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-   -   baseboard / tile / carpet questions (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/baseboard-tile-carpet-questions-152237/)

firstimereno 08-01-2012 02:56 PM

baseboard / tile / carpet questions
 
hello flooring people -

question 1: what is the best height for me to install my baseboards so that i have the perfect amt of 'tuck' for my upcoming carpet? not too tight, certainly not too loose/gap. im putting in a lowe's middle+ grade (1.74/sf) cut pile carpet and 8 lb pad.

question 2: what is the proper distance from the face of baseboard that the carpet guys should install the tack strip? (just so i make sure they do it right)

this is a 1988 1-level on 3' crawlspace with cinderblock piers, 2x10 joists 16" oc. 7/16 (or 1/2, hard to tell) lower layer plywood, 5/8 upper layer particleboard...

have a L-shaped living-dining room combo. no real separation from front door, just opens into living room. so want to put in about 5'x5' area of tile right inside front door. had a friend help me put in new front door unit, so went ahead and replaced entranceway particle with 5/8 ply, ran it under the new door unit beforehand....

so question 3: the tile area in entranceway will surely be higher than finished carpet in rest of room. what do i do about baseboard? figured best option was to cut down bottom edge of base in the tile area. sure don't want to stair step the trim.

question 4: what is best edge option at tile/carpet transition? this will be pretty high traffic, constant vacuuming... will the simple tuck on tack strips be sufficient? is there a better option? i was thinking of using the schluter edging and burying it in the thinset when i lay the tiles, to give the tiles a good clean termination point (sure wish i had done that at the doorway into kitchen tile - don't know what i'm gonna do there) but don't know the best option for the carpet side, to ensure longevity and make it feel unnoticeable under-foot.

looking for replies from experienced, pro carpet and tile guys only. thanks!!

firstimereno 08-07-2012 10:00 PM

no replies/help... gee, thanks.

JazMan 08-07-2012 10:37 PM

Hi First,

I'm no carpet guy, although I have in the past installed some. Tile is more my style.

1. I would raise the base about 3/8" or so.

2. Not sure if there's a specific amount, but about 3/4" should be good. Let the carpet guys do it the way they do it.

1/2" ply subfloor with particle board over it. Not a good thing, but for carpet I guess it's ok. Good thing you replace it with plywood for the tile area. You're not gonna install the tiles on this plywood though....are you?

3. You can keep the base approx. the same height, but you're supposed to install shoe molding with hard surfaces such as tile, vinyl and wood.

4. This also depends on the height difference. Use one of the Schluter or similar edgings. There are several types made, but not all available quickly.

If the tiled side is too high the carpet guys can shim it to better blend to the tiles.

Jaz

rusty baker 08-08-2012 09:34 AM

Most old carpet installers like me, prefer the base on the floor. Raising the base only started a few years ago and is not necessary.

joecaption 08-08-2012 09:49 AM

I prefure to let the carpet guys install the carpet then I come back and install the baseboard.
If not there going to be damaging the base as there installing it.
If I know I'm not going to be around after the carpet goes in, I cut soem scraps of base and use that as my gauge. Base is most often 1/2 thick.
Make sure on a long run to use three spacers so there's no sag.

rusty baker 08-08-2012 10:12 AM

Joe, a good installer won't damage the base. Been installing for 40 years. Easier to trim if the base is down and on the floor. If the base is down after, and the carpet ever needs repaired or restretched, the base has to be pulled, then it gets damaged being pulled.

DannyT 08-08-2012 12:33 PM

we always set the base up 1/2 inch for carpet with padding. for tile we left it up 3/8 to give the tile guy a little slack along the wall.

rusty baker 08-08-2012 02:30 PM

The back edge of tack strip is beveled to lock the carpet in when tucked into the baseboard.

firstimereno 08-15-2012 12:46 PM

thanks for the replies so far. conflicting answers, so still dont know what to do. local floor guy says 3/8-1/2" depending on carpet style.
Rusty: you prefer base to be flush on floor... you responded about installing base afterwards, and i agree it would prob be installed too tight, but what about if installed before carpet... you prefer it on the floor but any harm in having up a little, and you can tuck carpet under? as long as its installed at a pre-determined height (3/8-1/2) before carpet is laid - will this still cause probs during re-stretch or repair? i mean do the probs arise b/c its tucked period, or b/c if installed after carpet the base is usually pushed down too tight? can you tell me more about this bevel on the strip - i thought strips just had a rectangular profile. thanks for your help!

rusty baker 08-15-2012 03:49 PM

Go into any old house, all base is on the floor. Look closely at a piece of strip. It is beveled under on the wall side. This was done to help lock down the strip.
But, no it won't hurt if the strip is up 3/8. Any higher and there may be a gap when the carp is tucked in. The reason I prefer it on the floor is that the trimmer can hang up and make the carpet harder to trim.
If the strip is put down the proper distance from the wall, which depends on carpet thickness, and the base is installed after the carpet, the base would need to be pulled back up to remove the carpet. The average carpet lasts 5-7 years. So in 5-7 years, you would need to remove the base to change carpet. Just needless work IMO. Plus base breaks very easily when pulled.

firstimereno 08-20-2012 01:14 AM

thanks for the help and info!!


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