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Old 05-17-2012, 10:27 PM   #1
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Bathroom subfloor


Hi all,

I'm hoping someone with a little more knowledge can point me in the right direction.

What I have is a bathroom where we want to have a drain in the middle of the room and a shower in the room as well with no stall/base. (Think like a gym locker room shower) I'm planning to get someone else to tile this as I'm not comfortable trying to put proper slopes in on the tiles.

I would like to put the sub floor in though but I'm unsure on how to go about it. Currently I have 3/4" exterior osb on the floor though if necessary I can remove it without to much problem. The floor joists are 8" centers (yes more then needed) and the room itself is 5.5' x 7.5'

Would it be ok to go about it this way
3/4" osb > 1/2" Ext Plywood > thinset mortar > 1/2" cement board > Tile

Or should something else be in there before the tile ? Or should something else be done completely different ?

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Old 05-18-2012, 10:06 PM   #2
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Bathroom subfloor


Quote:
Originally Posted by Noc View Post
Hi all,

I'm hoping someone with a little more knowledge can point me in the right direction.

What I have is a bathroom where we want to have a drain in the middle of the room and a shower in the room as well with no stall/base. (Think like a gym locker room shower) I'm planning to get someone else to tile this as I'm not comfortable trying to put proper slopes in on the tiles.

I would like to put the sub floor in though but I'm unsure on how to go about it. Currently I have 3/4" exterior osb on the floor though if necessary I can remove it without to much problem. The floor joists are 8" centers (yes more then needed) and the room itself is 5.5' x 7.5'

Would it be ok to go about it this way
3/4" osb > 1/2" Ext Plywood > thinset mortar > 1/2" cement board > Tile

Or should something else be in there before the tile ? Or should something else be done completely different ?
Quote:
Would it be ok to go about it this way
3/4" osb > 1/2" Ext Plywood > thinset mortar > 1/2" cement board > Tile
Absolutely NOT!.

Quote:
Or should something else be in there before the tile ? Or should something else be done completely different?
Yes, something different, this plan isn't close. Do some research then find a real tile setter to interview. Come back here to review their plans.

Jaz

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Old 05-20-2012, 04:12 AM   #3
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Absolutely NOT!.



Yes, something different, this plan isn't close. Do some research then find a real tile setter to interview. Come back here to review their plans.

Jaz
Telling me I'm wrong helps in no way whatsoever if you don;t offer any info besides that. You say do some research and part of that is coming here asking for advice/info.
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Old 05-20-2012, 06:33 AM   #4
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Bathroom subfloor


You need to waterproof the floor completely and also the bottom 6 to 8 inches of the wall---

I suggest you skip the cement board--water goes right through that product---and look at Schluter or Latacrete--Schluter makes waterproof surface membranes like Ditra and Kerdi (Jaz is an expert in these installs)

Latacrete also makes surface membranes and a paint on one called Hydroban.

If you want a handicap accessible curbless shower--look into linear drains---these are often placed across the shower entry and then the shower floor is sloped up starting from the drain --back to the back wall.

Bullet proof waterproofing is required---don't go with the low bidder on this job--failure will cost you a fortune---
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Old 05-20-2012, 09:40 AM   #5
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Bathroom subfloor


Quote:
Originally Posted by Noc
Hi all,

I'm hoping someone with a little more knowledge can point me in the right direction.

What I have is a bathroom where we want to have a drain in the middle of the room and a shower in the room as well with no stall/base. (Think like a gym locker room shower) I'm planning to get someone else to tile this as I'm not comfortable trying to put proper slopes in on the tiles.

I would like to put the sub floor in though but I'm unsure on how to go about it. Currently I have 3/4" exterior osb on the floor though if necessary I can remove it without to much problem. The floor joists are 8" centers (yes more then needed) and the room itself is 5.5' x 7.5'

Would it be ok to go about it this way
3/4" osb > 1/2" Ext Plywood > thinset mortar > 1/2" cement board > Tile

Or should something else be in there before the tile ? Or should something else be done completely different ?
The osb should not be in this install as its not a recommended plywood.
Cement board is also not recommended for a wetbed although it will prevent swelling if tile fails its not water proof but putting a liquids water proof on like a redgard will make it so, therefore is a option for you but not suggested for a wet bed and will still need a underlayment ply rated to replace the osb.

A water proof membrane over the rated ply which you can use advantech or Bc sanded ply will be the best method but like jaz said get a tile settler in there and pick his thoughts and come back here only because we are not there to see 1st hand.

Last edited by JetSwet; 05-20-2012 at 09:45 AM.
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Old 11-01-2012, 03:47 AM   #6
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Telling me I'm wrong helps in no way whatsoever if you don;t offer any info besides that. You say do some research and part of that is coming here asking for advice/info.
What did you do to solve your problem with the sloped floor?
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Old 11-02-2012, 12:38 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
Do some research...
One good place to start, in my humble opinion, would be with Schluter. They have a good system for bathroom installations like yours. They have published a lot of good information on their site that will help you not only prep the room for your desired end-state, but will help make you an educated tiling consumer.
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Old 11-03-2012, 03:40 AM   #8
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Bathroom subfloor


Without doing a physical walk through of your bathroom it's difficult to determine what is required to properly complete your installation. There really are a lot of variables to consider, and every home is different, with different building codes across the country, etc. Try and find 3 experienced, professional tile installers and have them come out and give you an estimate. Have them explain every step of the process that they would use, and why. Also, when I say "professional tile installer" I'm not referring to somebody's brother that once watched a guy install a garage entry over concrete... You need someone skilled, knowledgeable, and dependable for a project like this and anything less could end in disaster. There are a LOT of steps and small details along the way that can make or break this project and unfortunately there are a lot of "tile guys" that don't have the patience, skill, or knowledge to do this project properly, so choose carefully and good luck.

Oh yeah, will there be a vanity with a sink, and a toilet in this "shower" room? You'll need very good venting, and you will need to really think about a lot of other details.. such as: your vanity/sink, and toilet need to be level, which could be problematic when going over a properly sloped floor. Another thing to think about is how well a vanity will hold up when you're basically installing it in the edge of a shower. Also, since you aren't containing the "shower mess" (ie. dirt, soap scum, general filth) to a smaller area then keeping the whole room clean might turn out to be a real pain. Instead of just having to keep a shower clean now you've got a toilet in your shower, as well as a vanity, mirror, etc.

Just curious, but what do you hope to gain by doing this compared to having a custom shower installed only in part of the room? If you're wanting a curbless custom shower base there are much better ways of going about it than this and you won't have all of the potential problems or irritations. I'm not trying to talk you in or out of anything, just saying that you really need to examine the big picture, weigh the pros and cons, and make an educated decision.

If you end up getting some installation quotes feel free to post some of that info. I'm curious as to what someone who has done a walkthrough has to say about this.

Good luck with your project.
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Old 11-03-2012, 03:46 AM   #9
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Bathroom subfloor


Almost forgot.. I don't know about your neck of the woods, but here in the Kansas City area it is illegal to have any electrical outlets, toggle switches, etc. within arms reach of a wet area. If the building inspector confirms that this entire room would be classified as a shower then you'd have to relocate your light switch, fan switch, and GCFI outlet outside the bathroom door 3+ feet down the hallway. This would add a tremendous inconvenience for anyone using the shower room. Even if you decided not to pull a permit and test your luck you'd have a major problem if you ever decided to sell the house.

Just some food for thought.

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