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Old 01-21-2012, 11:25 AM   #151
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Ok guys I'm listening.
I will get some more pics. There are 2 trusses above 4 windows in the basement.

coco the basement ceiling will be removable to access the junction boxes.

You guys were right there was a screw up. The plans show concrete above the windows.
So now need to figure on doing a support around the windows down stairs.

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Old 01-21-2012, 11:39 AM   #152
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Originally Posted by logluvr View Post
Ok guys I'm listening.
I will get some more pics. There are 2 trusses above 4 windows in the basement.

coco the basement ceiling will be removable to access the junction boxes.

You guys were right there was a screw up. The plans show concrete above the windows.
So now need to figure on doing a support around the windows down stairs.
OK, thanks for your reply. Looking forward to seeing the new pics.

If you go on the link that Gary kindly put up, you will find a section where they show how to reinforce between trusses to carry additional loads. I am quite sure if you do that you won't have any problems.

As an additional safety measure, if you add the plywood I suggested, I'm certain that you will be more than covered. I think the windows in question are only about 3' wide...could you confirm that? That is (fortunately) a very small span to have to take care of.

And yes, I thought you were going to use a removable ceiling of some kind.
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Old 01-21-2012, 01:13 PM   #153
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logluvr...before you do any remedial work, here's a quick check for you to do.

Go upstairs and lay a 4' (or longer) level on the floor right in front of the wall where your basement windows are located.

This will tell you immediately if there is any dip in the floor yet.

If there is any dip, let's say in excess of 1/16", then you should jack up the truss until the floor is level. If it's either none, or less than 1/16" I wouldn't worry about it.

Here's hoping that Gary's eagle eye has caught the problem before it really is a problem.

One other question for you...do you remember if one of the crew was laying beads of glue on top of the trusses before the plywood was laid? Maybe something like PL 400 or a similar construction glue?

Sorry, make that two questions...do you remember if that little pony wall on top of your concrete arrived with the truss package, or did the crew build it in place?
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Old 01-21-2012, 03:05 PM   #154
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cocobolo, first page of her post, box of OSI adhesive and worker with it in hand....

I normally would leave this until OP posts back but don't want her to get to far insulating without reading:

Speaking of things noticed… there are no fire-stopping studs sistered to the basement wall studs in between foamboard sections every 10’ horizontally; http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par031.htm

Also required is fire-blocking at the top of the wall to prevent fire racing into any floor joist cavities, traveling unblocked across the basement ceiling, possibly up through the next story framed wall (kitchen non-bearing wood frame walls—that also require f.b. every 10’ to the logs, per length of wall) to the attic above: http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par011.htm)

That is the main reason for foaming all wiring/plumbing penetrations: second page; How to fireblock framing
The studs should be p.t. wood or wood with a moisture barrier on the face touching concrete, to stop capillary wicking to mold the framing, as per code, #7 here: http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...9_3_sec017.htm

I suggest a sill sealer between the sistered fire-block stud- and layout stud, just “let-in” through the foamboard to prevent a thermal short-circuit to the colder concrete. One might want to use acceptable mineral wool batts for the fire-blocking here; http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par032.htm
The only problem is they don’t stop the warm basement air from reaching the cold concrete wall (to condense) as a stud would. Sill sealer under the wall bottom plate- otherwise it acts as a thermal “heat sink” to warm the concrete slab/wall/footing/earth – unless rigid foam or poly sheeting was used at the perimeter in all locations- fig.14: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...ation-systems;

Be sure to fire-block the top gap over the foamboard between the mudsill/wall top plates (I’d use drywall strip between floor joists), unless already done after the posted pictures. Roxul is a good product, doesn’t wick water, though it is air/vapor permeable. I’d block-off the foamboard, very toxic. http://www.roxul.com/files/RX-NA-EN/...ll%20Sheet.pdf

Gary
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Old 01-21-2012, 08:27 PM   #155
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Gary we are going to put Roxdul insulation up in the pony wall in front of the board insulation my hisband put up between the 2x4 studs on the pony wall.
Also discussing place dry wall up on the ceiling in removable pieces.
A vapor vapor barrier was placed on the concrete first then the pressure treated board.

Coco the pony wall was build in place. Gotta get a 4' level ours are all 2'.
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Old 01-21-2012, 09:34 PM   #156
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Quote:
Originally Posted by logluvr View Post

Coco the pony wall was build in place. Gotta get a 4' level ours are all 2'.
You can always use a straight 4' or longer board, and put that down on the floor. Just check to see if there is any space under it in the middle. Any 4' straight edge will do.

I was hoping you were going to tell me the pony wall came with the trusses. Do you know if they used construction glue to stick the OSB on to the 2 x 4 framing, along with either nails or screws? If they did, you are half way to having a truss wall there. If not, then I still say that if you add 3/4" plywood, glued and screwed to the end 2 x 4's of the trusses themselves, you will be fine. Make the plywood as high as you can and still be able to fit it in place. You will need either 4' 3 1/2" or 6' 3 1/2" for the plywood lengths depending on where your trusses land on the wall.
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Last edited by cocobolo; 01-21-2012 at 09:41 PM. Reason: More info.
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Old 01-21-2012, 09:47 PM   #157
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I'd contact the builder, or a lawyer, is it still under warranty? You don't want the liability for this, that's why you hired the G.C. or S.E. If ever a claim on your H.O. Insurance, who pays or reason not to.......especially with this paper trail you now have. We could help you DIY, but explore the others first, my 2 cents. No offense, coco.

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Old 01-21-2012, 09:53 PM   #158
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Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
I'd contact the builder, or a lawyer, is it still under warranty? You don't want the liability for this, that's why you hired the G.C. or S.E. If ever a claim on your H.O. Insurance, who pays or reason not to.......especially with this paper trail you now have. We could help you DIY, but explore the others first, my 2 cents. No offense, coco.

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Gary, no offense taken I assure you.

In fact earlier today I was discussing just that very idea with someone else. It was, after all the builder who messed up in the first place.

Gary, while you are here, can you tell me if it is routine practice to have a concrete form inspection down your way before the concrete is poured? Thanks.
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Old 01-21-2012, 10:16 PM   #159
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Absolutely! Though some Inspectors are only human.... They should look at set-backs before the footing pour, inspect the wall forms for steel/tying/placement/etc., even notice if the form panels are oiled or not. If not, they will spray them after the inspector leaves, pooling it up on the footing top for a weak/insufficient bond where water can wick later, getting the steel re-bar wet also--- not too smart. A good one would have caught the widow header, though they all have "no liability" clauses, hence the required engineering now. I doubt the frame inspector would even look for the foamboard tops able to burn right into the joist bays above, or the fire-stopping every 10'. I know of 2 out of 15 Inspectors that are "good" in that regard.

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Old 01-21-2012, 10:32 PM   #160
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Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
Absolutely! Though some Inspectors are only human.... They should look at set-backs before the footing pour, inspect the wall forms for steel/tying/placement/etc., even notice if the form panels are oiled or not. If not, they will spray them after the inspector leaves, pooling it up on the footing top for a weak/insufficient bond where water can wick later, getting the steel re-bar wet also--- not too smart. A good one would have caught the window header, though they all have "no liability" clauses, hence the required engineering now. I doubt the frame inspector would even look for the foamboard tops able to burn right into the joist bays above, or the fire-stopping every 10'. I know of 2 out of 15 Inspectors that are "good" in that regard.

Gary
OK then, I'm very glad to hear that.

It has been standard practice up here for longer than I can remember.

Rusty re-bar is a problem, but much of what we use here now is epoxy coated and stays rust free.
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Old 01-21-2012, 10:34 PM   #161
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Coco they did use the adhesive and nailed in on the frame.
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Old 01-21-2012, 10:48 PM   #162
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If you go with a porch concider also having a roof over it or at least have it lower then logs as much as possible and add gutters over the decked areas.
I've inspected several log homes with the two bottom rows of logs rotted out from water splashing up on them.
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Old 01-21-2012, 10:53 PM   #163
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Coco they did use the adhesive and nailed in on the frame.
Thanks logluvr, that's very good news.

If you decide to ask the builder to come and have a look at this, he should know exactly how to fix it for you. Good luck!
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Old 01-21-2012, 10:57 PM   #164
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Agreed, keep us posted!

Good point, Joe!

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Old 01-22-2012, 10:09 AM   #165
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Joe the porch is planned to be covered except for the south side in the plans but hubby changed his mind and wants that side of the house porch covered too.
Thanks for the tip about the porch.

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