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Old 01-14-2011, 05:47 AM   #16
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Before you close up the ceiling, I'd run any network cables or coax cables to the upper floors that you might need now or later.

I say this because I just finished wiring my house, and cutting a thousand holes in the wall (well really just 5) because of fire blocking sucks a whole lot.

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Old 01-14-2011, 08:10 PM   #17
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It does look like you are missing the X bridging. It helps to keep the floor joists straight and transfers the weight to the other joists.
You may want to float the floor on some PSI rated styrofoam to keep it warm in the winter.
Will you be drywalling it and how are you going to run the power to get the outlets up to code? You may still need a stud wall. If your going to board it check out the Wallboarder's Buddy it may make your life easier. It may also be worth it to invest in a spiral saw to cut all the outlets.
Yer to far away for me to come and help you. Good luck. It looks like it will make a nice room.
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Old 01-14-2011, 10:13 PM   #18
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What is your plan for the rim joist area?
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Old 01-15-2011, 09:42 AM   #19
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Quote:
Before you close up the ceiling, I'd run any network cables or coax cables to the upper floors that you might need now or later.

I say this because I just finished wiring my house, and cutting a thousand holes in the wall (well really just 5) because of fire blocking sucks a whole lot.
Oatlord - I have started that process already. Running CAT6 and RG6 to all habitable rooms and there are a few rooms that need additional romex for some new lights I am putting upstairs.

Quote:
It does look like you are missing the X bridging. It helps to keep the floor joists straight and transfers the weight to the other joists.
You may want to float the floor on some PSI rated styrofoam to keep it warm in the winter.
Will you be drywalling it and how are you going to run the power to get the outlets up to code? You may still need a stud wall. If your going to board it check out the Wallboarder's Buddy it may make your life easier. It may also be worth it to invest in a spiral saw to cut all the outlets.
Yer to far away for me to come and help you. Good luck. It looks like it will make a nice room.
masterofall - I was guess the builder wanted to save money. I will see what the inspector has to say about it during my first inspection. I still haven't decided on the floor yet. I was planning on putting down some dimpled Platon (or the like) and then either float the floor on that or sandwich some foam between the dimples and the top layer. As for the wall...yes I am going to stud it out with 2x4s and then drywall (drywall the ceiling too). The outlets you see...I just put in to run some things until I get the basement done. What's wrong with open romex? thanks!

Quote:
What is your plan for the rim joist area?
ChrisDIY - The builder put in the batts of insulation. I have some extra XPS left over from the walls, so I was thinking to cut boards the size of that "opening", put the board in there....seal it up with some caulk and then put the batts back in there...no need to get rid of them. Builder left a bunch of "windows" to the outside in this area........so I need to seal that up. thanks!

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Old 01-16-2011, 10:23 AM   #20
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You can try Dricor on the floor. http://www.dricore.com/en/eIndex.aspx
Never used it but it looks like a good product.
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Old 02-02-2011, 01:20 PM   #21
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I ended up with some extra rigid blue board and so I decided to put it to good use. I pulled the batt insulation out from between the joists and glued blue board to the external board and also put blue board down on the siding that was poorly nailed to the bottom of the joists. Then I went in and filled the seams with Great Stuff.

Once it is not tacky, I will put the batt insulation back.









The drafts have stopped (in the sections I have done) and it is starting to get toasty in the basement!
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Old 03-08-2011, 12:27 PM   #22
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move-sorry

Last edited by ojc; 03-08-2011 at 12:40 PM. Reason: posted in wrong spot
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Old 03-08-2011, 12:41 PM   #23
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** I apparently do not know how to properly place a post. sorry **

With the help of a friend, I was able to get started on framing.
So far I have framed about 48 feet of wall. My framing nailer arrives this Thursday. That should help speed things up.







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Last edited by ojc; 03-08-2011 at 12:45 PM.
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Old 03-08-2011, 02:40 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ojc View Post
** I apparently do not know how to properly place a post. sorry **

With the help of a friend, I was able to get started on framing.
So far I have framed about 48 feet of wall. My framing nailer arrives this Thursday. That should help speed things up.

ojc
Curious, do you require treated wood for the bottom plate? We do here, or if untreated spruce pine, we require a wrap of vapor barrier film to prevent water damage... Some builders go as far as a foam gasket and pressure treated wood to even hold back wicking. This is after sump or drainage requirements in our area...

I like the rigid and spray in the overhangs, I did the same idea here in Calgary where I live and noticed a night and day improvement during our -20 to -35C winters, even though it previously was insulated with fiberglass and vapor barrier. I sealed the cracks as you did, installed rock wool insulation and then covered it with R12 polystyrene and sealed the edges, then installed drywall and caulked the edges for fire rating, as my ceiling is suspended and the mechanical room is unfinished. I'd rather go overboard then ever get called about possible fumes from combustion. :D

I'll watch your thread and hope it all goes well for you!

Good luck!
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Old 04-14-2011, 04:21 PM   #25
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I have begun to change some of the plumbing.





The wife (and I) didn't like the fact that when I am away from home and there is a leak that she could not shut off the water to a part of the house and be able to use the water in a different part of the house. Once this is well labeled....it should be no problem for her to shut things down if need be.

I just think it looks cool.

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Old 04-14-2011, 04:26 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cschwehr View Post
Curious, do you require treated wood for the bottom plate? We do here, or if untreated spruce pine, we require a wrap of vapor barrier film to prevent water damage... Some builders go as far as a foam gasket and pressure treated wood to even hold back wicking. This is after sump or drainage requirements in our area...

I like the rigid and spray in the overhangs, I did the same idea here in Calgary where I live and noticed a night and day improvement during our -20 to -35C winters, even though it previously was insulated with fiberglass and vapor barrier. I sealed the cracks as you did, installed rock wool insulation and then covered it with R12 polystyrene and sealed the edges, then installed drywall and caulked the edges for fire rating, as my ceiling is suspended and the mechanical room is unfinished. I'd rather go overboard then ever get called about possible fumes from combustion. :D

I'll watch your thread and hope it all goes well for you!

Good luck!
cschwehr -

I am using PT wood for the bottom plate. Pretty sure it is required, and I went ahead and put the pink foam under that to provide a capillary break to prevent the water from even hitting the wood. And I have dual sump pumps, one with batt backup to hopefully avoid some issues.

Thanks!

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Old 04-14-2011, 09:12 PM   #27
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Ok, it seems like you have overlooked the most important thing. You should have started referring to the project as "My man cave" immediately to start the process of acclimating her to this eventuality. You'll need to refer to it intensively now, using the phrase at least a dozen times over dinner each night, if you want the desired outcome.
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Old 09-19-2011, 10:15 AM   #28
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Not alot of work was done this summer, but now I am back to it full time (at nights) and hope to have drywall up in the next few weeks. There is a folder of pics above my s



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>>> Folder of More Pics <<<
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Old 09-20-2011, 07:48 AM   #29
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Would you have seen any benefits from taping the seems on the rigid foam?
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Old 09-20-2011, 07:49 AM   #30
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And by chance, is your house a modular home?

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