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gahand6067 01-28-2008 09:57 AM

Basement flooring help
 
We just moved into a house with asbestos-laden tile in the basement. We are trying to decide what to do with the floor when we finish the basement. We don't want to do carpet because we have pets that have accidents. From reading other posts it sounds like ceramic tile would only be an option if we removed the vinyl tiles, which I don't really want to do. Could a laminate floor simply be placed over the existing tiles? I am not sure about a moisture in the basement, but if I went with a laminate what percautions could I take to prevent moisture from damaging the laminate. Any other options out there?

Bud Cline 01-28-2008 12:02 PM

What would be wrong with a floating ceramic tile floor?

Google Snapstone - it may be the answer to all your concerns and could be installed over the existing flooring.:thumbsup:

gahand6067 01-28-2008 02:07 PM

I guess I don't know anything about "floating" ceramic tile floors. Do you have any sites where I can get info about this process?

Bud Cline 01-28-2008 02:24 PM

You know what "Google" is?

Go to Google and search for "Snapstone".


OK here ya go.....

http://www.snapstone.com/

Mr. Michael 02-02-2008 11:22 PM

a lot of tile installers have sworn snapstone is the devil. i'd be willing to try it myself, but at $5 sf, awfully expensive for a product that has such mixed reviews.

Bud Cline 02-02-2008 11:53 PM

Quote:

a lot of tile installers have sworn snapstone is the devil.

Why come here and dump a turd if you aren't going to clean up your mess. If you have something specifically troubling about the product then be specific about the problems.

I'd like to hear about any issues you may have knowledge of - or are you just spreading negative rumors about a product you know nothing about?

If you consider the forgiveness in the substrate afforded by SnapStone...
If you consider the lack of need for a tile backer afforded by SnapStone...
If you consider the lack of a need for setting materials afforded by SnapStone...
If you consider the lack of a need to spread thinset and adjust tiles afforded by SnapStone...

THEN the 5 bucks is cheap, (if that's what it costs) Way too cheap for a full blown quality porcelain tile that is 9mm thick. Thicker than any 12" porcelain tile on the market.

gone_fishing 02-03-2008 09:12 AM

Hypothetically speaking I know someone that removed 100 sq ft of asbestos tile yesterday. Hypothetically this person used Ardex feather finish to encapsulate the mastic. Floor is ready to tile. Gave them peace of mind knowing there is not asbestos underneath. Took 2 hours start to finish.

TNRocks 02-03-2008 07:20 PM

My buddy installed this soaps###stone and after 6 months it started cracking on him. I checked it out and the floor was solid with the right underlayment and the installation was correctly done. So for the past year his kitchen is nothing but a cracking floor. Evertime u walk on it the tile cracks again. I told him to contact the manf. about their product to see if they would back it up. So far nothing. :jester: :jester: :jester:

Bud Cline 02-03-2008 07:29 PM

What is the criteria of the floors structure, what is its deflection rating? How did you determine the problem was with the product and not the substrate?:huh:

Who said anything about "soapstone?"

gahand6067 02-04-2008 02:40 PM

I looked into the Snapstone. They carry it at Menards for $6 a foot, and then the grout is $60 for a container that covers about $60 and that covers about 60 sq feet. I thought this looked like a logical solution for me, however I am finding a lot of people that are critical of this product. I am not sure how level my basement floor is so I am guessing this could be problematic for me. I lived in a house previously where the tile was not properly done and have had do deal with broken tiles so I do not want to deal with it again. Any suggestions?

Bud Cline 02-04-2008 06:34 PM

Your floor doesn't have to be "level" but it should be flat, the flatter the better of course. What's the problem with the floor?

Quote:

I thought this looked like a logical solution for me, however I am finding a lot of people that are critical of this product.

I wish if you guys are going to launch condemnation you'd be more specific. What's the problem with the product? Simply saying: "...a lot of people that are critical" don't get it and doesn't help anybody. If you really found "a lot of people" then you must know of the problems they are complaining about. What are they?

gahand6067 02-05-2008 07:54 AM

Asa far as probelms with the floor, there are some spots where tiles are missing. If it just has to be flat, I may be ok there.

My concerns about this product are 1) the price and 2) long term durability. Since it is a relatively new product, I wonder if it will hold up ok for the next 5, 10, or 20 years. I haven't seen or heard anyone that has installed it say any good or bad things about it a year or 2 later. Bud, have you seen it in action and know it hold up ok? I am wondering if I would be better off just going with carpet for half the price and if my cats and son destroy it I could replace it and still come out ahead.

AtlanticWBConst. 02-05-2008 08:29 AM

Another "cost-effective" option is seal the existing flooring, and installing a floating laminate material. There are manufacturers that make many forms of laminate, icluding some with a tile look.

Example. (This was in a rental apartment so the kitchen cabinets and molding were pretty beat up):

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c2...T/IMG_0964.jpg

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c2...T/IMG_0948.jpg

gahand6067 02-05-2008 08:54 AM

I would consider laminate, however I have read that laminate is a bad idea in basements. I would guess the sealant would prevent moisture from being a problem, correct? Unless I got a large amount of water...

Bud Cline 02-05-2008 10:56 AM

Quote:

My concerns about this product are 1) the price
That is your own personal issue and only you can deal with it. It ain't vinyl and it ain't carpet.

Quote:

and 2) long term durability.
Now see, this is where you lose me. You don't like the price but at the same time you want "long term durability". Long term durability is a relative issue. The durability of any product is dependant upon the manner in which the product is used and maintained. Especially in an under-grade application.

Quote:

Since it is a relatively new product, I wonder if it will hold up ok for the next 5, 10, or 20 years.
Who knows? You will willingly pay $25,000.00 for a new car that won't last you seven years but then you want to pay only a few hundred dollars for a product and you want it to last you twenty years?

Quote:

I haven't seen or heard anyone that has installed it say any good or bad things about it a year or 2 later.
That's not what you said in your earlier post! In your earlier post you said you were: "finding a lot of people that are critical of this product." Now which is it?

Quote:

Bud, have you seen it in action and know it hold up ok?
Yes I have seen it in action in a commercial application. It's a manufacturing/office environment and experiences daily heavy foot traffic. The product is holding up very well in that environment. You aren't suggesting that I warranty your installation are you?:)

Quote:

I am wondering if I would be better off just going with carpet for half the price and if my cats and son destroy it I could replace it and still come out ahead.
There again - your call - it was just an idea. Does any of this (below) sound familiar to you?

Quote:

We just moved into a house with asbestos-laden tile in the basement. We are trying to decide what to do with the floor when we finish the basement. We don't want to do carpet because we have pets that have accidents. From reading other posts it sounds like ceramic tile would only be an option if we removed the vinyl tiles, which I don't really want to do. Could a laminate floor simply be placed over the existing tiles? I am not sure about a moisture in the basement, but if I went with a laminate what precautions could I take to prevent moisture from damaging the laminate. Any other options out there?

Those were the words that opened this discussion and now you have done a total about-face. My suggestion has answered all of your concerns. Like I said...It was just an idea.:)


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