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Old 12-11-2009, 09:55 PM   #1
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Baseboard question


Planning a project to remove ceramic tile and replace it with travertine. Do the baseboards need to be removed?

Oh by the way, a tile setter would be doing the job. Doesnt hurt to learn though, does it?

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Old 12-11-2009, 11:00 PM   #2
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Baseboard question


Yes, the baseboards will most likely have to be removed.

But, did you know that the subfloor stiffness requirements for natural stone are much different than for ceramic or porcelain tiles? Tell us how your subfloor system is built in detail. The type and size of joists, spacing, species and grade if possible, and the unsupported span of the joists.

It is very unusual for a house to be built stiff enough for stone unless it was planned when built. You may need to do some additional framing. Also tell us which method your tile guy is planning to use, again we need details.

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Old 12-11-2009, 11:45 PM   #3
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Baseboard question


I remove base on all floor replacements except carpet. It gives a more porfessional look and does not look like an after thought. I hate! Large grout joints at walls and the use of 1/4 round molding on flooring to hide the gap or expantion joint. To mee it looks cheap even though it cost you more.
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Old 12-12-2009, 10:22 AM   #4
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Baseboard question


shuss,

The most important thing to remember is that ALL tile installations require a 1/4" expansion gap at all the walls. The baseboard generally covers that gap. It's your call.
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Old 12-12-2009, 09:49 PM   #5
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Baseboard question


Here's a picture of what the room looks like. Plan to rip out the carpet and the tile and install travertine.

So, if I dont want to do the quarter round, should the baseboards be removed?
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Old 12-12-2009, 10:13 PM   #6
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Baseboard question


Re-read reply number two.
Re-read reply number three.
Re-read reply number five.
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Old 12-13-2009, 12:58 AM   #7
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Baseboard question


In case you do not feel like rereading.
Or you want suggestion to bounce your thoughts off.

I install the tile in my own house after removing the base boards, it does give a nice finshed look with no shoe mold/

1 issue;
You have round corners this gives you a 2" piece of base on the corner with a 22* on each side, these corners are normally glued on they are to small to nail,they can split, the chance of them being broke upon removal is very good and many times cannot be helped.

Be aware of this and take it easy on the tile guy if it happens. You can also get some wall damage if he is not real careful on the removal, sometimes it just happens and it is unavoidable.

With these pros and cons perhaps you can make a better choice.
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Old 12-13-2009, 01:01 AM   #8
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Baseboard question


Hi Bud,

Just making triply sure, since I dont want to mess things up in our new home

Now that removing them cannot be avoided, let me ask you this. Is it easy to remove and replace them back? I dont want them to be ruined during the removal process.

Is it OK to leave them where are the carpet area was?
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Old 12-13-2009, 01:21 AM   #9
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Baseboard question


Good info 26yrs... my tile guy has not mentioned this to me yet. But I still do have time to interview more installers. I only hope that the chipped baseboard pieces can be remade somehow
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Old 12-13-2009, 04:23 PM   #10
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Baseboard question


The baseboards are generally easy to remove. If they have been caulked to the walls prior to painting the caulk must be gently and purposefully cut first. A thin wide putty knife can then be used to pry the baseboards away from the walls. They will separate easily. Once loose they can be tugged and will in some cases remove themselves with a little tugging.

The fasteners will likely stay with the baseboard. They can later be removed with a pliers by pulling them through from the backside, this way there will be no damage to the face from trying to push the fasteners back out the way they were put in originally. The corners should be removed last. This is because some will come off while removing the baseboard. Even if they are glued they can be encouraged to come away from the wall usually without breaking. If they were originally nailed then they are most likely already cracked and may have to be repaired or replaced. Some damage may occur but it shouldn't be much at all if the tradesman has any experience.

When the baseboards are reinstalled they will likely be higher than they were originally, this is a good thing because the new fasteners will be finding "new meat" to anchor into.
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Old 12-13-2009, 04:46 PM   #11
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Baseboard question


You need to plan on some damage and probably replacing a few that split and especially the small one because they will most likely break. Now you might get lucky and they might all come off nice and easy, but you shouldn't count on it. Sometimes the trim guys get carried away and put 50 nails in because they got trigger happy. No matter how skilled you are you aren't going to get those kind of baseboards off perfectly 100% of the time. Even so, finding the same profile and matching it up should be a big deal if you want the nice clean look without the shoe moulding. Going the way of removing the baseboards seems to be more common in NE and the Midwest while production building and other areas almost always use shoe moulding because it is faster and cheaper.

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