Bruce Lock & Fold Engineered Hardwood? - Flooring - Page 5 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-18-2009, 08:27 AM   #61
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chattanooga TN
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


About 4 months ago we removed the vinyl in our kitchen and had this product installed in our Kitchen and dinning area. We had been trying to sell our house and a lot of lookers were balking at the vinyl (it was in great shape, they just wanted a higher end looking floor). It looks great and didn't have any issues with cupping, noise etc. I did have someone else install it however .

It was put down as a true floater with no glue or nails.

FYI, we do feel it helped to sell the house.

Advertisement


Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 01-20-2009 at 07:22 PM. Reason: SITE RULES VIOLATION: Advertising Link Removed from Signature
owencarpet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2009, 07:46 AM   #62
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


I installed a Bruce locking floor in my dining room this past weekend. It looks really nice, but there are a few locations where it sinks a bit (maybe 1/8") when stepped on. It's a bit hard to notice it when you're walking on it, but it's easy to see it when someone else is walking on it. Like I said, I really like the way it looks, but this "sinking" makes it seem like fake wood (which I guess it is). From what I've read on here, others have had a similar experience, but I haven't seen any posts on a remedial solution. Does anyone have any ideas on how to address/fix this?
Just FYI, I did use the tap block on every third row (or so), and I also used the pull bar on almost every row.
handyeng is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2009, 04:19 PM   #63
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 211
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


First off its not fake wood. Its a floating engineered hardwood.

As for the sinking, its not the wood itself , sounds to me like its a dip in the floor below.

Did you check the grade of the old floor before you put in the new one? What did you use for underlayment?
mike costello is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2009, 05:48 PM   #64
Member
 
Floorwizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Alaska!
Posts: 1,522
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


I think maybe a tapping block on every row and a pull bar on the last row.
Not that it has anything to do with sinking.

Mike is right, it has nothing to do with your real wood floor.
Floorwizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2009, 09:18 AM   #65
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


Well, technically it is a hardwood VENEER. It's not a solid piece of wood, it comes in plies, or laminations, just like plywood. Additionally this "wood" has no ability to span any distance or do any real work like you might expect out of traditional hardwood flooring.

To get to the questions, yes, I checked the flatness of the floor, and it was installed over an existing parquet floor with the advanced 2N1 underlayment that is recommended. I was thinking that it's possible that the inherent lack of stiffness with this type of product makes it susceptible to warping and/or buckling that you wouldn't see with a traditional hardwood flooring.

When I was using the tap block I started out using it on every row, but noticed that when doing that it was opening up the joints - not the joints between rows, but the joints between boards in a single row. This makes sense when thinking about it - if you tap it at the end of a board it wants to rotate as a rigid body, so the other end rotates out and the joint opens slightly. I had better results tapping every third (or so) row because this minimizes that rigid body rotation.
handyeng is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2009, 10:52 AM   #66
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 211
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


Yes I know what it is, I have installed thousands of feet of the stuff with no issue. Technically is is a hardwood floor.

Another cause for the buckling could be you are pinched somewhere under a door casing or you may have an expansion joint that is not adequate to handle the expansion.

Laminated engineered flooring will nor warp on its own.
mike costello is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2009, 12:46 PM   #67
Member
 
Floorwizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Alaska!
Posts: 1,522
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


Quote:
Additionally this "wood" has no ability to span any distance
Absolutely it can expand. Just not as much as a solid. It is more stable than a solid, but it can still move....big time.

Quote:
I was thinking that it's possible that the inherent lack of stiffness with this type of product makes it susceptible to warping and/or buckling that you wouldn't see with a traditional hardwood flooring.
Not really. Like I said it's more stable. Your floor will have just a tad bit of "bounce" as it is a floating wood, but not super springy. Unless again...subfloor conditions are allowing it.
Unless you are suggesting the actuall wood is so soft your foot is caving in on it.

Sounds like more education is in the works to make sure you solve your problem. It seems as you are slightly uninformed and I am glad you are posting so we can help.
You have to understand the problem before you can fix it. And that's why we are here.
Floorwizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2009, 01:41 PM   #68
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


First of all, I said "SPAN", not "EXPAND" (EVERYTHING expands and contracts with temperature - and wood also does with humidity). That means that it has no strength in and of itself to function as a structural member - specifically that it can span over a small dip in the subfloor like a traditional hardwood floor can.

As for the inherent lack of stiffness I mentioned, it is absolutely true of this type of floor. Take a piece of laminate floor (say 36" long), hold one end in each hand and twist it. Now try the same thing with the same length of a traditional hardwood floor piece and you won't get nearly as much twist. This has nothing to do with the stability of the wood in the presence of water.

It's not bouncing, it's just not sitting right. It's not crushing under my foot, that would be an obvious (and egregious) failure.

As for education,
handyeng is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2009, 02:38 PM   #69
Member
 
Floorwizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Alaska!
Posts: 1,522
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


Quote:
Additionally this "wood" has no ability to span any distance or do any real work
Can you elaborate. It wont span or work? Huh?
Won't span ANY distance?
Look, sorry I am taking these words literally, it tends to happen on forums......

Quote:
there are a few locations where it sinks a bit (maybe 1/8") when stepped on.
Look, it's either subfloor or it is pinched. Your choice what you want to believe.
it may flex 1/8" or so normally because it's floating (I never actually measure the specs) But I do not see a big problem.
Floorwizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2009, 02:51 PM   #70
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


I can certainly elaborate. When I talk about the ability to span or do work I mean that if it didn't have the subfloor to support it and had to rely on it's own strength/stiffness to transfer load to the joists it would fail miserably. It would immediately snap as soon as you stand on it. I'm not saying that regular hardwood can do all the work necessary to span the joists, but it likely wouldn't collapse (deflection is a whole other issue). What I am referencing specifically is in a typical hardwood floor application if there is a low spot in which the hardwood loses contact with the subfloor it will have the ability to span that short distance across the low spot without having to sink down to touch the subfloor for support.

The problem I have with the sinking is that you can see it from a distance (mostly because of the way the light reflects off the floor) and it does look bad. It's hard to notice it when walking on it (seeing or feeling it), but easy to see from a distance.
handyeng is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2009, 03:17 PM   #71
Member
 
Floorwizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Alaska!
Posts: 1,522
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


I see thanks for the elaboration. That helps.

Quote:
When I talk about the ability to span or do work I mean that if it didn't have the subfloor to support it and had to rely on it's own strength/stiffness to transfer load to the joists it would fail miserably.
Yes that is correct. That is why there is a need for a subfloor.
It's kinda like my clients who say "look, this hammer damages my lam"
Well stop hitting it with a hammer!
But I see what you are saying. If the floor was installed incorrectly it will fail. period.

Quote:
What I am referencing specifically is in a typical hardwood floor application if there is a low spot in which the hardwood loses contact with the subfloor it will have the ability to span that short distance across the low spot without having to sink down to touch the subfloor for support.

The problem I have with the sinking is that you can see it from a distance (mostly because of the way the light reflects off the floor) and it does look bad.
Now I am totaly convinced there is a dip in the floor.
please help me understand.

You are saying if there is a big dip then lam will fail because it cannot span. I completely agree.
You are saying that your lam is dipping and you can see it from a distance....must be becuse it has curved permanently because of a dip in the floor right?

But I have a small problem. Lam WILL span the distance and you will not see it unless you step on it. But you said it is noticable when you look at it from a distance.
Your lam must somehow be permanantly bowed as stated earlier...I have never seen this. I would love pics.

Quote:
From what I've read on here, others have had a similar experience, but I haven't seen any posts on a remedial solution. Does anyone have any ideas on how to address/fix this?
Based on what I am hearing you need to repair the subfloor to repair the lam.
But I would disagree that solid wood will react perfect under these (I am assuming) extreme subfloor irregularities that exist.

unless I am completely confused....
Floorwizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2009, 09:41 AM   #72
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


I'm about a third of the way through installing the Bruce Lock and Fold product in a 350 sqft room and I think it's coming out quite nicely. A few observations that I have about the product:

1) While not as easy as Bruce's website makes it out to be, it's still pretty easy to install. Bruce's video clip makes it seem like you just plop the stuff on in and work at a fast clip. That's true if the boards you are working with don't have any warp whatsoever, but I've found that to be the case with only about 10-20% of the product. Most of the boards need a few good whacks with the tapping block to properly seat. All in all, though, still a pretty easy install. I'm moving pretty slowly, but I've never installed any type of wood/laminate flloring before.

2) I have noticed the "cupping" issue that seems to be associated with this product by lots of different web sources. However, I think it's pretty easily remedied. Usually, a couple of good whacks with the tapping block helps it seat properly and the cupping goes away. Also, before you install a board, check the tongue and groove for splinters. Those extra chunks of wood can prevent the boards from locking together properly and can cause cupping. Finally, I keep a few bricks on the leading edge to "hold it down" if there is still cupping. I put some scrap underlayment under the bricks so I don't damage the finish.

It's certainly not a perfect product, but I think it'll look fantastic when it's finished.

Last edited by CDeb; 03-16-2009 at 09:42 AM. Reason: typos
CDeb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2009, 09:59 PM   #73
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


I've read several people on this thread say that after installation, there was a poping, clicking or "rice krispy" sound when you walk on it. I just finished installing this product in my den and I am experiencing the same thing. It's driving me nuts.

It looks great, but the clicking sound is very noticable at times.

The floor seems to lay flat and I left plenty of expension so I don't understand why this is happening. Can anyone tell me if the sound will go away as the floor settles or is it something that I'll have to learn to live with?

My wife seems to think an area rug would solve the problem....but I don't want to hide the beautiful floor.

Thanks!!! Great forum.
jcifjr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2009, 12:19 PM   #74
Member
 
Floorwizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Alaska!
Posts: 1,522
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


Sounds like the old "tounges breaking" problem Pergo had with the Home Depot quality.

ouch
Floorwizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2009, 11:55 AM   #75
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Bruce Lock & Fold engineered hardwood?


OK, so now I've read read in quite a few places where this flooring tends to be noisy once installed. So don't feel like my situation is out of the ordinary.

What I'd like to know from anyone out there who has experienced this situation with this floor is.......does it get better with time?

If not, can anyone suggest a way to fix the problem? I used the recommended underlayment; the correct expansion spacing; my floor is sub floor is clean and level and I followed the installation instructions to a T.

Any advice would be great.

Advertisement

jcifjr is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
engineered hardwood installation; Floating or Glue? El Buey Flooring 4 08-17-2007 03:53 PM
Suggestions for engineered hardwood kleclerc Flooring 6 03-16-2007 11:31 AM
engineered hardwood wildeman Flooring 2 10-14-2006 01:24 AM
Flooring hardwood v engineered or laminate skits Flooring 1 07-12-2006 10:03 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts