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Old 08-07-2007, 03:57 AM   #16
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Wow. You built like 2/3 of the house yourself. Good job. Very impressive.

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Old 08-07-2007, 07:38 AM   #17
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Very impressive.

A couple of questions if you don't mind:

Approx how much a sq ft did you save by doing it yourself?

Did you spend last winter in the house? How much was the heat bill?

How did the ICF foundation work for you?


I'm considering building something in our farm in Ohio in the next ten years and so I'm trying to gather different ideas now. I'm also leaning towards the ICF basement walls as well as radiant heat. Probably going to go Geothermal heat pump as the soil at the farm has zero rocks, unlike the quarry we live on in NY.

thanks,

Tony
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Old 08-07-2007, 09:48 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by FatAugie View Post
Very impressive.

A couple of questions if you don't mind:

Approx how much a sq ft did you save by doing it yourself?

Did you spend last winter in the house? How much was the heat bill?

How did the ICF foundation work for you?


I'm considering building something in our farm in Ohio in the next ten years and so I'm trying to gather different ideas now. I'm also leaning towards the ICF basement walls as well as radiant heat. Probably going to go Geothermal heat pump as the soil at the farm has zero rocks, unlike the quarry we live on in NY.

thanks,

Tony
Tony, good questions. I'll try to answer.

I'd say I saved about 20-25%. This is based on the GC markup and what other labor I did myself. I estimated this savings to be about $65K/2000 finished squarefeet = $32.50/ft^2

I've been in the house through a winter. The radient is on a dual fuel electric service at about $0.05 kWh. If I recall correctly this was costinga bout $50/month in the coldest months. The main floor is forced air, LP furnace and the 1380 sqft garage has a 75,000 btu Modine Hot Dawg. I keep the garage about 50 F during the winter. The house is kept at 68-70F. I use nearly 1000 gallons of LP a year. The garage foundation is ICF and has R19 walls. House and garage celing are R50 blown fiberglass.

The ICF's were a labor saver since my dad and I did the work. The only difficulty we had as keeping the walls plumb at the center. It was hard to get the adjustable bracing to hold in the sandy soil. I would use them again.

I'm finishing the basment right now and have no problems wiring or hanging rock on the ICF's. I just used a sawsall to cut a notch in the foam, down to the concrete. The rough in passed inspection.
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Old 08-07-2007, 10:01 AM   #19
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Wow! Let me say that this is a real inspiration to me. I'd like to do the exact same thing (Contract out the shell and do the inside work myself) and had been strongly advised against it by a lot of folks, but clearly you've shown that it can be done and you can save a lot of money doing it yourself.
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Old 08-07-2007, 02:30 PM   #20
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Wow! Let me say that this is a real inspiration to me. I'd like to do the exact same thing (Contract out the shell and do the inside work myself) and had been strongly advised against it by a lot of folks, but clearly you've shown that it can be done and you can save a lot of money doing it yourself.

Thanks!

I would not have been able to do unless I had the following:

1. family willing to help - my dad helped me throughout and my wifes family helped when they could, they are 3 hours away.

2. A job that is not physically demanding, good vacation and hours - I'm a mechanical engineer so I sit on my butt most of the day and can get home by 3:30 most days. This actually gave me the time to get it done. The poeple I worked with also were helpful. They knew what I was doing and could help backfill me.

3. Willing to spend a year or more of all spare time working on and managing construction. - Not only did I have to work on it, I had to bid, line up and supervise subs to get it done. Worse yet is dealing with the bank. It wasn't much fun but it could have been way worse. The toughest part may be finding a lender that will let you GC for yourself. Mine let me since I do project management as part of my engineering job.

4. Decent subs. I got lucky in that most of my subs did a good job. The carpenter I used did many houses of people I know, the sheetmetal man and electrician both work at the same plant as I do. There were issues but nothing to write Mike Holmes about.

The key is everything takes twice as long and costs twice as much as you figure.
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Old 08-20-2007, 04:47 PM   #21
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WOW!!

Great Work!!
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Old 08-21-2007, 02:32 PM   #22
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WOW!!

Great Work!!

Thanks



Here are a few more pix from my basement project.

Bulkheaded W8x24 beam in hallway.


Bathroom mudjob, the ceiling to the right will be suspended due to the ductwork.


New 100 amp subpanel in garage, middle panels are dual fuel for electric boiler/AC and off peak for water heater.


Egress pit we built with stonefaced CMU's

Last edited by comp1911; 08-21-2007 at 02:38 PM.
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Old 08-21-2007, 02:58 PM   #23
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Hallway - you can see the unfinished beam and floor trusses in the big room.


Mechanical Room finished with OSB.
Furnace


Water heater, FanTech air exchanger, beer fridge! and my hack plumbing well tank, filters and softener guarded by Officer Cartman.

Last edited by comp1911; 08-21-2007 at 03:00 PM.
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Old 08-21-2007, 03:03 PM   #24
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Bedroom #1 getting ready for rock. I'm setting it up with a laundry hook up in the closet. Plumbing wall and egress window in ICF wall.




Last edited by comp1911; 08-21-2007 at 03:05 PM.
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Old 08-21-2007, 03:21 PM   #25
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Bedroom #2, taped and mudded ready for sanding.




Bedroom #3 starting to tape, Beware of the Pug Dawg!



Last edited by comp1911; 08-21-2007 at 03:26 PM.
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Old 08-23-2007, 09:49 AM   #26
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This is an awsome example how people CAN do it themselves regardless what is told by other people. I commend your work, very nicely done. I don't care for the color schemes you chosen but hey thats a cosmetic preference. I enjoy seeing people completing their own work without having to call in a specialist. Most people today can't even cut their own lawn...soo sad .
badfish740 said this

"Wow! Let me say that this is a real inspiration to me. I'd like to do the exact same thing (Contract out the shell and do the inside work myself) and had been strongly advised against it by a lot of folks, but clearly you've shown that it can be done and you can save a lot of money doing it yourself."

I asked a couple questions over in the electrical forum about some work im doing and their only answer was hire a professional, All they are able to do over there is answer questions not much more than 3ways and changing out outlets. Kinda like going over to the lawn and garden forum and asking what is the best lawnmower to cut my grass with, with the help I got in electrical woudlnt' be surprised if they said "hire a professional" I found my answers elsewhere, so advice is your going to get annoyed sometimes, but keep trying. City Inspectors are a place to start, Internet is a great tool, and SOME home improvement stores has some knowledgable people.
I'm a Licensed contractor and yeh you saved ALOT of money and gained a whole lot of knowledge. It's defintily a no brainer to know that down the road if something happens your not going to need to call in somebody to take care of that outlet replacement, or hanging that new ceiling fan...
Advice to anyone wanting to do it themselves this is proof you can! don't let specialist in electrical/plumbing or any other area tell you that you can't. Just do your research ask questions that your not sure of, be prepared to be insulted and not get your question answered by certain people. Dont give up and try again. Its going to be long haul to do it yourself but in the end you WILL BE satisfied of what you done.
Im sure comp1911 would agree with me on this..

Great job/Great pics
Should be a great inspiration for people who are interested in seeing how a house works.

Kraze.

Last edited by Kraze; 08-23-2007 at 09:51 AM.
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Old 08-23-2007, 11:19 AM   #27
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This is an awsome example how people CAN do it themselves regardless what is told by other people. .........
Kraze.

Thanks Kraze

Just takes a little bit of talent, research (the internet is great!) and a lot of time and money
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Old 08-25-2007, 08:05 PM   #28
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Nice Job!
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Old 08-26-2007, 07:15 PM   #29
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Nice Job!
Thanks! As I finish the basement off, I'll add pics.
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Old 11-30-2007, 01:23 PM   #30
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wow love it

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