looking to pour it the same thickness as my solid hardwood. so is that 5/8" i think. What should I lay down on the subfloor and what type of rebar system should i use? thank you.

rusty baker 05-16-2011 05:31 PM

I can't see a 5/8" concrete floor lasting very long. But good luck.

Bud Cline 05-16-2011 06:44 PM

Well you wouldn't use rebar.
And you also wouldn't want to just pour cement. It would never last.

The first thing you would do is to prepare the floor as if you were installing a stone or travertine tile.

Before you do that and get too far we need to know about your floor structure.

What size are the floor joists?
What is their spacing?
What is the unsupported span of the floor joists?
What is the species of the floor joists?
What are the floor joists covered with (sub floor material)?
How thick is the subfloor material?
How many layers are there?

There are pourable cement products made for this very purpose but there is more to it than just dumping some cement on the floor and staining it.:)

Be glad to help if you will provide the above information.:)

rusty baker 05-16-2011 06:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline (Post 649450)
Well you wouldn't use rebar.
And you also wouldn't want to just pour cement. It would never last.

The first thing you would do is to prepare the floor as if you were installing a stone or travertine tile.

Before you do that and get too far we need to know about your floor structure.

What size are the floor joists?
What is their spacing?
What is the unsupported span of the floor joists?
What is the species of the floor joists?
What are the floor joists covered with (sub floor material)?
How thick is the subfloor material?
How many layers are there?

There are pourable cement products made for this very purpose but there is more to it than just dumping some cement on the floor and staining it.:)

Be glad to help if you will provide the above information.:)

Bud, you forgot to ask home much homeowner's insurance he has.

ufoman420 05-16-2011 07:01 PM

The house is newer built in 2005. 1 layer of 3/4" plywood, joist are every 16" i think no cracking in the house it is a good built home. On the insurance part 200 sqft of concrete dispersed across the house is not going to cause and damage. I'm looking for help not negative info and I think so's, I want facts if it isn't do-able tell me and give me the reason why so I know not to do it. If you never try something you never know if its going to work.

rusty baker 05-16-2011 07:05 PM

That floor, as is, will have too much deflection for 5/8" concrete.

Daniel Holzman 05-16-2011 07:32 PM

Figure 150 lbs/cu ft for concrete, so a 1 inch slab is about 12 psf. You want 5/8 inch, so that is about 7 psf. Not much different than tile, so your floor may well be able to handle the extra weight.

As for rebar, no reason to use it, the concrete is so thin that you cannot get anywhere near the required cover to prevent rust through and damage, so you would skip it.

I have never seen a concrete floor over joists, not to say it would not work. I have seen plenty of tile floors, but they have very different properties than concrete. It would certainly be an interesting project.

ufoman420 05-16-2011 07:42 PM

Thank you for the info. I guess I didn't mean rebar but like a chicken wire or a light gauge metal for more strength

Bud Cline 05-16-2011 08:15 PM

Quote:

I'm looking for help not negative info and I think so's, I want facts if it isn't do-able tell me and give me the reason why so I know not to do it
Here we go again!!!!
I've done it!
I know how to do it!
It can be done!
I would be happy to assist you!

But if you aren't going to cooperate then I'm not going any further at this time. If you would be so kind as to answer the above questions we can get going with this.:)

ufoman420 05-16-2011 11:52 PM

Thank you for all your help.

rusty baker 05-17-2011 06:53 AM

Whether you respond here or not, you need the answers to all the questions Bud asked, and that is just the starting point. Good luck.

mustangmike3789 05-17-2011 07:16 AM

contact Surecrete Design Products. they have a system for stamped concrete overlays over wood floors. if your project can or can not be done, they can point you in the right direction.

matthewschrag 11-29-2011 06:10 PM

3/4" concrete over 2x10 supported subfloor??
 
1 Attachment(s)
I would like to pour 3/4 concrete or something like it on my first floor much like to original poster. The total square footage to cover would be about 150s.f. give or take. It is just the kitchen and a little offshoot underneath the wood stove. (I've attached a photo - the OSB, which is painted red in the photo, is what would be covered)

Bud Cline seems to know how to do it and I would like to know if I can, and how to do so.

Here are the answers to your questions that you posed to the original poster.

What size are the floor joists? 2x10
What is their spacing? 16 " O.C.
What is the unsupported span of the floor joists? 11' 2" with solid 2x10 blocking right in the middle of the span all the way across the floor if that matters
What is the species of the floor joists? I believe they are spruce but I am not 100% on that
What are the floor joists covered with (sub floor material)? Advantech OSB
How thick is the subfloor material? 3/4"
How many layers are there? just the 1 layer of 3/4" OSB

I have radiant heat hung underneath the subfloor if that alters anything.

Another added issue is that half of the floor is already hardwood. The concrete would butt right up to it. I assume the wood needs some sort of protection from the concrete? I was thinking of just a layer of plastic or something like it. I don't want a gap between the concrete and wood if that's possible.

I just finished the curved floor project today and wanted to start thinking about the kitchen. I was originally going to do tile, but cutting curved tile will be quite the pain plus the 1/2" backer board plus the tile and thin set put the tile almost 1/8" proud of the hardwood creating a transition issue I don't want (the hardwood is just a bit shy of 3/4").

Thanks for your assistance. Hopefully this can be done.

Matt

Bud Cline 11-29-2011 06:21 PM

Self Levelling Compounds are available for this purpose. The subfloor will be fine. The SLC requires a primer to seal the OSB and prevent the edges of the SLC from curling/lifting.

You wouldn't want to pour the SLC tight against the new wood floor. So, you could use a foam sill seal laid up on edge that will later be removed after the SLC has had time to set. This will leave a small 1/8" gap to accommodate expansion and that gap can then be caulked with a latex caulk to match the wood floor color.

After the SLC is in place acid staining can be done but this will require some serious masking of the new wood floor and lower walls and anything that can be splashed during the process.

I would suggest you visit the Mapei International website and research their Self Levelling Compounds used for a wear-surface. Regular SLC's won't work. Then take a look at the website of Gaye Goodman to do a little research on acid staining.

roblectric 11-29-2011 07:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by matthewschrag (Post 781572)
I would like to pour 3/4 concrete or something like it on my first floor much like to original poster. The total square footage to cover would be about 150s.f. give or take. It is just the kitchen and a little offshoot underneath the wood stove. (I've attached a photo - the OSB, which is painted red in the photo, is what would be covered)

Bud Cline seems to know how to do it and I would like to know if I can, and how to do so.

Here are the answers to your questions that you posed to the original poster.

What size are the floor joists? 2x10
What is their spacing? 16 " O.C.
What is the unsupported span of the floor joists? 11' 2" with solid 2x10 blocking right in the middle of the span all the way across the floor if that matters
What is the species of the floor joists? I believe they are spruce but I am not 100% on that
What are the floor joists covered with (sub floor material)? Advantech OSB
How thick is the subfloor material? 3/4"
How many layers are there? just the 1 layer of 3/4" OSB

I have radiant heat hung underneath the subfloor if that alters anything.

Another added issue is that half of the floor is already hardwood. The concrete would butt right up to it. I assume the wood needs some sort of protection from the concrete? I was thinking of just a layer of plastic or something like it. I don't want a gap between the concrete and wood if that's possible.

I just finished the curved floor project today and wanted to start thinking about the kitchen. I was originally going to do tile, but cutting curved tile will be quite the pain plus the 1/2" backer board plus the tile and thin set put the tile almost 1/8" proud of the hardwood creating a transition issue I don't want (the hardwood is just a bit shy of 3/4").

Thanks for your assistance. Hopefully this can be done.

Matt



How did you do the curved edge of your hardwood floor???


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