Kitchen Remodel - Project Showcase - Page 11 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Repair > Project Showcase

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-01-2012, 03:57 PM   #151
Member
 
Ironlight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 701
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Kitchen remodel


Not sure what you mean by border...is this something on the wall? A wallpaper border?

As far as your counter top goes, consider carefully how you're going to finish it. If you stain it you're going to need to seal it and then topcoat it with a very durable material like catalyzed polyurethane. That will be somewhat scratch resistant, but you'll need to be careful to not cut on it at all. It's not food safe either, I'm pretty sure.

If I were you I would leave it unstained and instead give it like 5 coats of mineral oil. That will darken it up, will be food safe, and scratches won't show and can be easily buffed out if they do. You'll need to re-oil it pretty regularly, like ever few months.

All this said I don't really know much about wood countertops in kitchens. I guess it all comes down to how you expect to use them and how durable they need to be.

Advertisement

Ironlight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 04:13 PM   #152
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: British Columbia Canada
Posts: 460
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Kitchen remodel


Ironlight....You are correct on all areas of the countertop. As a previous restauranteur I can only add that to maintain them you should regularly scrub them with an abrasive scouring pad and dutch cleanser type cleaner. Rinse thoroughly and then apply white vinegar, let dry and you are 100% sanitized. For appearance you can then apply food grade mineral oil. This is the procedure I used for many years and it more than satisfied all the health inspectors, we also NEVER had a bacterial problem. I use this procedure at my own home as I have maple butcher block counter tops myself. I chose maple as it has a natural antibacterial in it as apposed to this new white plastic crap which only provides a place for bacteria to grow.
fixrite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2012, 09:20 PM   #153
wannabe carpenter
 
leiona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: west virginia
Posts: 152
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Kitchen remodel


I want to keep the countertops natural but they're so light..i dont like that. i dont know what to do, so many are stained on the internet ...and the lady who sold me the countertops said she stained hers dark and poly'd them 6 years ago. she still likes them. i dont plan on cutting on them. got cutting blocks for that. Plus i got kids the "kool aid" age and stains WILL happen.

still at a loss as to what to do about this glue residue from the backsplash i ripped off the wall.
BTW the border i speak of is wallpaper border and it is REALLY on there. im gonna plaster over it with joint compound and blend it in, who cares right? its only me i got to impress!!

heres the current progress with temporary countertops..
Attached Thumbnails
Kitchen remodel-kitchen-mar2.jpg  
__________________
It's a new dawn, it's a new day, it's a new kitchen for me!

Last edited by leiona; 03-03-2012 at 09:36 PM.
leiona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 12:19 PM   #154
wannabe carpenter
 
leiona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: west virginia
Posts: 152
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Kitchen remodel


Ok folks, that is if you are still out there...I know this renno is boring as five but its about to take off again here today.
I read and read a thousand articles on finishing these countertops in a dark stain or finish and the best i can come up with is strongly brewed coffee to stain them. it is food safe and can be mineral oiled or varnished with waterlox. After trying to visualize extremely light colored countertops in my kitchen and the colors i would would pick to coordinate with them, i decided i definetly dont like light color counters, and i just know that in this house, light countertops will look bad really quick.
the countertops are getting cut to size today and i will begin distressing them and staining them today as well. i cant wait to see what they look like with a coffee stain on them! i may skip the distressing but i think that if i distress them that any dents or marks i make on them in the future will blend better if they are already distressed.

Let me know what you think or if anyone has ever stained anything with coffee. thanks guys!
__________________
It's a new dawn, it's a new day, it's a new kitchen for me!
leiona is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to leiona For This Useful Post:
shumakerscott (03-04-2012)
Old 03-04-2012, 02:35 PM   #155
Ole Wood Worker

 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lookout Valley, Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 7,843
Rewards Points: 2,790
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Kitchen remodel


You may want to give some stains a try on the backside of the counter tops, once it is stained there is not a lot you can do from that point. Since you are not going to be cutting on the counter tops my advise would be to put a durable finish on them.

I have a butcher block cutting board that I made a year or so ago, may have been two years ago, but anyway it does not look good now that it has had some use. I finished it with mineral oil and reoiled but it still looks bad. I can't speak for you, I can only speak for me, if those were my tops I would stain them the way I wanted to and finish with a semi gloss Poly. Since you aren't cutting on them there shouldn't be any chips of poly and stain to get in your food.

I do agree that you should go ahead and distress them now, so it won't show when they do get dented. Just a word of advise on distressing, don't make holes in the top when distressing, food, salt flour and stuff will get in them and it is hard to get out. Do distress them before staining as you may have to restain afterwards and there is a chance you would have to resand after distressing.

I use a chain, old keys on a chain, hammer and anything else I can get hold of. I have even shot a couple of things with a shot gun and a pistol with rat shot. I did a table like that and it turned out good. After I had shot it and beat the stew out of it, I stained it, let it dry and sanded the table back down to raw wood with only the dents and holes stained, it looked pretty good. If you shoot something like that, be sure to use bird shot and stand a long way back, or you will blow it all to pieces. Just ask me how I know.The biiiig holes are hard to patch.

Oh and sand the edges so they look worn in places.
__________________
New members: Please consider adding your location to your profile.

If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

Jim
BigJim is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 05:24 PM   #156
wannabe carpenter
 
leiona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: west virginia
Posts: 152
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Kitchen remodel


Jim thanx so much for that man, i was floundering here!
One question..with the poly, even though i wont be cutting on them, will dents be obvious say a heavy pot was dropped on them or something, and if it did dent could i just fill the dent with poly in a medicine dropper or something to flatten the dent back out? will the distress marks flatten out with the poly or will the poly stay true to the form? in other words will i have poly'd divots
...and should i poly all of it like the underside and where the edges meet as well? I was nervous about doing an oil finish because i am going to put a drop in sink in the counter so i hate for it to warp or something there.

BTW my uncle said laquer thinner would work on the glue residue on my walls, what do you think of that?

so here the counters are cut and dry fitted..
Attached Thumbnails
Kitchen remodel-countertops-unstained.jpg  
__________________
It's a new dawn, it's a new day, it's a new kitchen for me!

Last edited by leiona; 03-04-2012 at 05:36 PM.
leiona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 05:34 PM   #157
wannabe carpenter
 
leiona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: west virginia
Posts: 152
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Kitchen remodel


also, what should i do about this completely unavoidable gap that is here? wood putty or filler..or do you think when i glue and screw them together they'll be ok? maybe i should put the last coat of poly on after they are together and installed, then that will fill in that gap? what do ya think?

like you all said, my walls were not square so we got it as perfect as we could..my uncle helped me
Attached Thumbnails
Kitchen remodel-counter-gap.jpg  
__________________
It's a new dawn, it's a new day, it's a new kitchen for me!
leiona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 05:39 PM   #158
Newbie
 
JBosarge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 12
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Kitchen remodel


I am new to the group and up until now I have just spent my time learning from all the post. Never commented or asked a question. But saw pic of counters and had to post a comment. I must say I absolutely love those counters! Beautiful! Can't wait to see them once they are finished. Beautiful work!
JBosarge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 05:41 PM   #159
wannabe carpenter
 
leiona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: west virginia
Posts: 152
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Kitchen remodel


fixrite, could you possibly put a pic of your counter up so i can see how dark it got for you?
__________________
It's a new dawn, it's a new day, it's a new kitchen for me!
leiona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 05:42 PM   #160
Member
 
Ironlight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 701
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Kitchen remodel


DEFINITELY experiment with the staining on the undersides. You never really know how something is going to turn out until you've tried it and as mentioned stain is not something you can "undo".

The one issue that I imagine with coffee is penetration. Commercial stain is engineered, from the grinding of the particulate to the formulation of the spirits, to penetrate into wood pores. I have no idea how coffee is going to behave in that regard.

If you're going to seal it with poly then I don't think it really matters what you use for the stain, as far as the counters being food safe is concerned. the Poly will seal it. For that reason you might want to visit your hardware store and look at a stain chart and buy a sample of a color that looks like what you are after and try it next to the coffee and see how both perform.

I would definitely stain and finish these before you install them. You'll get much better fit and finish. The poly will flow and follow the form of the divits. You don't want the poly to build up in them...it's a coating not a filler and it could fail if it's too thick in areas.

Regarding the adhesive, you really need to scrape it off, then skim the wallboard. In fact that is going to be less work than trying to skim over the adhesive and get an acceptable surface. Are you going to install a backsplash? If so then you don't want to be putting it up on top of compound on top of adhesive on top of drywall. Compound is not designed to adhere to old adhesive and you'll risk failure down the road.

I dunno what I'd do about that gap. I'd probably run a bead of silicone caulk between the two pieces before installation, fasten them in place, then clean up the joint. You want it to be flexible and smooth with the surface and to keep dirt out. Another option is epoxy since you can color it and it will make a hard joint. Looking at it again, I'd probably sand and subtly shape the butt end of one piece to get a tight fit all along the seam. That's your best approach.

Last edited by Ironlight; 03-04-2012 at 05:50 PM.
Ironlight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 05:43 PM   #161
wannabe carpenter
 
leiona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: west virginia
Posts: 152
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Kitchen remodel


Quote:
Originally Posted by JBosarge View Post
I am new to the group and up until now I have just spent my time learning from all the post. Never commented or asked a question. But saw pic of counters and had to post a comment. I must say I absolutely love those counters! Beautiful! Can't wait to see them once they are finished. Beautiful work!
thank you so much! i love them too. from lumber liquidators. Dont worry I will post pics every step of the way here.
__________________
It's a new dawn, it's a new day, it's a new kitchen for me!
leiona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 05:50 PM   #162
wannabe carpenter
 
leiona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: west virginia
Posts: 152
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Kitchen remodel


Ironlight thanks for the info there. While i am torn between the mineral oil finish and the poly, the only reason i was gonna use coffee to stain was so i could use the mineral oil, but still darken them up first. I figured the coffee stain would be easy to do over and over if i should happen to need to sand them down, or sand a kool-aid stain out .
I think if i poly I will go with a commercial stain so i can get exactly what i want color-wise.
I dont want to cut on the counters, and food safety is a concern, but not my main one lol, but i would like to have the option of sanding and refinishing them if i want later you know? thats why I'm torn between poly and mineral oil.
__________________
It's a new dawn, it's a new day, it's a new kitchen for me!
leiona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 07:13 PM   #163
wannabe carpenter
 
leiona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: west virginia
Posts: 152
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Kitchen remodel


ok heres the first test...coffee stain pic 1 with coffee sitting on it, pic 2 with it wiped off after 15 min..
Attached Images
   
__________________
It's a new dawn, it's a new day, it's a new kitchen for me!
leiona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 08:09 PM   #164
Member
 
Ironlight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 701
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Kitchen remodel


Ah OK I overlooked the part about still sealing with mineral oil. In that case I guess coffee makes sense.

If you want it darker, try grinding the coffee to dust and making it strong. The finer you grind it, the more of it will penetrate I'm going to wager. Looks like you're on the right track if you can get it darker.
Ironlight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 09:09 PM   #165
Ole Wood Worker

 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lookout Valley, Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 7,843
Rewards Points: 2,790
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Kitchen remodel


Leiona, Ironlight is right on. You can not build up the dents with poly as the surface will dry and seal it off and the poly below the surface will stay uncured and wet. Those are great looking tops. After seeing a picture of them I would leave them undented, but that is just me.

If you were to drop a heavy pot on them there is a very good chance that it would dent the top, but Maple is hard as the dickens, chances are the poly would be cracked if a hard blow from the edge of a sharp cornered pan or pot hit it. You will for sure want to make some wooden trivets to set hot pots on, that would really mess the top up.

The gap, if I were doing it I would scribe the butt end and sand it to fit the other top. With the sanders you have would be a pretty time consuming deal. I think Ironlight has the better idea here.

One thought with sealing, when you cut the sink cutout be sure to seal the edges and under the edges, you sure don't want water to get to the top. You want to seal the edges of the rim of the sink also, that will help keep water from going under the sink where it could ruin the top after a while and you don't want mold either. Another place I would seal under the top would be above the dishwasher, sometimes steam can escape and that is not good on wood.

I would stay away from using lacquer thinner on that glue, it will really get to you inside a home and make the biggest mess you ever saw. It will only soften the glue a little at a time and that is not what you want. There is really only two ways I know of to take care of the glue, scrape it off, which will usually mess the sheet rock up and the second would be to cut the sheet rock, pull it off and replace it.

It really isn't that hard to do, then you wouldn't have to worry about it. It you plan to install ceramic, glass tiles or such you could replace the sheet rock with cement board or hardie backer or some other backer. What ever you do, once the tops have dried and installed cover them with heavy card board and paper so they don't get damaged. If you are going to install a back splash that has to do with any liquid at all, be sure to us plastic to cover the top.

Advertisement

__________________
New members: Please consider adding your location to your profile.

If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

Jim
BigJim is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kitchen Remodel ws450r Kitchen & Bath Remodeling 5 03-15-2012 12:14 AM
Kitchen remodel and venting joeh Plumbing 5 12-17-2011 07:38 PM
Unintended kitchen remodel Itsdanf Project Showcase 191 06-14-2010 12:23 PM
Kitchen remodel; ductwork pinkertonpv HVAC 3 02-18-2009 04:03 PM
Kitchen remodel, sink drain rework pinkertonpv Plumbing 3 02-18-2009 11:06 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts