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Old 05-11-2007, 04:44 AM   #1
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Reptile Cage Finished


I just finished building a cage for my pet chameleon. It is my first attempt at builing anything out of wood. I usually sculpt alot of stuff out of foam, which I made the rock wall out of. The cage will be mounted on a table in order to make it stand higher. I was going to make a cabinet table for it, but I ran out of money I'll add that in later. 1st pic is my plans. 2nd pic is the finished product




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Old 05-11-2007, 05:18 PM   #2
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Looks good!

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Old 05-11-2007, 07:07 PM   #3
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Awesome cage! Can you go into detail about "sculpting foam"? Looks pretty lifelike in the pics!
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Old 05-11-2007, 08:42 PM   #4
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Thanks for the support. The foam is really easy to work with. I use the same type of foam that those cheap 99 cent coolers are made out of. You can buy it in 8 x 4 sheets at dry wall construction supply stores. Don't buy foam at craft stores in less you really need it or if it is a special type. Craft stores overprice everything. Here is the materials I used to sculpt the rock wall.

-Foam sheets (as described)
-quick set tile mortar (used as a hardener)
-concrete dye (use as a base color)
-various colors of laytex paints (what ever color you choose. Usually lighter than the base color)
-concrete acrylic fortifier (used to help the bond and make it more waterproof)
-big sponge
-A bunch of old house paint brushes
-Hot knife or anything like it
-kitchen steak knife
-various grades of sand paper and a sanding block

1)lay/draw out the shapes of the rocks on a foam sheet with a sharpie marker
2) Use the hot knife or steak knife to cut out the rock shapes.
(remember where everything fits. It will be like a giant puzzle)
I also prefer to use the hot knife because it cuts through foam like butter. With the steak knife, you need to score the foam and snap it off. If you want a smooth edge, you need to sand it down.
3) take a rock shape that you just cut and bevel the edges so they are not so square/flat. You can also use a wood burning tool to create grooves into the foam etc.
4)use a sanding block to sand down any sharp corners and smooth out cuts
5)reapeat steps 3-4 until all rocks are done
6)glue all peices down to another solid foam sheet and put it together how it was originally laid out. I used a foam to wood glue and a caulking gun.
7) mix tile mortar with just the right amount of acrylic fortifier in order to get it to a paintable thickness. You don't want it to be drippy though. (I don't remember how much I used, so you need to use your best judgement)
8) mix in concrete dye with the mortar mix in order to get your base color in.
9) Grab a paintbrush and start covering all the nooks and crannies of the foam rocks. Completly cover it, but don't make it too thick. Before the mortar dries, pat it down with the big foam sponge in order to get rid of the paint strokes. The strokes will really show up later on if you don't do this. Allow mortar to dry overnight and repeat at least 2 more times.
10) Next take a lighter color compared to the base color and use a dry brush technique to paint over the rocks. This technique is typically used in hobby painting, model railroad, sculpture etc. What you do is get a little bit of paint on the end of a large flat house paint brush and wipe it off on a paper towel. You want the paint to be practically dry. Then you gently brush over the surface of the rock. You don't want to cover all the cracks and fine details of the rock. You are merley brushing the surface. This will bring out all of the features that you carved out. I would suggest not using a color that is really close to the base color. I would go with something that is about 4-5 shades lighter. You want it to contrast. Start lightly and apply more coats if you think it is still too dark.
11)Do the same as step 10 if you want a third color. Usually the lightest color and it is applied very lightly.
12) After everything is painted, fill up a spray bottle with the concrete acrylic fortifier and soak/spray the entire rock wall. Let it dry and repeat as nessecary.

That's basically it. I wish I took pics during the process. Next time I do this I will take pics of my progress. Remember to use laytex house paint. You can also use acrylic and certain enemal paints. Spray paint will melt the foam. Some people use acidtone or torches to melt the foam away because it is faster. I don't recommend doing this because you have no control over what form the foam will take. Also remember to gather as much visual reference that you can. I looked at about 50 different rock walls and tried to mimic them in mine. Make sure that it doesn't look man made. That means, no perfect square, triangle, circular, or straight shapes.Hope this helps.

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Old 05-12-2007, 10:40 PM   #5
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Awesome!
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Old 05-13-2007, 05:15 PM   #6
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Thanks a million for that description! I want to build a waterfall for my pond. I was considering using real rocks but its hard to do it in a way to control the water flow. Do you know how this type of foam would hold up outdoors and with water flowing over it?
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Old 05-13-2007, 05:25 PM   #7
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This type of foam is water proof and mold proof. People also use it for fireplaces. There are foam cutting companies everywhere. If you can find one near you, they might sell you pre cut blocks of foam or custom cut peices that you need. The foam cutting companies usually work for construction sites and know how to coat the foam for specific applications. Last time I went there, they where making a bunch of fireplace mantles out of foam. The side wall at my house is made of foam sheets that where screwed against the original wood gate in panels. Then we sprayed it down with a product called permacrete.(http://www.permacrete.com/) It is like concrete, but way stronger. The finished wall looks exactly like a concrete wall. We had it for five years and there hasn't been any problems with it. The sprinkler water hasn'st caused any damage either. At the PermaCrete headquarters, they have a waterfall/koi pond that they made out of foam and permacrete.
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Old 05-13-2007, 10:39 PM   #8
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Hey Marc, thanks for the great info! I have to pic your brain a bit more. Let me give you some quick background info...we have a 2 story stick frame home, about 20 y/o. It has bad windows and faded dented aluminum siding. Some of our neighbors have done what I thought was stucco, but after looking at pictures on that permacrete.com, I think thats what they had done. Anyway, my wife and I have loved the look of the "stucco" houses since people started doing them around here but were leary about doing it. Now that I think this permacrete is what they are doing, I am really interested in talking to someone who does this, or if it is a DIY type project. Are you a permacrete installer? Did you find a local installer? How much per square foot is permacrete, installed on an exterior wall? I filled out their "find a local dealer" form and am waiting on a response. Thanks again!
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Old 05-13-2007, 10:59 PM   #9
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I'm not a permacrete installer. But I know someone who is a certified installer/dealer. That is how I was able to try it out at my house. We experimented with different types of patterns and applications. As far as the thickness on my wall, the permacrete layer was probably as thick as a quarter.(coin) The stuff is supposed to be stronger than concrete. That is why we didn't need to put it on so thick. So far it is holding up with no visible cracks. As far as pricing, I don't know how much it costs. Since I agreed to help the guy out on some projects as long as he paid for the material. But I think the stuff is expensive because he made sure we didn't waste any of it or spill it on the ground. Your probably better off talking to the permacrete dealers if you want to know more about it. But as far as DIY. It is a fun and simple project, depending on how complicated you make it. If you do try it. Be careful because the stuff dries really fast. (in a matter of minutes). To apply it on the wall, I loaded a sprayer with a big hopper with permacrete and sprayed it on and someone else knocked it down to add the texture. It is a 2 man project because of the fast drying time.

Last edited by Marc10edora; 05-13-2007 at 11:04 PM.
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Old 05-13-2007, 11:01 PM   #10
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Thanks man! I am hoping they get back to me. I cant find a whole lot of info on the web, except whats on their site. I dont expect it to be cheap, I realise that its a big job, I'm just trying to get an idea and compare to stucco and sunthetic stucco.
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Old 06-08-2007, 08:33 PM   #11
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side question - are all those materials compatible with your chameleon? Did you seal the final project before putting him in there with something that won't harm him?

I only ask because I remember the insane trouble I had sourcing proper materials to custom build a rock sculpture in my moray eel's tank. Maybe that application just needed way more inert materials since they were submerged in saltwater, dunno
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Old 06-08-2007, 09:29 PM   #12
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JoeBoy,

I made sure everything I used was 100% safe for my chameleon. It is all painted in laytex paint and I sealed it off with acrylic fortifier. The fortifier is harmful when you first apply it and you have to wear gloves. But after it dries, it makes everything like it was plastic. It gives it a water tight clear coat that you won't even be able to tell it was there. I made sure it dried out for two weeks before introducing my lizard to the cage.
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Old 06-08-2007, 09:32 PM   #13
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I've been researching how to sculpt some stuff for a fish tank too. I think because of the salt water, you would have to use some heavy duty materials or the salt water will tear it up. Someone else recommended using epoxy putty to sculpt stuff for tanks. Here is another link that I'm reasearching. It is of a company that sells different epoxy putties and materials to sculpt zoo exhibits. But I'm not sure how well it stands up to a salt water tank. http://www.polygem.com/zoo/zoopoxy.php
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Old 06-09-2007, 11:02 AM   #14
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I actually found a kind of cement I believe it was (almost positive, maybe a concrete) that was used by a large aquarium, so I sourced it out and used that. I used saltwater safe plastic piping, and had to cure the thing forever before it stopped spiking ph levels.

Here's what it looked like. There's actually 2 sculptures i made in there, one is a bunch of tufa rocks joined together, the larger triangle one is the one I made with cement / plastic pipes.
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Old 06-09-2007, 02:30 PM   #15
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Looks very nice. Where's the fish?

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