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Old 02-15-2012, 08:46 AM   #31
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


Looking very nice...on a side not, I love the doors to the workshop, they are nearly identical to my front door.

What does the bluestone sell for by the pallet?

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Old 02-15-2012, 10:03 AM   #32
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


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What does the bluestone sell for by the pallet?
You may want to be more specific. PA bluestone can be specified many ways -- cut, stand-up, variegated, true blue, lilac, 1", 1.5", 2" thick, etc.

See, for example, this page:
http://paquarriedbluestone.com/productFlagstone.php

The upside down pallet shown in my picture earlier in this thread is a load of random size 1.5" thick stand-up bluestone. Cut stone pricing is higher. I live quite near the NE PA area, so bulk transportation of the stone from the quarry to the distribution point is less costly than say if you lived in TX.

But a rough cost for such as pallet FOB is about $200 -- note though that some stone places sell by the pallet, and other by weight. The pallet you see in my driveway was $250 "dropped off". If you have a truck and a way to offload the load at home, you can pick up pallets of bluestone at the distribution point for around $150-$175 pallet. Some companies also charge a pallet fee, which can be recovered by returning the empty pallets.

I will point out here that the installation effort (and therefore the final cost) of any random size flagstone installation (including PA bluestone) is entirely dependent on how tight you want the joints. You can go broke (by paying someone) and/or dead (from stone dust inhalation) trying to get 1/4" gaps on large areas of irregular flagstone. For this reason, if you want tight gaps and you are on a budget, you may want to use cut bluestone (square or ractangular shapes).

Otherwise I would suggest that you pick your battles. In my case I specified tight joints for the driveway apron, where aesthetically it looks more refined. But the rest of the bluestone on the property is "lay down" style -- you puzzle it until it "mostly fits" and don't worry about cutting lots of stone to make consistent joints. By the way, cutting the apron took 3 days and a bunch of diamond blades. I DO NOT SUGGEST DOING THIS YOURSELF as the stone dust is really, really bad for your lungs.

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compare the above with...


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Old 02-15-2012, 11:03 AM   #33
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


Wrooster, you held out on the first batch of pics regarding the apron!

Nice job on the apron, man that all looks schweet!

When's the BBQ, I'm there?
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Old 02-15-2012, 11:44 AM   #34
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


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Wrooster, you held out on the first batch of pics regarding the apron!
The title of this forum is "DIY" -- and the apron shown above is not "DIY" in the sense that i understand the term "DIY".

A good friend of mine is a mason, and he "has people". And if "those people" constructed the apron (including the ungodly task of cutting the stone to fit), and all I did was stand there, specify what the end result should be, say "looks good to me", and then write a check to cover the stone, labor and beer, well that is not DIY in my book. I have that full time job thing on the side, so I have to go to work every day -- although I would rather do DIY projects...

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Nice job on the apron, man that all looks schweet!
I will tell the mason.

I have met some folks with really nice classic cars, and they say proudly "I just finished this restoration, she's a beauty, ain't she!" -- and later you find out what they really meant is that they just wrote the last check to the shop that restored the vehicle from the axles up. Not to say that there is anything wrong with that particular approach, but at least tell it like it is.

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When's the BBQ, I'm there?


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Old 02-15-2012, 07:56 PM   #35
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


Are you still going to burn fires in the fireplace and put chairs in the pit area? Or are you going to have fires in that pit area and sit around the perimeter? In other words is that a firepit or a patio in front of the old fireplace?
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Old 02-15-2012, 08:53 PM   #36
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Are you still going to burn fires in the fireplace and put chairs in the pit area? Or are you going to have fires in that pit area and sit around the perimeter? In other words is that a firepit or a patio in front of the old fireplace?
LoL, I never imagined building a fire the size of the firepit itself. The county and local fire departments would be here in minutes... they would probably call in an air drop unit to help out.

The fire goes in the fireplace, and people go in //and// on the firepit. The drystack walls for the firepit were sized (height-wise) to sit on.

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Old 02-15-2012, 09:16 PM   #37
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


So then it's a patio, not a firepit or I guess you could even call it a really big hearth. That answers my question thanks.

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Old 02-16-2012, 09:28 AM   #38
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So then it's a patio, not a firepit or I guess you could even call it a really big hearth. That answers my question thanks.
Yes, correct, it is a patio area suitable for chairs, a small table, or simply folks sitting on the stone wall. There *may* be alcohol involved at times.

n.b.
In no case, however, is any Real Wood burned in the fireplace. I made the "action picture" I posted above using Photoshop.

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Old 02-16-2012, 10:01 AM   #39
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


Lol, so life like! You should work in Hollywood doing special effects!
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Old 02-17-2012, 07:53 PM   #40
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


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Yes, correct, it is a patio area suitable for chairs, a small table, or simply folks sitting on the stone wall. There *may* be alcohol involved at times.

n.b.
In no case, however, is any Real Wood burned in the fireplace. I made the "action picture" I posted above using Photoshop.

Wrooster
So it's not functional then? It looks almost like a throne. You could sit there and hold court.
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Old 02-17-2012, 09:10 PM   #41
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


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So it's not functional then?
Correct. I was warned earlier in this thread that burning wood in an open firepit creates pollution. As I subsequently pointed out, I have not been burning wood, but instead have been burning old tires, plastic bottles, and used motor oil. I hope everyone is happy now.

So everyone, please, just continue thinking that I am not responsible for screwing up the Earth's environment by burning actual wood in my firepit. Any pictures demonstrating otherwise are simply high tech simulations.

By the way, does anyone have any ideas on how to get rid of the stuff pictured below? It's everywhere...

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Old 02-17-2012, 09:24 PM   #42
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


I guess you're going to have to haul it off to the dump. Don't forget that leaner. It looks dangerously close to smashing all that hard work.
I love your property
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Old 02-18-2012, 12:26 AM   #43
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


I missed all that I guess. It didn't seem to make much sense to build a fireplace and not burn wood. I am so not worried about the environmental impact of burning firewood in a backyard pit.
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Old 02-18-2012, 05:58 AM   #44
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


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I missed all that I guess. It didn't seem to make much sense to build a fireplace and not burn wood. I am so not worried about the environmental impact of burning firewood in a backyard pit.
Neither am I.

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Old 03-22-2012, 04:54 PM   #45
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Old outdoor fireplace rehab'd to a firepit...


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I hope you use green (i.e. environmentally friendly) fire logs because burning regular wood straight up will create pollution.

see: http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/gree...roundup-135950

Does anyone have a spare fist to thrust straight up into my face?

Great job on your new space bro. It looks beast. The bomb.com . It's sweeter than Christmas morning. It's sweeter than Santa's chimney chow. It rocks not only my face, but every other part of my body off. Right off. It rocks more than a Quikrete factory.

Bk

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