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Old 09-20-2010, 11:33 PM   #91
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Screenhouse in the woods


The oak you have is harder for both reasons. Most of the harder woods, and even some soft woods - like hemlock and Douglas fir for example - get very noticeably harder with age.

How about some Douglas fir? That's a moderately resistant wood, easy to work when it's new, takes paint or stain well and not expensive.

I'm sure whatever you use is going to look excellent, just like everything else you have done there.

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Old 09-21-2010, 12:25 AM   #92
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Screenhouse in the woods


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Originally Posted by jules4 View Post
My model may require a little tunning . . .

The 1/4 inch strips are there because I’m a little thick.

I put them in to make a gap between the skirt board and the top stair tread (to shed water) - until you asked about them it hadn’t occurred to me that I could just offset the tread on the stringers by 1/4" and achieve exactly the same effect.
I see your thinking now, thanks for explaining.
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Old 10-05-2010, 11:36 PM   #93
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Screenhouse in the woods


i love what i see.
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Old 10-14-2010, 01:58 PM   #94
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Screenhouse in the woods


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i love what i see.
Thanks!
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Old 10-14-2010, 02:36 PM   #95
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Screenhouse in the woods


I managed to sneak down to the cottage over Thanksgiving weekend to do a bit more work.

First, I installed the trim that I'd previously finished painting - the skirt boards and trim for the sides of the posts. Lots more trim to go obviously (I got two coats of primer on the next batch of trim, but still need to do two finish coats before I can put it up).

Due to the troublesome nature of red paint, I'll need to go over everything with at least one or two top coats to even out the colour, but that will have to wait until next spring. (I am hoping to get the rest of the trim installed this fall though.)

These pictures were taken after I'd caulked all the nail holes and seams (except the bottom seams - those stay open) and had spot primed and painted:






Next on the to-do list was installing the extra rafter-ties that Gary (with his preternaturally sharp eyesight) noticed were needed to stabilize the 3:1 cantilever of the fly-rafter blocks.

For the front block I nailed the tie (the silver one on the right, not the one painted black) to the block and to the side of the rafter girt, then bent the tie 90° around the end of the rafter girt (I’m sure this compromised its strength, but it’s got to be better than having nothing there).




I made the ties for the two middle blocks all pretty-like by painting them black first (since they’ll be more visible):




Finally here’s a picture of my temporary stairs - as you can see, a local rock gave me some issues, resulting in a hurriedly cobbled together “floating stringer.” I’m going to have to work out a better (i.e., more solid) way of navigating a stringer around the rock while still supporting the edge of the upper steps.




Last edited by jules4; 10-14-2010 at 04:10 PM.
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Old 10-14-2010, 03:11 PM   #96
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Screenhouse in the woods


Quote:
Originally Posted by jules4 View Post
I managed to sneak down to the cottage over Thanksgiving weekend to do a bit more work.

First, I installed the trim that I'd previously finished painting - the skirt boards and trim for the sides of the posts. Lots more trim to go obviously (I got two coats of primer on the next batch of trim, but still need to do two finish coats before I can put it up).

Due to the troublesome nature of red paint, I'll need to go over everything with at least one or two top coats to even out the colour, but that will have to wait until next spring. (I am hoping to get the rest of the trim installed this fall though.)

These pictures were taken after I'd caulked all the nail holes and seams (except the bottom seams - those stay open) and had spot primed and painted:






Next on the to-do list was installing the extra rafter-ties that Gary (with his preternaturally sharp eyesight) noticed were needed to stabilize 3:1 cantilever of the fly-rafter blocks.

For the front block I nailed the tie (the silver one on the right, not the one painted black) to the block and to the side of the rafter girt, then bent the tie 90° around the end of the rafter girt (I’m sure this compromised its strength, but it’s got to be better than having nothing there).




I made the ties for the two middle blocks all pretty-like by painting them black first (since they’ll be more visible):




Finally here’s a picture of my temporary stairs - as you can see, a local rock gave me some issues, resulting in a hurriedly cobbled together “floating stringer.” I’m going to have to work out a better (i.e., more solid) way of navigating a stringer around the rock while still supporting the edge of the upper steps.



I see you had some nice weather back your way over the Thanksgiving weekend...at least judging by the sunshine in your pics.

Perhaps you could put a small concrete footing under the bottom of the stringer to give it some stability.

Alternatively, you could always shift the big rock...dynamite???
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Old 10-14-2010, 03:35 PM   #97
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Screenhouse in the woods


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I see your thinking now, thanks for explaining.
This was a poor choice of words that could be very misleading. I should have said "I understand what you are saying now", I'm sorry if I sounded like a smart butt, I didn't mean too.

You have done a fantastic job, it looks great.
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Last edited by BigJim; 10-14-2010 at 03:39 PM.
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Old 10-14-2010, 04:06 PM   #98
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Screenhouse in the woods


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Originally Posted by cocobolo View Post
I see you had some nice weather back your way over the Thanksgiving weekend...at least judging by the sunshine in your pics.

Perhaps you could put a small concrete footing under the bottom of the stringer to give it some stability.

Alternatively, you could always shift the big rock...dynamite???
It was beautiful weather - nice temps too, it actually stayed above 10° all three nights.

You and my dad clearly share the same sense of humour - his first comment when I showed him was, "Well why didn't you just move the rock?"
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Old 10-14-2010, 04:08 PM   #99
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Screenhouse in the woods


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Originally Posted by jiju1943 View Post
This was a poor choice of words that could be very misleading. I should have said "I understand what you are saying now", I'm sorry if I sounded like a smart butt, I didn't mean too.

You have done a fantastic job, it looks great.
Thanks! And I didn't take it that way at all - but I spend a lot of time around smart butts so I'm probably immune.
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Old 10-14-2010, 06:45 PM   #100
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Screenhouse in the woods


Screen door (re)construction

Rather than making a new screen door for the screen house out of new flat-sawn wood,

I decided to rebuild an old (partly rotted) 4-panel screen door since it was made with nice, old-growth rift-sawn spruce, which is much better wood than what I could get now.

The old door was originally fully screened, but I want to put solid panels in the bottom so I needed to cut a groove to hold the panels.
In the process of accomplishing this I've finally mastered the use of the Stanley 45 combination plane (although I wimped out and did a simple rabbit rather than a dado).


On the subject of Stanely's, I've also attached a picture of my pride and joy - a Bailey #4 that I restored this summer (pictured next to it's unrestored brethren, to give you an idea of the state it was in). You can hardly even tell that there's a bad break in the tote.

I used West System Epoxy mixed with walnut wood flour (I didn't have any rosewood flour) to repair the tote, and more-or-less followed this guys technique for cleaning it up: http://www.majorpanic.com/handplane_restor1.htm.

After just a few months of plane-ownership, I honestly have no idea how ever managed to get by without one.
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Screenhouse in the woods-pa140007.jpg   Screenhouse in the woods-pa140012.jpg   Screenhouse in the woods-pa140013.jpg  
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Old 10-14-2010, 08:48 PM   #101
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Screenhouse in the woods


Quote:
Originally Posted by jules4 View Post
Screen door (re)construction

Rather than making a new screen door for the screen house out of new flat-sawn wood,

I decided to rebuild an old (partly rotted) 4-panel screen door since it was made with nice, old-growth rift-sawn spruce, which is much better wood than what I could get now.

The old door was originally fully screened, but I want to put solid panels in the bottom so I needed to cut a groove to hold the panels.
In the process of accomplishing this I've finally mastered the use of the Stanley 45 combination plane (although I wimped out and did a simple rabbit rather than a dado).


On the subject of Stanely's, I've also attached a picture of my pride and joy - a Bailey #4 that I restored this summer (pictured next to it's unrestored brethren, to give you an idea of the state it was in). You can hardly even tell that there's a bad break in the tote.

I used West System Epoxy mixed with walnut wood flour (I didn't have any rosewood flour) to repair the tote, and more-or-less followed this guys technique for cleaning it up: http://www.majorpanic.com/handplane_restor1.htm.

After just a few months of plane-ownership, I honestly have no idea how ever managed to get by without one.
It's a real crime to let a good plane even get close to a state of disrepair like that...but a hearty "well done" on the cleaned up version. At least it is obviously now in the hands of someone who cares.

Great job.
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Old 10-31-2010, 08:19 PM   #102
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Screenhouse in the woods


Quote:
Originally Posted by jules4 View Post
Screen door (re)construction

Rather than making a new screen door for the screen house out of new flat-sawn wood,

I decided to rebuild an old (partly rotted) 4-panel screen door since it was made with nice, old-growth rift-sawn spruce, which is much better wood than what I could get now.

The old door was originally fully screened, but I want to put solid panels in the bottom so I needed to cut a groove to hold the panels.
In the process of accomplishing this I've finally mastered the use of the Stanley 45 combination plane (although I wimped out and did a simple rabbit rather than a dado).


On the subject of Stanely's, I've also attached a picture of my pride and joy - a Bailey #4 that I restored this summer (pictured next to it's unrestored brethren, to give you an idea of the state it was in). You can hardly even tell that there's a bad break in the tote.

I used West System Epoxy mixed with walnut wood flour (I didn't have any rosewood flour) to repair the tote, and more-or-less followed this guys technique for cleaning it up: http://www.majorpanic.com/handplane_restor1.htm.

After just a few months of plane-ownership, I honestly have no idea how ever managed to get by without one.
That is a lot of difference, that looks great.
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Old 12-28-2010, 10:47 AM   #103
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Screenhouse in the woods


Time to finally get around to posting my last update of the year for this project.

I snuck down for a week and half at the end of November and managed to get all the major stuff finished before the cottage was closed up on December 6.

Sat-Sun (Nov 27-28)
I’d previously planed the screen stop into the profile I wanted (top and side stops are finished with a simple round over, the bottom stop is bevelled to shed water), so it was just a matter of cutting it to size and installing it.



When installing I coped the joints so they would stay tight (tighter than mitres anyway).




Mon-Tues (Nov 29-30)
I started installing the screen rail on Monday (first day I brought the camera out with me too, which is why you see screen rail installed in the right-hand window in the previous pics).

I used flanged screen rail for all the windows. The place I ordered it from offered a colour choice of white (yuck) - I would have preferred brown, but oh well.

I was originally going to use storm window clips to hold all the screens in place so they’d be removable, but the upper windows were too large for the screenrail to support without adding bracing. So, I wound up drilling holes in the flange and screwing the rail for the upper windows to the stops.



Cutting 44 pieces of screen rail for the knee-wall windows for the SECOND time, after failing to subtract the length of the corner segments the first time around:



I also shimmed the door in place so I could install the hinges and spring latch. I picked up the idea of using playing cards to shim doors (among many other brilliant ideas) from Basswood over on our sister site Contractor Talk, I highly recommend checking out his thread card tricks for carpenters. Check out the published articles on his website too - guy's a genius with wood: Basswood Architectural Carpentry




Wed-Fri (Dec 1-3)
Since it rained almost every day I put up a tarp to allow me to install the siding in relative comfort:



Finished siding - the gaps at the top are because I left off the top-most pieces of siding to be installed after the trim on the rafter girts/beams is put up in the spring. (I installed my drip edge over the skirt board prior to siding.)



Got the door installed too - it’s starting to look like a real building now!



Part two of this update to follow . . .

Last edited by jules4; 12-28-2010 at 10:57 AM.
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Old 12-28-2010, 01:11 PM   #104
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Screenhouse in the woods


Sat-Sun (Dec 4-5)
Finished knee-wall windows installed with storm-window clips:






To make sure the screen in the large upper windows didn’t have any sags/waves in it, I used small scraps of spline to anchor the corners while rolling as Thurman describes here: http://www.diychatroom.com//showthread.php?p=445232.

Thurman’s advice worked a treat - I installed the screens in gale-force winds, yet they still came out perfectly straight and tight. I’ve put together a little pictorial of the screen rolling process which might come in handy for someone else needing to install large screens in place:

Start by using a 12" scrap of spline to anchor both sides of the upper left corner:


Cut a piece of spline long enough to (more than) go all the way around the window. Pull the screen straight across (use one line of the screen material as a guide) the top of the window to the upper right corner. Start rolling your permanent spline from the right to the left (start rolling from the middle of your piece of spline so the join between the two ends will occur on the bottom of the window).





Note: I had a lot of problems with the spline roller slicing up the screen - the best solution I was able to come up with was to angle the roller slightly to the outside so that it just cut into the excess screen (would love to know how to avoid these cuts altogether - the cold weather may have had something to do with it, I expect the spline would be a lot softer in the summer and so easier to roll).



When you reach the upper left corner pull out the temp spline and roll the permanent spline in its place (keep some tension on the outside edge of the screen as your roll to keep the screen straight - if it veers off at any point pull the spline up and re-roll it straight).



Pull the screen straight down to the lower left corner and anchor that corner with the temp spline, then roll your permanent spline down the left side (removing the temp spline when you hit the corner).





The top and left side of the screen are now held tight, the bottom and right side are still loose - as you can see from this picture, the screen is still pretty wavy at this point:



Continued next post . . .

Last edited by jules4; 12-28-2010 at 01:16 PM.
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Old 12-28-2010, 01:12 PM   #105
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Screenhouse in the woods


. . . continued from previous post

On the right side of the window, pull the screen straight down to the lower right corner and secure this corner with the temp spline, then roll the permanent spline from the upper right corner to the lower right corner.



With three sides attached (and straight) the screen should be nice and flat now with no waves or sags. Roll one end of spline from the lower right corner to the left, and the other end of spline from the lower left corner to the right, trimming one (or both) ends so that they butt tightly against each other in the spline groove.





I’ve pressed my hand against the screen in one of the front windows to show how nice and taunt the screen is using this method.




Mon (Dec 6)
Spent Monday tarping the screen house for the winter to keep the rain and snow out.



The water no longer looks very inviting - BRRR!


Now I just have to wait for spring so I can finish the trim and various interior details.

*drums fingers impatiently while glaring at snow outside*


Last edited by jules4; 12-28-2010 at 04:39 PM.
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