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Old 09-01-2013, 08:53 AM   #1
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Basement flooring


Hello
My basement is pretty healthy...no moisture (i have a sump pump)
How should i do to put a subfloor + flooring (laminate or other, don't know yet)?
My basement has 2 drains, with slope accordingly (which is a good thing by the way)
Is there a way to keep the slope and drain functionality, under some kind of framing for example?
Put a lot of SLC can be an option to get it flat, but then advantage of the slope+drain will be gone....!!!

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Old 09-01-2013, 01:56 PM   #2
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Basement flooring


Pick a flooring like Luxury Vinyl Tile like Adura, or Vinyl Composite Tile, like the standard Armstrong. The LVT vinyl wood look planks that snap together are perfect for basement floors. They'll conform to some of the curves of your drain without issues, and they'll resist the inevitable moisture that every basement WILL have and that you still have, even if you have a sump pump system. Concrete is porous, and it's like installing flooring onto a sponge. That's why VCT was so popular for years, and still remains popular. It will conform to the contours, and you can do some interesting patterns if you desire to.

LVT joining


VCT pattern

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Old 09-01-2013, 06:53 PM   #3
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If you install luxury vinyl planks of tile directly on the concrete and it gets wet (I'm assuming it will, which is why you have 2 floor drains), moisture will collect when the flow is interrupted by the vinyl's contact with the concrete. Where it collects, you may get mold.

Depending on the angle of the slope to these drains, the attachment mechanisms of some floating floors will become compromised or even break. And if they do flex enough to conform to the drain and slope, then you are blocking the flow of any moisture or water.

Since you have already surmised you may need a raised structure under the finished flooring, I suggest you look into DRIcore. Here's a video:

http://youtu.be/m46iqfr3Zrs

Jim

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Old 09-02-2013, 03:44 PM   #4
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Basement flooring


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Originally Posted by Jim McClain View Post
If you install luxury vinyl planks of tile directly on the concrete and it gets wet (I'm assuming it will, which is why you have 2 floor drains), moisture will collect when the flow is interrupted by the vinyl's contact with the concrete. Where it collects, you may get mold.

Depending on the angle of the slope to these drains, the attachment mechanisms of some floating floors will become compromised or even break. And if they do flex enough to conform to the drain and slope, then you are blocking the flow of any moisture or water.

Since you have already surmised you may need a raised structure under the finished flooring, I suggest you look into DRIcore. Here's a video:

http://youtu.be/m46iqfr3Zrs

Jim
OK, but if i do nothing first, the Dricore won't lay down on a flat surface!!!
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Old 09-02-2013, 04:59 PM   #5
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Basement flooring


It doesn't look like you watched the video. It addresses that at about the 2:30 mark.

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Old 09-02-2013, 05:31 PM   #6
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Basement flooring


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Originally Posted by Jim McClain View Post
It doesn't look like you watched the video. It addresses that at about the 2:30 mark.

Jim
Yes, I did watch the video.....about the shims
But my basement seems to have progressive slope toward the drains
Does that mean I may have to put shims at almost each panel's corner?
Well, it looks like feasible of course, but a little bit time consuming, don't you think?
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Old 09-02-2013, 05:53 PM   #7
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Basement flooring


I've never seen a floor that needed a shim under DRIcore every panel, but maybe your floor is different. You haven't provided enough information or pictures for me to know. Once the DRIcore is down, you can treat it much like any other subfloor. If it needs patching or felt to flatten a dip, then you can do that.

It's a great solution to your problem, but not the only solution. Your flooring is meant to last many, many years. If you don't want to put forth the effort to assure that, then you are free to look for the easier, softer way. Others before me have offered their advice. You can use theirs too, if you prefer. I only sold and installed flooring for 35 years and retired from that 6+ years ago. And I would never tell someone I have the only right answers - or that my answers are always right. I just help where I think I can.

Jim
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Old 09-02-2013, 06:44 PM   #8
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Basement flooring


I'm having VCT put down in my workshop space. It's relatively inexpensive and pretty easy to replace sections should anything get damaged. There are lots of options for it, and laying patterns is a great way to vary it a bit.

Me, I'm going with a medium blue color (commercial Congoleum 'Horizon', iirc). I want a color that'll do a reasonable job of hiding dirt but still have a little fancier look than just the typical generic white/gray flecked.
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Old 09-04-2013, 10:14 AM   #9
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Basement flooring


If you keep it waxed it should look decent for a good while.

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