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Old 05-21-2010, 12:06 PM   #106
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Unintended kitchen remodel


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Four bucks...I dunno...that's pretty extravagant don't you think?
Yup, I like living large! Drinks on the house (as long as you're taking tap water)!

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Old 05-22-2010, 09:40 PM   #107
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Unintended kitchen remodel


So, yesterday the guest bedroom toilet decided not to shut off. Innerds appear to be original to the house (circa late 70's). Of course, the shutoff wouldn't budge, so I had to shut off the whole house water to fix it. Pretty straight-forward repair.

However, while the water was off, decided it was high time to DO SOMETHING IN THE KITCHEN! I unconnected the shutoff for the ice maker water supply. After 1/2 hour, the darn thing was still dripping. I stuffed some bread in it to stop it (if it works for soldering, it would work for this), and cut up a sheet of drywall to go on the wall. Managed to get holes/cuts in the right place for the water supply, two outlets and one corner wrap around the window.

That's all I had time to work on house projects yesterday. But at least I finally did something in the kitchen again.

(There's an extra 3' of wall to the left that's still missing drywall. This is where the kitchen sink was. I'm waiting to drywall it until I have the new sink cabinet built and ready to install, since I'll have to disconnect water and drainage lines which are still hooked up to the dishwasher. It would be a pain to disconnect and then re-connect everything again, and I can't face having to hand-wash all the dishes again! Anyway, I ran out of drywall nails, so there.)

Today I was dreading having to start mudding. My wife saved me by enlisting me to help paint the living room. Then she insisted on playing golf this afternoon. What a gal!
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Old 05-22-2010, 10:35 PM   #108
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Unintended kitchen remodel


Some guys have all the luck!!!
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Old 05-24-2010, 09:30 PM   #109
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Unintended kitchen remodel


Well, the lucky streak ended: I did mudding and taping today. Funny, seems that now that I've started, it's not so bad. Don't know why I had such a mental block about getting this part started.

I only ran into one problem. The first mud batch (I mix my own from powder form) was only enough to do the kitchen wall. I mixed another batch to do the old and new panel areas. However, for some reason the mud set up quickly, and I couldn't finish one of the walls before the mud was unusable. I don't know what happened. Got discouraged, and just cleaned up the tools, instead of finishing.

Most of what I mudded today will be behind cabinets, so I'm not going to do much finishing in those areas. The exposed walls around the old and new panels will be a bit more of a challenge, since they're textured walls, and I've always dealt with flat walls in the past. Hopefully not any real problems there.

Meanwhile, I bought a 4x8 sheet of plywood (sanded on both surfaces) and a 1x8x8 strip of poplar. I'll do a bit of designing tonight, and use these to build a replacement sink cabinet. Nothing fancy, just trying to match the existing cabinets (alas).
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Old 05-26-2010, 01:11 AM   #110
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Made a deail with the wife: If you sand the drywall, I'll work on the cabinet. What a gal!

So I only started designing the cabinet this morning, and it took a little while. First I had to put the residual piece of cabinet back in its place, so I could figure out dimensions for the new cabinet. Turns out the right side of the old sink's face frame is still attached to the residual piece. To remove/replace that, I'd have to basically remove the whole face frame from that cabinet and replace it with a rebuilt one. Way too much work, particularly since I'd also have to remove and reinstall all the existing drawer hardware currently attached (six sets) -- no time, no energy, no thanks!

So the plan is to build a face frame section that can be attached to the existing face frame. I'm anticipating this might be tricky, but it's the best of a number of bad options. Anyway, they'll be painted white, so caulk will (hopefully) solve all ills.

Once I had all my calcs, I realized I could barely read my handwriting. So I spent a little time on the computer, using PowerPoint to sketch out plans, including cutting guides for both the plywood and the poplar board. Helps to plan ahead to avoid waste.
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Old 05-26-2010, 01:23 AM   #111
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Unintended kitchen remodel


Next step was to cut some wood! Finally my chance to use the new Ridgid R4511 table saw.

So, the first problem is that the largest fence-supported cut this saw can make is 31.5". I needed a minimum 33-3/8" cut to get started on the plywood.

Oh well, back to basics. I set up the sheet outside, with a 2x4 support below, a straight piece of 1x4 clamped as a cutting guide, and my trusty circular saw.

Okay, I wish I'd been smart enough to simply cut to the exact width I needed. However, not thinking, I decided to cut it a little wider, and trim it up on the saw, so I could have a cleaner final cut. However, not wanting to risk cutting too wide (and risk losing sheet space for the remaining pieces), I only cut it about 1/2" wider than needed. With the blade width added in, I had LESS than 1/2" I needed to trim off.

Have you ever tried to cut a large piece of plywood on a table saw with less than 1/2" between the blade and fence? Without a sacrificial fence added? Not a comfortable cut, that one. The piece was still too wide to put the fence on the other side of the piece. It was a bit iffy toward the end of the cut, but I think it turned out okay.
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Old 05-26-2010, 01:38 AM   #112
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Unintended kitchen remodel


Okay, with that done, I could cut up the remaining pieces. Cut the plywood and poplar board to the final sizes needed (used the miter saw for cross-cuts on the board).

Next step was to load up the stacked dado blades in the table saw to cut some dados and rabbets. Experimented with scraps to get the right width (I wanted them snug) and height of the dado cut, then ran the actual pieces through.

I haven't got a throat plate for the dado blades, and didn't want to take time to try to make one today. With the larger pieces I was working with, I didn't think operating with no throat plate would be an issue.

For the rabbets, I definitely needed a sacrificial fence. Putting the metal fence right up to the dado blades is an invitation to destroy your fence, your blades, and possibly some body parts when the metal goes flying. I simply clamped some scrap plywood to both sides of the fence, then gently slid the fence over the running dado blades about a centimeter. Then I aligned the fence back into proper position, tested with a scrap, and ran the work pieces.

That should do it for the saws today.
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Old 05-26-2010, 02:02 AM   #113
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Unintended kitchen remodel


Now for some assembly.

I plan to use glue for the carcass assembly, supported with screws for the bottom of the cabinet that fits into the dados, and nails for the back that goes into the rabbets.

First thing to do was to drill holes for the screws. It's easiest to drill holes from the inside of the dado, then flip the piece to drill using a counter-sink bit (to allow the screws to go in flush). This takes the guess work out of locating the proper screw locations from the outside.

Next step was to glue up the rabbets on the side pieces to accept the back. Because there's no guesswork for locating the rabbets, I simply used a nail gun to secure them. No clamps needed.

Now here's where I must confess that I'm an idiot. I was trying to be so careful about my cuts, but I got on a roll and lost focus when making my dado cuts. Instead of cutting a dado into the piece destined to be the back, I cut it into the piece destined to be the bottom!

Innocent mistake, no? Maybe. However, my idiocy is demonstrated by the fact that I didn't notice the error until AFTER I glued and nailed the "bottom" to the back. After all, there was a foot difference in length between the pieces. But NO, I didn't notice until it was glued and nailed up. [Sigh...]

Okay, not a complete disaster. I'll trim a foot off the remaining piece to convert it to a new bottom, and take the trimmed-off piece and attach it above the shorted back. Nobody (outside of me, my wife and anybody reading this) will ever know the difference. But I'm still bummed....

LESSON LEARNED: ALWAYS DRY-FIT BEFORE FINAL ASSEMBLY.

I was planning on finishing the carcass assembly tonight, but I got pulled into a late dinner, then had to watch the DWTS finale. Tomorrow is another day.
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Last edited by Itsdanf; 05-26-2010 at 09:53 AM.
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Old 05-26-2010, 09:35 PM   #114
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Unintended kitchen remodel


Well, ran into a couple more issues with the carcass. First, I also forgot yesterday to cut the toe kicks out of the side sheets. Quickly solved with a jigsaw. Second, my dados were too snug for the bottom to slide into the sides. I put dados and a sacrificial fence back on the saw, and trimmed just a hair off the sides and back of the new bottom, where it fits into the dados. That worked fine. (Good to have a saw that can handle such fine adjustments). Glued and screwed the bottom into the carcass (using 2" deck screws).

Finally, I took the piece I cut off the new bottom, and glued/nailed it above the back, to give the back more height. Looks good, and should work fine.

I sanded the top of the bottom a bit, and my wife polyurethaned the inside of the carcass -- her choice (I would have simply painted it).

Meanwhile, I worked on the face frame. I went back to my original cabinet leftovers, and tweaked some measurements. Then I cut slots in the key joints with a biscuit jointer. I glued and clamped some of the joints, but didn't have enough long clamps, so I'll finish the glue-up later-- probably tomorrow; I'm feeling lazy again..... .

...oh heck, there's only two more joints to glue. I'll do it now, so I can start anew tomorrow.
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Old 05-26-2010, 09:57 PM   #115
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Unintended kitchen remodel


Hi Dan...couple of things.

What kind of drill bit is that which kind of messed up your plywood?

Looks like you and I have the same biscuit joiner. One of the very best.

And you think nobody else is going to find out about your little mistake? Noooooo...I'm going to email everyone I know on the planet and tell them, then I'm going to get them to email everyone they know...and ...
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Old 05-27-2010, 01:10 AM   #116
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Hi Dan...couple of things.

What kind of drill bit is that which kind of messed up your plywood?
Sears Craftsman. Finest quality woodworking tools known to man (at least, the man across the counter about 20 years ago... ). The plywood won't be exposed, so I'm not concerned about it. The bits do work better on solid wood, for what it's worth... (not much).

Quote:
Originally Posted by cocobolo View Post
Hi Dan...couple of things.

Looks like you and I have the same biscuit joiner. One of the very best.
I've been pretty pleased with it, thanks. All problems I've had with it have been caused by the clumsy operator.

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Hi Dan...couple of things.

And you think nobody else is going to find out about your little mistake? Noooooo...I'm going to email everyone I know on the planet and tell them, then I'm going to get them to email everyone they know...and ...
...and I'll be an internet virual sensation?!?!? If that's what it takes, I've got a lifetime of material to add to it. But I ain't gonna share.

Meanwhile, I got the rest of the face frame glued up. Had an interesting challenge with the bottom part of the frame. To match the existing cabinets, it's only 1/2" high. Made it difficult to attach to the adjacent piece. I finally put a biscuit slot UP into the middle of the two pieces, and glued a biscuit into it, with 1/2 of it sticking out the bottom. When it's set up tomorrow, I'll saw off the exposed biscuit, and hopefully it will all hold.

Next challenge: How to connect the new face frame to the adjacent cabinet's face frame. I anticipate lots of fun and foul language....
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Old 05-27-2010, 10:07 AM   #117
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just some thoughts... label your pieces with pencil on back side, pencil allows change of mind. also make an insert for your table saw out of plywood then bring your dado blades up while saw is on ,that way your material has support all thru the cut. save insert for later use
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Old 05-27-2010, 01:18 PM   #118
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just some thoughts... label your pieces with pencil on back side, pencil allows change of mind. also make an insert for your table saw out of plywood then bring your dado blades up while saw is on ,that way your material has support all thru the cut. save insert for later use
Thanks Tpolk, good feedback.

I (almost) always use pencils to mark my pieces. Alas, this quick project seemed so simple, I didn't this time -- with the results you'd expect. Even my wife didn't argue when I said I'd been an idiot. (...not that she ever argues when I say that).

And pencils are preferable over pens, markers, etc., since they won't bleed through finish later.

When I first got the saw earlier this year, I fully intended to make my own hardwood dado throat plates/inserts, as well as a permanent fence face, a slip-over sacrificial fence, feather boards, etc. Two things stopped me: 1) I was missing a LOT of saw parts at time of purchase, which took months to rectify with Ridgid and THD; this took a toll on my "momentum" with the new toy. 2) as mentioned in a previous post, I'm going to be leaving retirement soon, so I have to hurry to finish projects in the house before I'm off for the new job/career. I expect to be putting the saw in mothballs or sell it soon, so I've put off any more of the fun stuff. In this case, even a jury-rigged throat plate (not focused too much on depth, rounded-corner fit, etc.) didn't seem worth the effort.

Being in a hurry sucks. I miss retirement already!
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Old 05-29-2010, 05:01 PM   #119
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Yesterday I finished up the face frame, cutting off the exposed biscuit (that joint will hold just fine) and sanding everything down.

My wife primed it, so it's ready for painting.
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Old 05-29-2010, 05:05 PM   #120
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Also yesterday, I finally tried my hand at wall texturing. Not my favorite thing, particularly since I was trying to match the texture of the original wall. I don't think I had the right kind of texturing brush. The wife wasn't pleased. Neither was I. However, I think it will be unnoticable to casual observation when primed/painted.
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