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Old 03-04-2012, 02:40 PM   #16
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


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Mr. Dorf Dude, I'm thrilled to see you here. Your thread is legendary and one of the inspirations for my being here posting my own adventure. I'm still working my way through your thread so I haven't gotten to the interior yet. Did you put in an IKEA kitchen? Can't wait to see it!

Sorry for the lack of photos. I agree they really help to beef up the thread, but unfortunately, in keeping with my haphazard building style, I didn't decide to start documenting the reno until about half way through so I only have a few random photos of the beginning phase.

Once I get the posts up to date and start posting live I'll be sure to keep a better record of things. But I assure you, pictures or no pictures, exciting developments are just around the corner!
Yes I've put in an Ikea kitchen twice actually. Modified it for the 2nd install. I'm on the look out for a Nexus Birch door. Size 40cm x 60cm. I'm looking forward to your project. dorf dude...

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Old 03-04-2012, 03:19 PM   #17
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


Sounds nice. I'll have to fast-forward in my reading and take a look.

I splurged a bit and ordered some of their Lidingo covers. Not sure how it will turn out. As you'll soon learn, the plans are still very fluid so I'm not actually sure about much. Not sure about the counter, or the configuration of all the cabinets. The one thing I do know is that there is likely to be some modifications made!

If you're into pushing IKEA products to the max you should check here for inspiration: http://www.ikeahackers.net/
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Old 03-04-2012, 03:23 PM   #18
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


So it's time to stud out my walls. Alas, not too many pictures of this stage I'm afraid...There will be more in future posts, I promise!

You may have noticed from previous posts that my kitchen space is a little on the small side. About 130sq. ft. of small space. This presented certain challenges when trying to figure out the best layout with my future IKEA cabinets. There are different sized cabinets and some flexibility, but ultimately every last inch became dear to me. Without getting into too many details (and actually I still haven't decided on the FINAL layout of all my cabinets ) I decided that I could stud out my first sink wall with 2x4s as planned but could only afford to use 2x2s on my second wall. Not the greatest for insulating, but the decision had to be made, albeit somewhat misguidedly...

Since the existing strapping was spaced more or less 16" on center, I decided to leave them in place so as not to disrupt the masonry (maybe a bad idea - stay tuned) and use them as a quick guide for the new studs. It all went pretty smoothly. I just tacked in a top and bottom plate, then worked my way along cutting studs to a snug fit. The top and bottom plates held everything together, and where needed I screwed through and attached the studs to the strapping, which itself was rather well anchored to the wall.

Here's a look at most of the new framing on the two exterior walls:



This also gives you a glimpse at the extensive demo that was undertaken and completed. It was a real pain cleaning out all the garbage and carrying it in bags downstairs. But finally that's all behind me. Things are starting to come together. Progress is being made. And through it all it's of course important to keep one's sense of style. How do you like the fancy work light?

As I made my way towards the plumbing (just left of the photo) I realised it was now time to remove the old drain and service lines in order to have enough room to finish studding. But remember my plan was to pass the new plumbing through my new wall? Well this is where my planning broke down. I was not ready to build this new plumbing, nor did I have enough time remaining in the day, but I really wanted to remove the old junk so that I could at least be happy that I had finished my studding. Of course I couldn't leave the water off over night as others who live in the house tend to enjoy drinking the stuff and using it to flush their toilets and what not. So I had to cut it all off close to where it emerges from the wall, stuff the drain with an old towel, and solder on caps to the two service lines. (Turns out it was a big waste attaching that new shutoff a few weeks prior ) This was my first time soldering caps...Hooray! Nothing exploded!
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Old 03-04-2012, 03:30 PM   #19
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


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Demolition is now officially - kind of, more or less - over!

The garbage man came by and now I have my front porch back. At the same time, however, I've lost a little space in the garage...



As you can see, I really wasn't joking about collecting all the lath. I guess I felt bad enough with all the other waste I was creating and thought the least I could do was entertain the thought of repurposing some scrap wood. Any thoughts on what to do with it??

Here are some pretty impressive results using recycled lath:

http://goodsfromthehoods.com/
http://designskool.net/lath-goods-by...-ice-cream-co/

My only issue with the second site is their example of an entire wall covered in lathing. Seems a little crazy to me...Tear down an old wall, remove the lath, build a new wall and then cover it with the old lath?? You mean the old lath that is caked in plaster and is probably carcenogenic? The old lath that is extremely incredibly flammable? And that's your entire feature wall in your bedroom?

For those who are wondering, I decided to stop short of ripping out the floor. I thought removing 5 of 6 sides of the room was sufficient and taking out the floor would have added way more work than even I was willing to take on. The tile is in good shape, relatively recent, and the colors are not too atrocious. So it stays.

No more destruction, time for construction!
That stuff would make great fire starter!!
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Old 03-04-2012, 03:41 PM   #20
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


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That stuff would make great fire starter!!
If only I had a fire place...

I think if it's still in my garage by this time next year then I'll start giving it away in bundles as gifts of kindling to those blessed with cottages or fire places or both.
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Old 03-04-2012, 04:36 PM   #21
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


I've been putting it off for some time, destracting myself with demo, studding, brick cleaning, but it's probably about time that I actually settle on some sort of finalized design for the actual kitchen right?? Well...but maybe I could just think about it some more while I rework my plumbing through my new wall. At least I can be content with that right?

Well wait, maybe the sink shouldn't go there anymore. Maybe it should go on the other side. I mean, since I'm redoing the entire plumbing anyway I shouldn't have to restrict myself. Hmm... Maybe I should install a corner sink. I know not everyone is thrilled by the corner sink, but in such a small kitchen I think it tends to make the most efficient use of the counter space. And then it would make the plumbing easier and I wouldn't have to pass it through my studded out wall. But wait, isn't that why I studded it out in the first place?? No. Insulation. Insulation is now the new justification - the sink can now go anywhere! But where? This will impact the configuration of the cabinets and there's really only a few options. Say, I'm changing out the plumbing so maybe it's the right time to consider adding a dishwasher ...Could the existing electrical ever possibly support this idea? Well maybe I could just leave space for a dishwasher and then install it later if and when I was ever able to update the electrical. No no, what am I saying? This is crazy. If I want a dishwasher I need to install it now. Maybe I could get away with using one branch of my multibranch 15amp circuit to power the dishwasher, and then the other branch to feed a run of 2 or 3 receptacles as well as the range hood...but so un code like...what to do?

Ok Ok I need to calm down here. I know. This is what I will do:

I'm going to postpone taking any decision on these matters and engage myself in an entirely unrelated task. I'm going to stud out my third wall to make it one consistent depth. No more akward corner in the middle!
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Old 03-04-2012, 05:48 PM   #22
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


So perhaps I'll spare everyone any further exposure to my frantic thought prosesses. Needless to say, the girlfriend and I can be an indecisive bunch, especially when an entire kitchen is on the line.

Clearly more conrete decisions needed to be made with regards to the cabinet layout but more important was what to do about the very inadequate electrical. There was a great deal of debate, head shaking, hand wringing, and flip flopping over the next few weeks. Finally, at long last, decisions were reached. Time for action!

I'll dispense with the numerous scenarios we thought up and various factors that were at play and just cut to the chase. (If you really want to know then you can ask me and I'll tell you later)

Disclaimer: This project is about to veer temporarily away from a path of true, 100% DIY activity. I apologize.

Here's how it went down:

I called my friendly neighbourhood electrician. I told him what I needed and we agreed that I could act as helper to cut down on costs. So let's call this the DIWAP - Do IT With A Professional (no snickering please) - phase of my project.

The oven in my old kitchen was wired on some 8-3 that found itself to the basement panel box via a 1 inch PVC conduit strapped to the outside of my house. Here's what it looks like:



Wire leaves the kitchen and enters the 1" PVC conduit




It journeys along the side of the house and turns down towards the basement




Here it enters the house alongside the main 100amp service to the main panel box in the basement



So the first step was to pop open the two access panels at either end of the PVC conduit, disconnect from the main panel, and rip out this very long run of wire. The hardest part was getting some wiggle room at first, but once there was a bit of wire to hold onto it came out rather smoothly. We pulled it out from the top end, attaching a fish tape to the bottom. And hey, we're recycling! Part of this wire will go inside the new kitchen to wire the new stove connection.

The second step was much trickier, the goal being to swap in some beefier 6-3 rated for a 60amp circuit. We left about 15 extra feet in the kitchen, attached the leading edge to the fish tape that was now stretched through the entire conduit, and then we shoved it on its way back down the long dark hole. The added thickness made it much harder to conjole and bend tightly as it came out of the wall and into the PVC conduit but we managed in the end. The trusty professional also dabbed a little washing up liquid on the tip of the wire to help it in its long slide over and down to the basement and, before we know it, a few hours later and one small hole in the basement ceiling and it's home free!

Phase one complete!

Last edited by demandrew; 03-04-2012 at 09:23 PM.
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Old 03-04-2012, 09:57 PM   #23
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


Any ideas where I'm going with this?

It's now time for phase 2: Rewire the entire kitchen as best we can to code, wiring from a new sub-panel in the kitchen that gets powered from the mighty 6-3 cable we just sent down to the basement.

Unfortunately I have no pictures of the process, so all I can show you is the sweet, beautiful, magnificent finished product (can you tell I hated my old electrical?). Do feel free though to ask about any of the undocumented process involved and I'll do my best to fill you in.

Now let me show you around the kitchen:



First, the big ol wire enters the kitchen (just out of view to the bottom left). It climbs up the wall then runs along and across the ceiling to somewhere very special...




Look, in all its majesty as it traverses the ceiling joists and leads down the adjacent wall! But where is it going in such a hurry? And who are all of its friends?










I really hope someone out there is as excited about this as I am...










Wait for it...










BABOOM!!



What a glorious, glorious site to behold! I could just look at it for hours...

Look at all the wires! And the colors! And the - ok ok, I'm back.

The wires exiting at the left wrap around the door to a light switch. One wire powers the switch and connects to another wire that travels back along the wall to power a second switch that in turn will light some under cabinet lights. The third wire returns from the switch, climbs into the ceiling, and powers the main ceiling light.

Here's the real bonus: I was able to remove the bathroom from that dreaded #5 circuit and place the plugs, lights, and washing machine onto their own individual circuits. That's what those wires are that are dropping down from the darkened space beyond the lower ceiling joist. I was also able to remove the fridge and ceiling light from that foolish #5 circuit. Hooray!

The rest of the wires head to the right. Let's see where they go!



Here they are behind that third wall that I evened out.

The extension cord is borrowing some energy from what will become the fridge outlet, and that loose cable on the bottom is for the dishwasher. You can also see a double gang box housing the first of three counter-top plugs as well as the switch for the under-cabinet lights (which at the moment is powering my funky wall light - so that I could be confident I wired it correctly)

This is where the knob and tube used to dominate, but thankfully it has now been reduced to a ghost of its former self. Can you see that junction box opposite the fridge plug?

Here it is up close:



Unfortunately, I wasn't able to totally remove the knob and tube, so for now it will live in this box behind the fridge. The old setup had the knob and tube distributed into a bunch of junctions. I had hoped that the previous junctions took power into the bathroom and from there further to the bedroom and hallway in a long chain. In this case I could have bypassed the knob and tube with a new wire from my new sub-panel, tied into the initial junction box, and effectively re-wired the top floor without the need for ripping into the walls and ceilings. The circuit would be a bit loaded up, but still a vast improvement over the knob and tube. Unfortunately, this knob and tube only controlled the kitchen and bathroom. These elements have now been wired to the new sub-panel as described above - which is GREAT - but somewhere further below there is an as yet undetected branch that distributes power seperately to the hallway and bedroom. One day I will find it. But not now.

That other wire sharing space in the junction box is the remnants of that multi-branch circuit that originally powered the rest of the old kitchen. I will probably end up removing it completely, but it is still connected to the main panel in the basement so for now it lives in the box as well so I know to keep track of it when the walls go up!

Here's where it originally pops out of the deep abyss in my wall/floor:



OK. Onward we go.

The remaining wires continue their journey around the kitchen to this wall:



Here there are two more counter-top receptacles, the stove, a loose cable for the range hood and then one last lone wire that continues around to the last wall to power two additional receptacles. For the moment please disregard the vent...I'll be getting to that shortly...

What a great day it was when we flipped the switch in the basement and delivered fresh, clean, uninterrupted energy to the new kitchen! A magical day indeed.

It's been a long post I know, but I'd just like to end things off with one final up-close look at the new sub-panel.



A thing of beauty...
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Old 03-06-2012, 08:05 PM   #24
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


The more observant out there might have spotted something missing in my last post, as though a few wires in my photos were not totally accounted for...Well I admit, I may not have told the whole story...

If you remember my mention of the dreaded circuit #5 you'll remember how it disgusted me. You'll also remember that bundled up in that mess was the power to my garage. Now, I'm sure everyone can understand how this just wouldn't do - this is the DIY chatroom after all, where the thought of an underpowered garage, a.k.a my future workshop/man-den, should make us all shudder.

Now I'm not saying that the whole motivation for installing a sub-panel in the kitchen was to allow for an easy and simultaneous upgrade of the garage's electrics - although I can see how some could make that confusion... Whatever the case may be - and who can really unravel with precision the genuine and precise origins of our motives anyway - it is a very happy consequence of updating the kitchen that I now have an opportunity to send a fresh line to the garage. Of course there are always restrictions. Sure, I would like to drop down a fat 100amp sub to allow for, you know, 20 different power tools with a 50 gallon tank all stacked on top of a lift with welders, mini-lifts for the welders, a sauna, three fridges, a fridge inside the sauna, a movie theatre, and so on...but I only have a 60amp panel in my kitchen so I'm a little limited.

So if we look again we can now discover the great surprise that I left out of my last post:



There it is coming in on the left, yet to be hooked into the panel. I reused some of that long oven wire from the PVC conduit and will attach it to a 40amp breaker. Alas, 40amps is all I will have...But this is still a great improvement over a measly 20amp circuit spread across almost half of the house! So I brought it around the room, more or less following the same path as the main 60amp line, and had it end in a junction box behind the oven. From here I hooked up a new run of wire of the same gauge but rated for the outdoors. This lucky fellow is now headed straight through the wall and will soon be introduced to its new home in the garage.

Here's the wire heading off into the big bad world:




And here's the implement of destruction that helped me blast through my exterior wall like butter:




It was a little worrying at first, but the 3/4" bit cut through in a jiffy with little signs of resistance. It was so easy in fact it almost makes me want to look for other reasons to break through my wall...(a hint of things to come perhaps??)
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Old 03-06-2012, 10:53 PM   #25
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


Interesting thread so far. Keep up the good work. Is there a plan to incorporate that brick wall, or even a portion of it into your new kitchen? That could look really sharp. It is a good idea to tear out the old walls and build new flat walls when renovating a kitchen. I wish I had gone the extra expense to tear out the third wall of my kitchen.

The free-standing Ikea cabinets are independant of the counter tops which I guess are built on a top of a seperate frame. You could then just remove your old cabinets and replace them with new without tearing out the counter tops.

I hired a lot done with mine On to the Kitchen mostly because my wife wanted it back up and functional in a hurry. I did add new circuits for the microwave, refrigerator, outside and more counter recepticles. It's nice to be able to run the microwave and toaster at the same time.

Keep up the good work and don't forget to take pictures, even if you don't upload them right away at least you have them.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:05 AM   #26
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


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Interesting thread so far. Keep up the good work. Is there a plan to incorporate that brick wall, or even a portion of it into your new kitchen? That could look really sharp. It is a good idea to tear out the old walls and build new flat walls when renovating a kitchen. I wish I had gone the extra expense to tear out the third wall of my kitchen.

The free-standing Ikea cabinets are independant of the counter tops which I guess are built on a top of a seperate frame. You could then just remove your old cabinets and replace them with new without tearing out the counter tops.

I hired a lot done with mine On to the Kitchen mostly because my wife wanted it back up and functional in a hurry. I did add new circuits for the microwave, refrigerator, outside and more counter recepticles. It's nice to be able to run the microwave and toaster at the same time.

Keep up the good work and don't forget to take pictures, even if you don't upload them right away at least you have them.
Welcome Jim! I'm glad you're following along with interest!

Part of the plan is to somehow incorporate the exposed brick wall into the final kitchen. I'm a sucker for exposed brick so I just couldn't turn down the opportunity. That said, I have very little idea of the work that lies ahead in restoring the wall. I'm not really sure how I will transition the the drywall into the brick, and there's a large, almost 2" space between the brick wall and the original flooring...I'm gonna have to find some thick baseboard solution to bridge this gap...What are your thoughts? Expose the entire wall or just "feature" the protruding chimney section? I will make sure to include a lot of pictures of this stage. It will be coming up very soon...

Nice work on your kitchen! It's a shame you couldn't rescue the original floor but the new one you put in looks pretty sweet. Although I did kinda like the look of your old pantry . I also like your idea of the temporary countertop. Might have to be something to consider. Actually, I have no idea yet what my countertop is going to be so I'm almost certainly going to have to use a temporary to keep "everyone else" happy...The pressure is mounting though. We've been living too long without a kitchen and we're visiting Vancouver in under a month. It would really be nice to return to a new kitchen!

-andrew
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:27 AM   #27
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


Electrical work is now all complete so I'm just about ready to tackle the insulation. But then I think to myself: "Wouldn't it be nice to install an over the range microwave? I mean, I already have the dedicated line..."

So another surprise twist emerges. At the time I didn't think it would be too big of a deal - just a small change in the surrounding cabinets. But then I started asking around and I soon realized how inadequate the old venting was for a new extractor fan microwave. See here for the DIY chatroom discussion: Venting an oven range microwave

This is my old, grimey vent:




As you can see it's only a measly 4 inches. Good enough? maybe.

At first I thought of doing this:




and then this:



But ongoing discussion presuaded me otherwise. There was also another factor at work...

You see, I never really thought things through fully when purchasing my new oven. I was won over by the "slide in" so that's what I got. But it never occurred to me that the new oven would need extra space on the side that had previously butted up against the wall. It needs some counter on either side of course to slide into. So the oven has to move over to the left, throwing off the alignment with the above vent... So now my vent is not only too small but it's also in the wrong place!

So the hole needs to be enlarged...it should also be moved slightly. So what the heck, since I'm disrupting the wall, let's just go all the way and fit in a new 3 1/4" x 10" microwave vent! That's right! Time to fit a big rectangle into a small round hole... Am I up to the challenge??

To be continued...
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:34 AM   #28
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick








~~## **INTERMISSION** ##~~







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Old 03-07-2012, 11:45 AM   #29
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


And we're back. We are now fully up to date and back in the present! Thank you for coming along for the ride. Part II promises all sorts of excitement and I shall not waste any time. Things are about to get real.

I've been waiting for the weather to improve over the last few days, which has given me the time not only to catch everyone up in the forum but most importantly to mentally prepare for the task that now awaits. Much of what I am about to attempt today will be a first for me. I know how to climb a ladder, but that's about it.

With any luck, after the day is through, I will have learned the following new skills:
  • How to mix mortar
  • How to operate an angle grinder
  • How to remove and replace a brick
  • How to repoint brick
  • How to drill through and anchor things to brick
Wish me luck!
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Old 03-12-2012, 08:04 AM   #30
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My full kitchen remodel! Lots of improvisation mixed with IKEA and exposed brick


After some brief delays, I'm happy to report that I did indeed learn all of the skills I had hoped and more. I promised lots of photos so get ready. Here's how it all went down:

After ripping out the old vent pipe I was left with this nice, bright, slightly-bigger-than 4 inch hole:



My plan is to remove and replace that brick in the bottom left corner, place some half bricks above it, closing off most of the old round hole, and then remove space over on the top right side for the new rectangular vent.

Oh yeah, all of the exterior work (including treacherous exterior photography) was executed high up on this steep ladder:


So without delay, I'm up the ladder to acquaint myself with my new angle grinder. Turns out being perched atop a very tall and steep ladder were not the best conditions for trying out a new, powerful, and intimidating tool such as the angle grinder. But I managed to make a few cuts and I suppose it proved helpful. I quickly packed it away and opted instead for some drilling and some light hammer and chiseling until that stubborn first brick was gone.





This first stage took a lot longer than I expected, in large part because of how intense the working conditions were. I'm used to being up on ladders, but the steepness of this pitch made for a prety awkward and often worrying situation. Then the wind started picking up and things got even more dramatic. It was around this time that I returned from inside my house to see my ladder, fully extended, crashing down to the ground after a huge gust of wind! Well, good thing I already got that first brick out. No turning back now. Let's see what work I can do from the inside. Away from ladders...

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