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Old 02-22-2011, 08:49 PM   #16
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On to the kitchen


It took this combination of available tools to cut the old laminate countertop. The circular saw cut most of it. My son's dremel with a small cutting wheel worked best on the laminate in the place where the saw couldn't reach. I switched to the dremel when it became apparent that the rotozip bits couldn't stand up to the laminate. The rotozip made the deeper cuts beyond the laminate.
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Old 02-23-2011, 04:42 AM   #17
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If you haven't added a Sawsall to your tool pile----put that high on the list for your next Fathers Day!
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Old 02-23-2011, 07:35 AM   #18
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If you haven't added a Sawsall to your tool pile----put that high on the list for your next Fathers Day!
I actually have a nice Dewalt. I just didn't want to cut that deep. The old cabinets have been disappearing off my curb so I've trying to save them for someone else's reuse. For all I really know they are using them for landfill but I've done my part to recycle. But yeah, a sawsall would have made shorter work of it.
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Old 02-24-2011, 08:23 AM   #19
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On to the kitchen


Nice!

Looking forward to more progress.
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Old 02-24-2011, 08:41 PM   #20
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I actually have a nice Dewalt. I just didn't want to cut that deep. .

You can make shallow--well controlled cut with your Sawsall --by butting the blade up side down---try that some time.
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Old 02-24-2011, 09:44 PM   #21
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Good tip Mike. I met the guy who has been taking the cabinets off the curb. It turns out he doesn't care what condition it's in. The guy is deaf so communication was a little difficult. He probably is using them as landfill.

The contractors got the closet and wall torn out, the new door installed but not trimmed out yet. And the door walled in. They also took off the old concrete and mesh from the inner wall and are going to replace that with regular drywall. All in all a pretty productive first day. I've been working on new wiring. I took pictures but too tired to post them.
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Old 02-25-2011, 08:49 AM   #22
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OK, at the risk of sounding like an idiot I'm going to ask anyway. When you say someone is "using it for landfill" - what exactly does that mean? Does it mean they have a hole they need to fill or they are dropping it off in exchange for money somewhere?
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Old 02-26-2011, 12:25 PM   #23
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OK, at the risk of sounding like an idiot I'm going to ask anyway. When you say someone is "using it for landfill" - what exactly does that mean? Does it mean they have a hole they need to fill or they are dropping it off in exchange for money somewhere?
Yes, generally a hole or some hillside lot where they are trying to increase their level lot size.
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Old 02-26-2011, 12:43 PM   #24
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The day before the hired work started, my son and I pulled a 12 guage up to an existing recepticle where there had been an old and presumably 14 guage since it was served by a 15 amp breaker.

The plan there is to rewire two existing outlets to make them 20 amp. I have not decided whether or not I need a GFCI breaker there. One is on the wall near the floor and the other is to the right of my second run of cabinets and countertop. It will most likely be used to power small appliances on that counter so a GFCI is probably a good idea.

I was hoping that we could just pull the old wire through with the fish tape connected. Of course it was stapled requiring some hammering. There is 1-1 1/2 inches of a concrete substance (not plaster) on a steel mesh in my outer walls. At the contractor's suggestion, we decided to pull this all off the back wall of the kitchen and replace it with drywall. This made sense since we are already expanding a window opening for an new 48" door and sidelight and removing the existing door. It will also give us better acces to run new wiring. The other wall will be left as is.
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Old 02-26-2011, 01:07 PM   #25
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Day demolition pictures in no particular order. Once the outer siding was removed you can see this wall is made of. I think I have described it here previously. There are two courses of cinderblock, a 10X7 beam which they attached the original house structure to. This was needed to raise the height of the first floor.

Judging by the cross section,. we believe they then built an second wall inside of the original wall consisting of 3/4 inch tongue and groove with framing members sandwiched in between presumably to make the wall flush floor to ceiling inside.

As you can imagine this unique wall anatomy has added challenges to this renovation project. For instance, In order to bore a hole thtilgh the wall to run romex up from the basement, I need to drill at a slight angle outward from the floor down then measure from a landmark (I used the old copper sink drain) and bore up and an angle from the basement untill that hole met the first one in the middle. Then I had to put a little bend on my 12/2 romex to get it up through those two holes. This is not unlike what we do in medical imaging with vascular catheters. It is not a simple straight drill through a sill plate.
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Old 02-26-2011, 02:22 PM   #26
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Here are some inside demo pics. Closet and wall are gone. The concrete/stucco and mesh came off the back wall.

We discovered there were no headers in the door or window. Apparently, the house is balloon framed, it was probably one story once and made into two. According to the contractor, headers were not necessary because the load is carried all the way up to the roof. They held up that way for many years so it must be the case. The new door is not headed either and if it were, I would have not room for a standard door. I just hope they are right about the headers.

We also discovered that there was no support under that structural beam that runs right above my stove except for the concrete innwer walls. That was remedied with three stacked 2x6's that carry the load down to the large beam and CB foundation.

The new load bearing members do not leave room for my microwave to be vented straight out the back so will have to vent out the top, make a right trun in the cabinet above then out the wall. It would be easier to recirculate through the charcloal filter but I've heard that is not nearly as efficient at clearing smoke. It's either lose the cabinet space and have proper ventillation or recirculate and save cabinet space.

The new door was roughed in and the old openings for the door and 9 inch wall vent were closed in by the end of the first day.
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Old 02-26-2011, 02:48 PM   #27
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On to the kitchen


And a few more day one pictures.
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Old 02-26-2011, 03:46 PM   #28
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This is what we found when we opened up the corner soffit that gave us additional challenges in planning the cabinets.

I knew the soil pipe was in there. But, also found heat pipes for the upstairs registers on that side of the house. Thes are the copper ones. Two non-functioning iron pipes and an electrical cable.
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Old 02-26-2011, 04:19 PM   #29
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We left off day one with the contractor asking me if I wanted to add a new ceiling to the contract. I had already added the inner wall tear off so he told me to think about it overnight. I wasn't planning to replace the ceiling at this time but it was tempting to have it done. We do want to replace the current lights with can lights which would have been done with the ceiling replacement.

My wife and I discussed it and decided that it was more than we wanted to do at this time. I am going to be tearing down the ceiling to access the bathroom plumbing when I renovate that in the near future so it would have been a waste. There is nothing I can pay the contractor to do that I can't do myself as far as ceiling work and new lights is concerned. I have already replaced part of that ceiling anyway. I told them to just patch it up where they removed walls and trim as necessary which is included in the contract.

The cabinets are going up quicker that originally estimated but there was considerable rewiring that had to be done and old wires replaced with new ones. They helped me out quite a bit with the electrical so we just traded that additional labor for the cabinet labor we didn't need.

There was a double switch on the old wall. One controlled the kitchen and one controlled the dining room light. There was a wire coming out of that switch box that went up to two recepticles in my son's room. Those recepticles are now on their own circuit.

The staircase switch was moved to an adjacent wall. The switch by the back entry door will turn on the undercabinet lights. A single switch will control both the kitchen and dining room overhead lights. There will be lights available from either entrance to the kitchen. A three-way to control the ceiling lights from both sides would have been preferable but not feasable without tearing into the ceiling. It was a good compromise.

They got the first run of cabinets installed, electrical wires added and reworked, the new drywall up and then plumbing reworked for the new sink but did not get the sink. The plan is to use the old sink until the new one comesw with the countertops. They are running a little behind at this point so it may be 5 days after all. We are without a sink for the weekend but we don't really want to try and prepare food in that area yet.

In the meantime, we are eating in the living room with disposable dinnerware and drinking bottled water and having dinner at my inlaws.
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Last edited by Jim F; 02-26-2011 at 06:08 PM.
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Old 02-26-2011, 06:21 PM   #30
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These are for the undercabinet lights, a recepticle which will also feed an outdoor recepticle which I don't currently have, and the switch for the undercabinet lights. The two supply wires I have for undercabinet lighting didn't come out exactly where I wanted them.

The one on the left is close, but the one on the right is in more of a wall recepticle position so I am thinking abouit just putting in a regular recepticle there to plug in the lights and an undermount recepticle on the left side. It may even be possible to rework that one through the corner soffit to get it actually under the first cabinet of that run.
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